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At first glance, I would have expected to be able to cast

ArrayList<Class<? extends Interface1>> 

to

ArrayList<Class<?>>

since the second is clearly a less restrictive version of the first. However, the following code does not compile:

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class TypeInvocationConversionTest
{
  private static ArrayList<Class<? extends Interface1>> classList;

  private static ArrayList<Class<?>> lessRestrictiveClassList;

  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    classList = new ArrayList<Class<? extends Interface1>>();
    lessRestrictiveClassList = (ArrayList<Class<?>>) classList;
  }

  private interface Interface1 {}
}

but produces the error

TypeInvocationConversionTest.java:12: inconvertible types
found   : java.util.ArrayList<java.lang.Class<? extends TypeInvocationConversionTest.Interface1>>
required: java.util.ArrayList<java.lang.Class<?>>
    lessRestrictiveClassList = (ArrayList<Class<?>>) classList;
                                                     ^

I don't think it's unreasonable to want to convert these two types: for motivation, here's a short program that's closer to what I'm actually dealing with (this code does not compile):

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Mammal
{
  public void produceMilk() {}
}

public class Reptile
{
  public void layEggs() {}
}

public interface Species
{
  String getSpeciesName();
}

public class Dog extends Mammal
  implements Species
{
  @Override
  public String getSpeciesName()
  {
    return "Canis lupus familiaris";
  }
}

public class Cat extends Mammal
  implements Species
{
  @Override
  public String getSpeciesName()
  {
    return "Feles catus";
  }
}

public class Boa extends Reptile
  implements Species
{
  @Override
  public String getSpeciesName()
  {
    return "Boa constrictor";
  }
}

public class Panel3 extends Reptile
  implements Species
{
  @Override
  public String getSpeciesName()
  {
    return "Dromiceiomimus brevitertius";
  }
}

public class AnimalFunTime
{
  public static void main(String[] args)
  {
    ArrayList<Class<? extends Mammal>> listOfMammals;
    ArrayList<Class<? extends Reptile>> listOfReptiles;
    ArrayList<ArrayList<Class<?>>> matrixOfAnimals;

    listOfMammals.add(Dog.class);
    listOfMammals.add(Cat.class);

    listOfReptiles.add(Boa.class);
    listOfReptiles.add(Panel3.class);

    ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    // The following two lines cause an error.                                //
    ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    matrixOfAnimals.add( (ArrayList<Class<?>>) listOfMammals);
    matrixOfAnimals.add( (ArrayList<Class<?>>) listOfReptiles);

    // Get milk.
    for (int i = 0 ; i < listOfMammals.size() ; i++) {
      listOfMammals.get(i).produceMilk();
    }

    // Get eggs.
    for (int i = 0 ; i < listOfReptiles.size() ; i++) {
      listOfReptiles.get(i).layEggs();
    }

    // Display all the animals' names.  
    for (int j = 0 ; j < matrixOfAnimals.size() ; j++) {
      ArrayList<Class<?>> currentFamily = matrixOfAnimals.get(j);
      for (int i = 0 ; i < currentFamily.size() ; i++) {
        Class<?> currentAnimal = currentFamily.get(i);
        if (Species.isAssignableFrom(currentAnimal) {
          System.out.println(currentAnimal.getSpeciesName());
        }
        else
        {
          throw new SpeciesNotImplementedException("Please tell us the animal's name!");
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

As the comment says, this code doesn't compile because I am unable to make a list that contains both ArrayList<Class<? extends Mammal>> and ArrayList<Class<? extends reptile>> objects. If I could cast those both to ArrayList<Class<?>>s, then that would be fine. Is there a way to do the cast so this sort of thing works?

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make it generic –  Maciej Cygan Oct 2 '13 at 14:13
    
It all looks pretty generic already! What should I be making generic? –  Donkey_2009 Oct 2 '13 at 14:13
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One of the reasons this doesn't (and shouldn't) work is that lessRestrictiveClassList would reference the same list object as classList. So, if you add an object of type Class<?> (where ? does not extend Interface1) to that list, suddenly the contract of classList is broken:

ArrayList<Class<? extends Interface1>> classList = new ArrayList<>();

// assume this is allowed:
ArrayList<Class<?>> lessRestrictiveClassList = (ArrayList<Class<?>>) classList;

// now add an element to the less restrictive list
lessRestrictiveClassList.add(String.class);

// and obtain it from the original list
// this code will crash, because String does not implement Interface1
Class<? extends Interface1> cls = classList.get(0);

The last line will get you in big problems, because it can lead to unexpected failure of code.

Instead of referencing the array list twice, you should make a copy to the less restrictive list:

ArrayList<Class<? extends Interface1>> classList = new ArrayList<>();
ArrayList<Class<?>> lessRestrictiveClassList = new ArrayList<>();

lessRestrictiveClassList.addAll(classList);
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Forget the generics and cast to raw type ArrayList.

ArrayList<ArrayList> matrixOfAnimals = new ArrayList<>();
matrixOfAnimals.add(listOfMammals);
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since the second is clearly a less restrictive version of the first.

It is not. List<A> is not a subtype of List<B> even if A is a subtype of B. Heuster demonstrated why it's unsafe.

If you don't need to add elements using the second list reference, you should use ArrayList<? extends Class<?>> instead. You can convert ArrayList<Class<? extends Interface1>> to that.

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You can do the cast you want by doing two cast in a row:

lessRestrictiveClassList = (ArrayList<Class<?>>) (ArrayList<?>) classList;

This compiles.

share|improve this answer
    
'You can [do something to] the first, while you can't [do that] to the second.' If that doesn't mean that the first is less restrictive than the second, I don't know what does! However, I see your point: putting two non-primitive objects equal to each other means that they are now the same object, so they have to be exactly as restrictive as each other. –  Donkey_2009 Oct 2 '13 at 15:03
    
@Donkey_2009 your first sentence is wright. That part of my answer was plain wrong and I removed it. –  Etienne Miret Oct 3 '13 at 6:54
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