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My goal is to publish in order asynchronous events which arrive in also order and take arbitrary time to be processed. So below is my current implementation using only wait and notify. MyThread processes event, puts results into hashtable by id and notify Scheduler thread if it was blocked before publishing this event in order.

What would be better and more concise approach to implement this functionality using java.util.concurrent package?

import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap;


public class AsyncHandler {
    private final Map<Integer, Object> locks = new ConcurrentHashMap<Integer, Object>();
    private final Map<Integer, Result> results = new ConcurrentHashMap<Integer, Result>();
    private static final Random rand = new Random();

    public AsyncHandler () {
        new Scheduler(this, locks, results).start();
    }

    public void handleEvent(Event event) {
        System.out.println("handleEvent(" + event.id + ")");
        new MyThread(this, event, locks, results).start();
    }

    public Result processEvent (Event event) {
        System.out.println("processEvent(" + event.id + ")");
        locks.put(event.id, new Object());

        try {
            Thread.sleep(rand.nextInt(10000));
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            System.out.println(e);
        }

        return new Result(event.id);
    }

    public void postProcessEvent (Result result) {
        System.out.println(result.id);
    }

    public static void main (String[] args) {
        AsyncHandler async = new AsyncHandler();

        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            async.handleEvent(new Event(i));
        }
    }
}

class Event {
    int id;

    public Event (int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
}

class Result {
    int id;

    public Result (int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
}

class MyThread extends Thread {
    private final Event event;
    private final Map<Integer, Object> locks;
    private final Map<Integer, Result> results;
    private final AsyncHandler async;

    public MyThread (AsyncHandler async, Event event, Map<Integer, Object> locks, Map<Integer, Result> results) {
        this.async = async;
        this.event = event;
        this.locks = locks;
        this.results = results;
    }

    @Override
    public void run () {
        Result res = async.processEvent(event);
        results.put(event.id, res);

        Object lock = locks.get(event.id);

        synchronized (lock) {
            lock.notifyAll();
        }
    }
}

class Scheduler extends Thread {
    private int curId = 0;
    private final AsyncHandler async;
    private final Map<Integer, Object> locks;
    private final Map<Integer, Result> results;

    public Scheduler (AsyncHandler async, Map<Integer, Object> locks, Map<Integer, Result> results) {
        this.async = async;
        this.locks = locks;
        this.results = results;
    }

    @Override
    public void run () {
        while (true) {
            Result res = results.get(curId);
            if (res == null) {
                Object lock = locks.get(curId);

                //TODO: eliminate busy waiting
                if (lock == null) {
                    continue;
                }

                synchronized (lock) {
                    try {
                        lock.wait();
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                        System.out.println(e);
                        System.exit(1);
                    }
                }
                res = results.get(curId);
            }

            async.postProcessEvent(res);
            results.remove(curId);
            locks.remove(curId);
            curId++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
you can use ConcurrentLinkedQueue to handle cuncurency and order of incoming events, start threads that results Future and put them in queue – Eugen Halca Oct 2 '13 at 14:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes the concurrent libraries would be much simpler.

The ExecutorService is designed to wrap a thread pool and a queue to return a Future for each task and provide any thread waiting for the result.

If you want to deal with the results in order, have a thread which deals with the future results in order.

To process asynchronous results in order you can do

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Main main = new Main();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
            final int finalI = i;
            main.submitTask(new Callable<Long>() {
                @Override
                public Long call() throws Exception {
                    long millis = (long) (Math.pow(2000, Math.random()));
                    Thread.sleep(millis);
                    return millis;
                }
            }, new ResultHandler<Long>() {
                @Override
                public void onFuture(Future<Long> future) throws ExecutionException, InterruptedException {
                    System.out.println(new Date() + ": " + finalI + " - Slept for " + future.get() + " millis");
                }
            });
        }
        main.shutdown();
    }


    public interface ResultHandler<T> {
        void onFuture(Future<T> future) throws Exception;
    }

    private final ExecutorService pool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
    private final ExecutorService result = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

