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I have 3 csvs, two contains lists of "classes" and the other contains my main dataset, what I need my code to do is perform one calulation if the data in column 2 appears in list csv 1, but do a different calculation if the data in column 2 appears in list csv 2 and overwrite a value in the main csv column 12:

Lets assume list csv 1 contains the following:

classA

and list csv 2

classB
classC

and my main data list contains the following:

X,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,21.8,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x

What I want to do is the following: If column 2 of main dataset is in csv list 1 then multiply column 6 by column 11 and replace the value in column 12. However if the text in column 2 of main of main dataset is in csv list 2 then divide column 6 by column 11 and replace the value in column 12. I have to perform this manipulation on about 700k rows of data (so efficiency is of high importance), and obviously the list 1 & 2 are much larger than just 1/2 pieces of data. If I can get a piece code that can perform this function then I will be using the method rather alot.

So what i need said code to return is the following:

x,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,375,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,375,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,375,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
x,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x

Many thanks in advance SMNALLY

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted
+50

Try this, it should help you get it working :)

Example code

# import library
import csv

# a list of items for later checking
alist = ["item", "item"]

# open the document in question
with open('main.csv', 'rb') as old_csv:
    # open the main csv in csv.reader
    csv_reader = csv.reader(old_csv)
    # now open the file we are going to write data to
    with open('main_mod.csv', 'wb') as new_csv:
        # open the new csv in csv.writer
        csv_writer = csv.writer(new_csv)
        # for each row, enumerate through contents of csv reader
        for i, row in enumerate(csv_reader):
            # if "line" != 0 then 
            if i != 0:
                # if row[1] (column 2) is in "alist" which is defined at the top then...
                if row[1] in alist:
                    print "in a list"
                    row.append(float(row[10]) / float(row[47])) # your calculation here
                # if row[1] not in "alist" then...
                else:
                    print "not in a list"
                    row.append(float(row[10]) / float(row[47])) ## your calculation here
                #obviously you can use multiple lists and use elif row[1] in alist2:
                #write row to csv_writer
                csv_writer.writerow(row)

If you need any help just reply back and I'll try and help :)

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Simple yet effective. Will upvote all the others and accept this one. –  SMNALLY Oct 8 '13 at 2:36

Here's a short script that will iterate through your main file one line at a time, perform the operations you are looking for, and will then output the line to a new file called 'updated-main.csv':

#!/usr/bin/python

# Load the first two CSV class files (assuming only one column)
L1 = set([l.rstrip() for l in open('1.csv') ])
L2 = set([l.rstrip() for l in open('2.csv') ])

with open("main.csv") as IN, open("updated-main.csv", "w") as OUT:
    for l in IN:
        arr = l.rstrip().split(",")
        # "If column 2 of main dataset is in csv list 1"
        if arr[1] in L1:
            # multiply column 6 by column 11 and replace the value in column 12
            arr[11] = str( float(arr[5]) * float(arr[10]) )
        # "If column 2 of main dataset is in csv list 2"
        elif arr[1] in L2:
            # divide column 6 by column 11 and replace the value in column 12
            arr[11] = str( float(arr[5]) / float(arr[10]) )

        OUT.write( ",".join(arr) + "\n" )

Because it goes through the lines in the (presumably large) 'main.csv' file, it will be memory efficient. Using this script and the example input you've given, I get your desired output:

X,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,375.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,375.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,375.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classC,uniqueclassindicator4,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,0.048,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator5,x,x,6,x,x,x,x,125,750.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for including comments, they always prove as valuable as the code its self! Many thanks –  SMNALLY Oct 5 '13 at 14:42
    
I think I will be awarding the bounty to this answer, however I was wondering if I could ask for some changes (hopefully small). Although I am not sure. I will include proposed changes in the question. –  SMNALLY Oct 7 '13 at 10:39
    
Could you update your desired output with the new header you're looking for? I don't think I understand the example you wrote out... –  mdml Oct 7 '13 at 15:09
    
I am not suprised you are confused. I edited the wrong question. I hope you didnt spend too long trying to work that one out! –  SMNALLY Oct 7 '13 at 16:37
    
This is not a bad answer. It's very clear and easy to understand. I can't tell if you avoided the csv module in an attempt to make the code simpler or to make the program run faster. If the data contains literal commas (not meant to be delimiters) then it will be much, much simpler to use the csv module. If you were just going for speed, then one very obvious improvement is to use sets instead of lists to store the classes from the first two CSV files. –  John Y Oct 8 '13 at 0:43

Here's a solution that uses a dictionary for the class lookups instead of lists. Of course it's always a good idea to test it to be sure, but my guess is that this whole operation will likely be largely I/O bound, so the actual implementation may not be of great importance.

