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I have an the following function

void Func<T>(IEnumerable<T> e)
{
   // Need type of T here
   Type t = e.CollectionElementsType() ???
}

Now to make it more complicated, I have the following code

void Func(IEnumerable<object> e)
{
   // Need type of T here
   Type t = e.CollectionElementsType() ???
}

Now say I have the following call to the 2nd implementation

Func(new List<int>().Cast<object>());

I want Func to detect the type int. How can I accomplish this?

share|improve this question
    
Do you want the generic List type or the type of a concrete element in the List? If the last you shouldn't ask for a type but for types. –  Ralf Oct 2 '13 at 16:14
    
Second code snipet does not make sense: T is System.Object: do you really mean "how to determine the type of objects inside a IEnumerable<object>?" then the answer is you have to extract each element in turn and look at it (every element could be a different type). –  Richard Oct 2 '13 at 16:15
    
@Richard Due to covariance e could actually be an IEnumerable<string>, or any other type of sequence. –  Servy Oct 2 '13 at 16:17
    
Your code won't compile. You can't convert List<int> to IEnumerable<object>. Post some meaningful code –  Sriram Sakthivel Oct 2 '13 at 16:18
    
@Servy: True of course... but assuming that will just be an maintenance problem (ie. either take the non-generic IEnumerable or make Func generic). –  Richard Oct 2 '13 at 16:20

5 Answers 5

In the case in the question: typeof(T) will work.

More generally reflection can be used on e to extract the type parameter—T—of IEnumerable<T> via Type.GetGenericArguments.

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Would the second method work even when there is no element inside e ? –  fahadash Oct 2 '13 at 16:11
    
@fahadash Yes (both methods do) because they don't depend on the elements, but the type of e itself. –  Richard Oct 2 '13 at 16:12
    
Edited the question. Would the second method work in case of the IEnumerable<object> ? –  fahadash Oct 2 '13 at 16:13
    
@fahadash See my comment on the Q. (Also: better on Stack Overflow to state the whole question up front, the Q&A format doesn't work if you only reveal the real question incrementally). –  Richard Oct 2 '13 at 16:16
// returns an enumeration of T where o : IEnumerable<T>
public IEnumerable<Type> GetGenericIEnumerables(object o) {
    return o.GetType()
            .GetInterfaces()
            .Where(t => t.IsGenericType == true
                && t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IEnumerable<>))
            .Select(t => t.GetGenericArguments()[0]);
}
share|improve this answer

Why not doing this? :

Type t = typeof(T);

read more about typeof

EDIT:

for more complicated case you can have more than one type, so you can do this:

IEnumerable<Type> GetTypes (IEnumerable<object> list)
{
    foreach (object a in list)
    {
       yield return a.GetType();
    }
}

if it's really only one type, you can write Type t = GetTypes(yourEnumerable).FirstOrDefault(). GetType() will get the real type of object.

read about GetType

share|improve this answer
    
Edited the question. –  fahadash Oct 2 '13 at 16:12
    
@fahadash check edited answer –  wudzik Oct 2 '13 at 16:17
    
I am only passing one homogeneous types. All I need to get is one single type. Which is sure going to be type of all objects –  fahadash Oct 2 '13 at 16:41

For your first case

Type t = typeof(T);

For your second case when you use covariance

Type t = e.GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0];

When you really pass different types you'll have to loop through elements and check element.GetType()

share|improve this answer
    
Thankyou. Looks like there is no possible way of getting the type when Enumerable has no element. –  fahadash Oct 2 '13 at 16:51
    
Not at all possible since you can add anything into it. but if you use IEnumerable<object> and you want to find System.Object that is possible even with empty list also –  Sriram Sakthivel Oct 2 '13 at 16:54

To get the Type of T use this:

void Func(IEnumerable<T> e)
{
    Type t = typeof(T);
}

To get the Type of the elements, an alternative is to get the type of the first item (Assuming that all items on list are of the same type):

void Func(IEnumerable<T> e)
{
    Type t;
    if(e.Count() > 0){
        t = e.ElementAt(0).GetType();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That assumes that there are items; there may not be any. –  Servy Oct 2 '13 at 16:16
    
IEnumerable<T> does not have a Count property. The underlying concrete type might have but you'll need some form of cast to use it. However not all IEnumerable<T> implementations will have such a member. –  Richard Oct 2 '13 at 16:18
    
And if you iterate the sequence multiple times it may not have the same items, or even the same number of items. This also break on an infinite sequence, and is ungodly inefficient on really long sequences. –  Servy Oct 2 '13 at 16:19

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