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I have a page with multiple forms and I only want to show one at a time. For this I separated each form into a section and using Bootstrap's accordion plugin I only allow one open section at a time.

My markup looks something like this:

<a ng-click="open_section('section1')">Section 1</a>

<div collapse="section1">
  <form name="section1Form">
  </form>
</div>

<a ng-click="open_section('section2')">Section 2</a>

<div collapse="section2">
  <form name="section2Form">
  </form>
</div>

Everything work just fine, I can navigate between the forms etc.

Because I don't want the user opening a section if the one they are currently editing contains validation errors, I tried checking in the open_section function if the form associated with it is valid or not.

I tried, but I could not. I could not access the FormController associated with the forms in the controller that is responsible for the page. For some reason, they are not getting published on the scope.

This is what I tried:

  • $scope.section1Form is undefined

  • tried with $scope.$watch('section1Form, function(){}), still undefined

  • tried adding the name of the form as a second parameter to open_section like so: open_section('section1', section1Form) but in the function the second argument is undefined.

Between the <form></form> tags, I have access to the FormController, but outside them I don't. Since the event is coming from outside the <form> (the closing, opening of the sections) I can't pass the FormController to my controller to check the validity of my forms.

Is there a way to get around this, or should I refactor my page?

I am using Angular 1.1.5 btw.

Also, checking with the AngularJS Batarang Chrome plugin, I can see that the forms get published as child scopes to the current scope.

EDIT: this is how the scope hierarchy looks for this app

 - root
 |
 ---current controller\'s scope
 |
 ----scope that contains the forms

Is this because I'm using ng-include? Is there no way to access those forms in a controller then?

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When do you try to check $scope.section1Form. It is not immediately available. Can you try to check it on some event of form, lets say by adding ng-click to some element. –  Chandermani Oct 2 '13 at 15:37
    
If I try to send it out from the form for instance from a submit event with ng-click="something(nameOfForm)" I can use it. But if the event is not happening inside the form, then I cannot. –  adamors Oct 2 '13 at 15:43
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7 Answers 7

To deal with dynamic forms, and thus the dynamic location of the associated FormController, I used a simple directive to help locate the scope that contains the form.

In my case the form was deeply nested in a hierarchy like this: $scope.$$childHead.$$nextSibling.$$nextSibling.$$childHead.myForm

And after navigating through the app, we found the FormController had moved to somewhere else in the scope hierarchy :(

Solution:

Create a directive that $emit's the scope associated w/the form:

  module.directive('formLocator', function() {
    return {
      link: function(scope) {
        scope.$emit('formLocator', scope);
      }
    }

Use the directive in the markup:

<form name="myForm" novalidate="" form-locator>

Listen for the event broadcast by the directive in your controller:

$scope.$on('formLocator', function(event, scope) {
  $scope.myDeeplyNestedForm = scope.myForm;
});
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We can achieve this type of event emit functionality by using angulars natural scope traversal in looking for objects as i've outlined in the answer below stackoverflow.com/a/24495707/154353 –  Abhinav Gujjar Jun 30 at 17:34
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because I was using partial views with ng-view the forms were registered on a child scope of my controller. It seems that I cannot access the child scopes from a parent one, due to prototypical inheritance.

That said, I did manage to get the form controller instances into my controller by passing them through the function that was responsible for opening/closing the accordion.

The solution is something like this:

<a ng-click="open_section('section1', section1Form)">Section 1</a>

<div collapse="section1">
  <form name="section1Form">
  </form>
</div>

<a ng-click="open_section('section2', section2Form)">Section 2</a>

<div collapse="section2">
  <form name="section2Form">
  </form>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
I saw the same thing. but it still leaves open the question of how to get the formController into the scope automatically (as advertised). –  cc young Nov 11 '13 at 12:54
    
It cannot be done because if you're using ng-view, you're basically in a child scope, not in the same one the controller is using. Pretty confusing, especially since it's not documented thoroughly. –  adamors Nov 12 '13 at 23:39
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In the angular documentation one can read:

<form
       [name="{string}"]>
</form>

Name of the form. If specified, the form controller will be published into related scope, under this name.

