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For example, I have array

Array
(
    [0] => folder1/file1.txt
    [1] => folder1/file2.txt
    [2] => file2.txt
    [3] => folder2/file1.txt
    [4] => folder1/subfolder1/file1.txt
    [5] => folder1/subfolder2/file2.txt
    [6] => file1.txt
    [7] => file3.txt
    [8] => folder1/subfolder2/file1.txt
)

I need a clue to figure how to create 'directory tree' array, based on the given values, that it could look like this:

Array
(
    [folder1] => Array
        (
            [0] => file1.txt
            [1] => file2.txt
            [subfolder1] => Array
                (
                    [0] => file1.txt
                )

            [subfolder2] => Array
                (
                    [0] => file1.txt
                    [1] => file2.txt
                )

        )

    [0] => file1.txt
    [1] => file2.txt
    [2] => file3.txt
)

Now second array is a tree of the first array (made manually). =)

And I can't figure how to achieve this automatically.

share|improve this question
    
    
@Kristen Jukowski that topic involves real files and dirs, and I don't have ones – el Dude Oct 2 '13 at 16:41
1  
@KristenJukowski That question starts with a recursive directory iterator, this question starts with a flat array. I'm pretty sure I answered a similar question a while back, I'm trying to find it. – Barmar Oct 2 '13 at 16:41
    
@Barmar I've searched for it too. unsuccessfully – el Dude Oct 2 '13 at 16:42
    
Something like this? But that kind of structure calls for trouble: what if you have folder named 0 ? – Glavić Oct 2 '13 at 16:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Simples example (demo), that will generate output like you wish, but you will get conflict if you will have same folder and file name in the same directory level (demo).

$files = [
    'folder1/file1.txt',
    'folder1/file2.txt',
    'file2.txt',
    'folder2/file1.txt',
    'folder1/subfolder1/file1.txt',
    'folder1/subfolder2/file2.txt',
    'file1.txt',
    'file3.txt',
    'folder1/subfolder2/file1.txt',
];

$tree = [];
foreach ($files as $file) {
    $a = explode('/', $file);
    $array = &$tree;
    foreach (array_slice($a, 0, -1) as $folder) {
        if (!isset($array[$folder])) $array[$folder] = [];
        $array = &$array[$folder];
    }
    $array[] = end($a);
}
print_r($tree);

To overcome problem with same folder and file named on the same level you can create folder indexes with slash at the end, like folder/, so there cannot be any conflict (demo).

share|improve this answer
    
thanx a lot, man – el Dude Oct 2 '13 at 17:14
    
you can create folder indexes do you mean empty folders? – el Dude Oct 2 '13 at 17:49
    
No, I meant that if you have a folder, array index will be with slash as folder/. And empty folders are also supported. Example. – Glavić Oct 2 '13 at 18:30

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