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I have to wrap some native classes in CLI.
But I have doubts on how to override virtual methods of them in their wrapper. So, suppose to have a native class with a virtual method:

class NativeClass {

  virtual void VMethod(std:string text) {
    ...
  }
};

And you want to wrap it with a managed class...I thought to do something like this:

#pragma unmanaged

class NativeWrapper : public NativeClass {
public:
  typedef void (*VMethodFunc)(std::string);

  NativeWrapper(VMethodFunc VMethodFuncPtr) 
    : m_VMethodFuncPtr(VMethodFuncPtr) {}

  void VMethod(std::string text) {
    m_VMethodFuncPtr(text);
  };

private:
  VMethodFunc m_VMethodFuncPtr;
};

#pragma managed

ref class ManagedWrapper {    
public:
  // To Override
  virtual void VMethod(String^ text) {
    Console.WriteLine(text);
  };

private:
  void VMethod(std::string text) {
    String^ sErr = gcnew String(text.c_str());
    VMethod(sErr);
  };

};

But how can I "bind" the ManagedWrapper::VMethod(std::string) to VMethodFunc function pointer? I have found this article in the MSDN but is not exactly the same thing I suppose.

Regards.

share|improve this question
    
I don't quite understand what you're trying to do here. Do you want ManagedWrapper to provide an virtual VMethod(String^ text) that simply delegates to NativeClass::VMethod? –  Nathan Monteleone Oct 2 '13 at 15:34
    
Use the constructor to create an instance of NativeClass, destroy it again in the destructor and the finalizer. –  Hans Passant Oct 2 '13 at 16:57
    
possible duplicate of C++/CLI Mixed Mode DLL Creation –  Hans Passant Oct 2 '13 at 16:57
    
Hi @NathanMonteleone, yes is exactly what I would to do. –  Barzo Oct 3 '13 at 7:00
    
@HansPassant I don't think this is a duplicate, here I'm not asking how to create a wrapper but how to bind a managed method to a native one. –  Barzo Oct 3 '13 at 7:06

1 Answer 1

Almost exactly right, but you should use gcroot and a delegate type instead of a native function pointer.

It is also possible to use the GetFunctionPointerForDelegate function but that can cause lifetime problems.

Note that if the gcroot points to the main wrapper that will cause your objects to leak. Use a second contained helper object instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @BenVoigt thanks for the reply. You mean to use a delegate type in the native class? Can you provide me a little example (or link)? –  Barzo Oct 3 '13 at 7:03

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