However, there are certain directives, like ngIf, that create a new scope:

Note that when an element is removed using ngIf its scope is destroyed and a new scope is created when the element is restored.

Can that be your case? If so, you can try setting the form name to something like "forms.section1Form" and then access it accordingly in the scope.

share|improve this answer
    
The form is named in every case, as I said in the sample markup. Is it possible that the accordion is creating and destroying scopes? –  adamors Oct 2 '13 at 15:34
    
Tried it with forms.section1Form. Still getting undefined. –  adamors Oct 2 '13 at 15:53
    
I have updated my question. –  adamors Oct 2 '13 at 18:38
    
My use case may be different, but adding a name to the form made the FormController instance available in my controller's $scope –  findzen Jan 16 at 18:49
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Your controller may be outside your form OR your are trying to get your form before the form is being populated in scope.

I created a PlunkR and it working well.

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Thanks but that was just a typo while creating this question. Sorry about that. My actual code doesn't have these typos. –  adamors Oct 2 '13 at 16:05
    
Added a Plunkr and it's working. –  L105 Oct 2 '13 at 16:24
    
Does it matter if I only set up the controller that the page uses inside the $routeProvider and not in the actual template? –  adamors Oct 2 '13 at 16:56
    
No it should work with $routeProvider. Are you using ng-view to render your routes? –  L105 Oct 2 '13 at 17:19
    
I have updated my question. –  adamors Oct 2 '13 at 18:38
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To access the form from a directive, controller, etc... you can utilize ng-init:

For example:

  <form name="myForm">
     <div ng-init="myLocalScopeVar=form"></div

    <input name="myField" ....>
  </form>

You know can access the form data, or pass back with a bound variable if this is a directive. Example in the controller for the above template:

     if ($scope.myLocalScopeVar.myField.$valid ) ...
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Regarding Sunil D.'s novel solution to providing the form's scope to parent scopes (see http://stackoverflow.com/a/22487840/1518575), you can actually get the form's scope from the event object that is sent in an $emit call.

Since at least Angular 1.0.3, the event object has a targetScope property, which references the scope on which the event was $emit-ed. (See http://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/type/$rootScope.Scope#$on for more information about the properties of the event object.)

With this in mind, you can simplify Sunil D.'s directive code to be:

module.directive('formLocator', function() {
  return {
    link: function(scope) {
      scope.$emit('formLocator');
    }
  }
}

The template doesn't change at all:

<form name="myForm" novalidate="" form-locator>

And subsequently you would change the event handling code to be:

$scope.$on('formLocator', function(event) {
  $scope.myDeeplyNestedForm = event.targetScope.myForm;
});

This directive would be relevant in any scenario where you would want to provide a scope to one of its ancestors, not just in the case of ngForm. In my codebase, I've renamed this directive to the more generic 'present', since one way to think of the directive's purpose is that it announces the presence of a scope.

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There a much simpler way to communicate back up in the scope hierarchy by using angular process of looking for objects up in its scope hierarchy.

This allows us to attach the object from a lower scope into a higher scope by using the dot notation.

In this case you need to create a "catcher" empty object on the top level controller. This catcher object can then be assigned the form objects from the lower scopes. Here is a plunk for demo.

http://plnkr.co/edit/xwsu48bjM3LofAoaRDsN?p=preview

It isn't perfectly elegant but if you think of this "catcher" object as an event listener, we're still following a standard pattern.

create an empty catcher object in the controller where you'd like a reference to the nested form

function mainController($scope){
  $scope.catcher = {

  };
 }

Then in the markup itself whenever the ng-form directive is declared, set catcher.formName = formName like so

<ng-form name="alpha">
          <span ng-init="catcher.alpha = alpha"></span>
          <input type="text" required="" ng-model="alphaValue" />
        </ng-form>

Because we're assigned to "catcher.", angular will traverse up the scope hierarchy and find thd it in the mainController regardless of any number of controllers in between (assuming they also don't have a catcher object, of course)

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