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i have two lists:

a=[[10, 0], [12,1], [13, 8], [2, -3]]
b=[1, 2, -30, 404]

i'd like to replace the a[*][1] values with the ones from b, so that my result looks like:

[[10, 1], [12, 2], [13, -30], [2, 404]]

an obvious way (for me, being really a C-programmer) would be something like:

for i in range(len(a)):
   a[i][1]=b[i]

but somehow this feels not very pythonic.

what how would i do that in a pythonic way?

additionally, the b-list could have more or less elements than a. if there are less, the remaining elements in a should stay unchanged.

a=[[10, 0], [12,1], [13, 8], [2, -3]]
b=[10, 20]

result=[[10, 10], [12,20], [13, 8], [2, -3]]

if they are more, i'd like to add new entries with a default first element (e.g. None)

a=[[10, 0], [12,1]]
b=[100, 200, -30, 404]

result=[[10, 100], [12,200], [None, -30], [None, 404]]

can this be acchieved with list-comprehensions?

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It would help me to understand why you think your solution is unpythonic. Because as I said in my answer, I don't think it is – a simple list comprehension is a beautiful thing, but Sparse is better than dense is more pythonic. –  kojiro Oct 2 '13 at 16:43
    
@kojiro for(i=0; i<len(); i++) always gives me the impression i'm thinking too much in C –  umläute Oct 2 '13 at 16:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

enumerate is generally accepted as a pythonic alternative to looping over the range of list indices. Other than that, there's really nothing unpythonic about your solution.

for i, v in enumerate(b):
  try:
    a[i][1] = v
  except IndexError:
    a.append([None, v])

or, using iterators to avoid multiple try/catch triggers:

bnumer = enumerate(b)
for i, v in bnumer:
  try:
    a[i][1] = v
  except IndexError:
    break

# extend the list with the remaining default values from b
a.extend([None,v] for v in bnumer)
share|improve this answer
    
i like that (esp. the non-optimized first solution); but a[i]=[None, v] will bail out with an IndexError; a[i]+=[[None, v]] –  umläute Oct 2 '13 at 16:57
    
while i like @hcwhsa's answer most for the simple case (with both lists of equal length), this solution seems to be the most readable for both cases. –  umläute Oct 2 '13 at 17:05
    
@umläute thanks, fixed the extra IndexError –  kojiro Oct 2 '13 at 18:45

Use zip and list comprehension:

>>> a[:] = [[x, z] for (x, y), z   in zip(a, b)]
>>> a
[[10, 1], [12, 2], [13, -30], [2, 404]]

For the cases with unequal length lists you can use iterools.izip_longest:

>>> from itertools import izip_longest
>>> a = [[10, 0], [12,1], [13, 8], [2, -3]]
>>> b = [10, 20]
>>> sen = object()
#len(a) > len(b)
>>> a[:] = [[x, y if z is sen else z]
                          for (x, y), z in izip_longest(a, b, fillvalue=sen)]
>>> a
[[10, 10], [12, 20], [13, 8], [2, -3]]

>>> a = [[10, 0], [12,1]]
>>> b = [100, 200, -30, 404]
#len(b) > len(a)
>>> a[:] = [[None if x is sen else x , z] 
                          for (x, y), z in izip_longest(a, b, fillvalue=[sen]*2)]
>>> a
[[10, 100], [12, 200], [None, -30], [None, 404]]

Use a generator function, if you think that the list comprehensions are too unreadable:

def solve(a, b):
    sen = object()
    if len(a) == len(b):
        for (x, y), z in zip(a, b):
            yield [x, z]
    elif len(a) > len(b):
        for (x, y), z in izip_longest(a, b, fillvalue=sen):
            yield [x, y if z is sen else z]
    else:
        for (x, y), z in izip_longest(a, b, fillvalue=[sen]*2):
            yield [None if x is sen else x , z]

Demo:

>>> list(solve([[10, 0], [12,1], [13, 8], [2, -3]], [1, 2, -30, 404]))
[[10, 1], [12, 2], [13, -30], [2, 404]]

>>> list(solve([[10, 0], [12,1], [13, 8], [2, -3]], [10, 20]))
[[10, 10], [12, 20], [13, 8], [2, -3]]

>>> list(solve([[10, 0], [12,1]], [100, 200, -30, 404]))
[[10, 100], [12, 200], [None, -30], [None, 404]]
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1  
Cute, but how is it actually better than a simple loop? –  kojiro Oct 2 '13 at 16:29
    
@kojiro List comprehension and no indexes. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 2 '13 at 16:30
    
We can get into an argument about what pythonic means, but I think this violates lines 5, 9, 15 and possibly 19 of python -m this | cat -n –  kojiro Oct 2 '13 at 16:32

Try this, using list comprehensions:

if len(a) > len(b):
    result = [[e[0], b[i]] if i < len(b) else e for i, e in enumerate(a)]
else:
    result = [[a[i][0], e] if i < len(a) else [None, e] for i, e in enumerate(b)]

The above takes into consideration the three cases described in the question, whether it's more pythonic or not it's up to you to judge - but it produces correct results, and that's what matters most.

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