    public synchronized <T> void submitTask(Callable<T> callable, final ResultHandler<T> resultHandler) {
        final Future<T> future = pool.submit(callable);
        result.submit(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    resultHandler.onFuture(future);
                } catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        });
    }

    public void shutdown() {
        pool.shutdown();
        result.shutdown();
    }
}

prints

Wed Oct 02 16:32:07 CEST 2013: 0 - Slept for 1 millis
Wed Oct 02 16:32:07 CEST 2013: 1 - Slept for 1899 millis
Wed Oct 02 16:32:09 CEST 2013: 2 - Slept for 32 millis
Wed Oct 02 16:32:09 CEST 2013: 3 - Slept for 32 millis
Wed Oct 02 16:32:09 CEST 2013: 4 - Slept for 214 millis
Wed Oct 02 16:32:09 CEST 2013: 5 - Slept for 366 millis
... many deleted ...
Wed Oct 02 16:32:09 CEST 2013: 82 - Slept for 6 millis
Wed Oct 02 16:32:09 CEST 2013: 83 - Slept for 1636 millis
Wed Oct 02 16:32:10 CEST 2013: 84 - Slept for 44 millis
Wed Oct 02 16:32:10 CEST 2013: 85 - Slept for 1 millis

You can see that although some tasks take much longer than others, the order outputted is the order the tasks were added. You can also see that it is processing many tasks in the same second (concurrently)

share|improve this answer
    
What would be the best data structure implementation to keep results? Should it be some kind of priority queue? Still not sure how to enforce in order publishing? – Nikolay Kuznetsov Oct 2 '13 at 14:19
    
@NikolayKuznetsov see the update I have given with an example. – Peter Lawrey Oct 2 '13 at 14:35
1  
Thanks a lot! So in order publishing is achieved submitting to result pool in order and then calling Future.get which is blocking call, right? – Nikolay Kuznetsov Oct 2 '13 at 15:19
1  
@NikolayKuznetsov yes, processing the order is blocked by any pending result, but the generation of the result can continue in a multi-threaded way and once a result is available, the result processor can catch up quickly. – Peter Lawrey Oct 2 '13 at 15:29

Alternatively you may queue the futures instead of scheduling the post processing to a single thread executor. The logic is very similar; the single thread executor uses a queue internally as well, but the main difference lies in the way the result objects are processed. Using a queue allows a loop for the final processing stage (i.e. like the AWT event processing works). It depends on the application around this part which way fits better.

import java.util.Random;
import java.util.concurrent.*;

public class InOrder
{
  private static final Random rand = new Random();

  final static class Event implements Callable<Result> {
    final int id;

    public Event (int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
    public Result call() throws InterruptedException {
      // arbitrary long computation
      Thread.sleep(rand.nextInt(10000));
      return new Result(id);
    }
  }
  final static class Result {
    int id;

    public Result(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
  }
  static final int STOP_ID = -1;
  private static final ExecutorService POOL = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
  private static final BlockingQueue<Future<Result>> QUEUE = new ArrayBlockingQueue<>(10);

  static void processResults() throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {
    for(;;) {
      Result r=QUEUE.take().get();
      if(r.id==STOP_ID) return;
      System.out.println("received result id="+r.id);
    }
  }
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    POOL.submit(new Callable<Object>() {
      public Object call() throws Exception {
        processResults();
        return null;
      }
    });

    for(int id=0; id<100; id++) try {
      QUEUE.put(POOL.submit(new Event(id)));
    } catch(InterruptedException ex) { break; }

    try { QUEUE.put(new EndMarker()); }
    catch(InterruptedException ex) {}

    POOL.shutdown();
  }
  static final class EndMarker implements Future<Result> {
    public boolean cancel(boolean mayInterruptIfRunning) {
      return false;
    }
    public boolean isCancelled() {
      return false;
    }
    public boolean isDone() {
      return true;
    }
    public Result get() {
      return new Result(STOP_ID);
    }
    public Result get(long timeout, TimeUnit unit) {
      return get();
    }
  }
}
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