Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have a C++ program that expects input to cin from the console during run-time, how can I automate this input from a shell script? I also need to store its output in a file but that part is easy. I have researched different ways including echo-ing it to the file descriptor of the pid in /proc, but nothing seems to work.

Here is what I have so far:

#!/bin/sh
g++ -o runme source.cpp
echo <<EOT | ./runme > output
expected program input
more expected program input
even more
EOT

Note that each line of input requires an "enter key-press" to be read by cin in the program, which I am assuming should happen since the program input in the script is separated by new-lines. Here, the program gets executed but the same output is produced in the file regardless of what I put before the EOT so it's not being entered to cin of the program as expected.

share|improve this question

migrated from unix.stackexchange.com Oct 2 '13 at 12:15

This question came from our site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems..

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The form of I/O redirection you want is called a here document and does not involve echo at all:

./runme <<EOF
expected program input
more expected program input
even more
EOF

With output redirection:

./runme <<EOF > output
expected program input
more expected program input
even more
EOF

If you insist on using echo, in principle you could do:

echo -e "expected program input\nmoreexpected program input\neven more\n" | ./runme

where the -e option enables the interpretation of backslash escapes, such as the newlines indicated by \n in the argument of echo.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works flawlessly! –  hesson Oct 2 '13 at 5:20

Just FYI, echo does not read from its standard input (which a here document provides); you would want to use cat instead:

cat <<EOF | ./runme > output
...
...
...
EOF

But this is a useless use of cat, since you can just connect the here document to runme's standard input directly as shown by Thomas Nyman's answer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.