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I use MonkSVG lib. Here is an example of code:

link

Here is a part of code:

OpenVG_SVGHandler::OpenVG_SVGHandler()
    :   ISVGHandler()
    ,   _mode( kGroupParseMode )
    ,   _current_group( &_root_group ) 
    ,   _blackBackFill( 0 )
    ,   _batch( 0 )
    ,   _use_opacity( 1 )
    ,   _has_transparent_colors( false )

As I understand the first one - ISVGHandler() - means the calling of the parent constructor without params.

So:

  • what do the other params mean?

  • _current_group( &_root_group ) means I need to pass an additional parameter to it, isn't it?

  • For example, is there any difference between _batch(0) and batch = 0;?

  • has an order any influence?

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marked as duplicate by M M., us2012, juanchopanza, Bathsheba, Rob Kennedy Oct 2 '13 at 15:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This should be treated in any introductory C++ book or tutorial –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 2 '13 at 14:59
    
Do a search for "initializer list". –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 2 '13 at 15:01
1  
    
Initialization lists are a Good Thing. This coding style, however, is an abomination. –  John Dibling Oct 2 '13 at 15:12
    
Coding style looks okay to me. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 2 '13 at 15:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
OpenVG_SVGHandler::OpenVG_SVGHandler()
    :   ISVGHandler()
{
    _mod = kGroupParseMode;
    _current_group = &_root_group;
    _blackBackFill = 0;
    _batch = 0;
    _use_opacity = 1;
    _has_transparent_colors = false;
}

=> shortcut =>

OpenVG_SVGHandler::OpenVG_SVGHandler()
    :   ISVGHandler()
    ,   _mode( kGroupParseMode )
    ,   _current_group( &_root_group ) 
    ,   _blackBackFill( 0 )
    ,   _batch( 0 )
    ,   _use_opacity( 1 )
    ,   _has_transparent_colors( false )
{
}

order has some influance

Class::Class()
    :  b(a),    // b == 10, 0, or random value ?? Compiller usually raises warrning
       a(10)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
Members will be initialized in the order in which they appear in the class body. The order in which they appear in the initialization list is irrelevant to the compiler, though good practice dictates that the order should be the same as that of the class body. In your example, if a appears before b in the definition of Class, the initialization will work correctly, and b will be correctly initialized with a. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 2 '13 at 15:11
    
-1: An initialization list is not a shortcut for assignments within the constructor body. The implication is that they are the same thing -- but they aren't. –  John Dibling Oct 2 '13 at 15:13
    
This answer is incomplete but no one can post new answers so I accept it. –  user2083364 Oct 3 '13 at 6:37

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