import csv 
from operator import mul, div 

# [1.]  This function reads each ancillary csv file, and adds the passed in operator
#       to the converter_dictionary 
def converter_dict_mutator(converter_dict, csv_file, operator):
    with open(csv_file, 'rb') as csv:
        for line in csv:
            converter_dict[line.strip()] = operator 

def write_new_rows(main_csv, csv_writer, converter_dict):
    # [3.]  Open up the main csv file with a csv reader
    with open(main_csv, 'rb') as main_csv_fp:
        main_reader = csv.reader(main_csv_fp)

    # [3.]  Loop through each line in the main csv file.  Each row
    #       in the main csv file has been converted to a python list by 
    #       the csv reader
        for row in main_reader:
            # [4.]  Convert the data in the main csv file to the new format
            row[11] = converter_dict[row[1]](float(row[5]), float(row[10]))
            # [5.]  Use the csv writer to write the modified row to the new
            #       csv file
            csv_writer.writerow(row)

def create_new_main_csv(main_csv, new_main_csv, converter_dict):
    # [2.]  Create a csv writer object that will be used to write the new csv file 
    with open(new_main_csv, 'wb') as new_main_csv_fp:
        csv_writer = csv.writer(new_main_csv_fp)

        write_new_rows(main_csv, csv_writer, converter_dict)

def main():
    # [1.]  Create a dictionary of conversion operations by reading 
    #       the two ancillary csv files
    converter_dictionary = {}
    converter_dict_mutator(converter_dictionary, 'csv1.csv', mul)
    converter_dict_mutator(converter_dictionary, 'csv2.csv', div)

    create_new_main_csv('main_dataset.csv', 
                        'new_main_dataset.csv', 
                         converter_dictionary)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Program Breakdown:
1. The first part of the program consists of building a "converter_dictionary". The keys to this dictionary are the "classes" in the ancillary csv files, and the values are functions, or operations, that are going to be applied to the main dataset. In this case, csv1 corresponds to a multiplication operation, and csv2 corresponds to a division operation. Applied to the example files given above, you end up with a dictionary equivalent to this one:

converter_dictionary = {'classA': mul,
                        'classB': div,
                        'classC': div}

The division/multiplication operations were imported from the operator module, but the program is extensible in that there's nothing stopping you from using other operations from different modules, or even writing your own functions to be applied to the main dataset! You could, for example, define your own multiplication function like this, and replace all the references to the 'mul' function, with no ill effects in the program:

def my_multiply(x, y):
    return x * y


2. The second step is to create a new csv writer object. The writer object can take a python list, convert that list into csv format, and write the output to a file. There is a nice description in the documentation here.

3. After the writer object is created, the main csv is opened with a csv reader. The reader is sort of like the inverse of a csv writer object. Given a csv file, the reader will automatically split the csv file's lines into python lists (documentation here).

4. Next, the data from the main csv is converted into the new format. In my opinion, this is the most confusing part of the program. The heavy lifting is done in this line:

row[11] = converter_dict[row[1]](float(row[5]), float(row[10]))

row[11] refers, of course, to column 12 in the main csv file, meaning that column 12 is going to be changed to some new value. In this process, the first step is to use the converter_dict to see what operation should be used. The operation is determined by doing a lookup in the converter_dict with the value that is found in column 2 (row[1]) of the main csv file.

So for example, if column 2 of the main csv file was 'classA', the converter_dict would return the function 'mul' as shown in the converter_dictionary in step #1. Stepwise, the process would look kind of like this:

row[11] = converter_dict["classA"](float(row[5]), float(row[10]))
===============================>
row[11] = mul(float(row[5]), float(row[10]))
=== which is equivalent to ====>
row[11] = float(row[5]) * float(row[10])

This process assumes that every class in the main csv file will also be found in one of the ancillary csv files. If the class is not found in one of the ancillary csv files, python will throw a KeyError. If you expect that your main csv file will have classes that are not found in the ancillary csv files, you can wrap this line in a try/catch block.


5. Finally, the csv writer is used to write the modified row to the output file.

Output
The output is shown below. The rows that had a multiplication conversion have trailing zeros, which is different than what you have above. You could modify the script a bit to correct for this if it bothers you.

X,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,375.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,375.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator1,x,x,3,x,x,x,x,125,375.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classB,uniqueclassindicator2,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,0.032,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
X,classA,uniqueclassindicator3,x,x,4,x,x,x,x,125,500.0,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x,x
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share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot :) Would it be too much to ask you to add comments to the code so I can reverse engineer it and apply it to my real data. Many thanks SMNALLY –  SMNALLY Oct 5 '13 at 14:41
    
@SMNALLY Yes of course! I've added some comments to my post above. Hopefully they will help clarify the program's workflow –  Kurtis Oct 6 '13 at 17:55
    
You guys are the best :) –  SMNALLY Oct 6 '13 at 23:24

Not sure I correctly understand the bounty conditions but here is a (hopefully detailed) explanation of Kurtis's answer. I chose his answer mainly because of the dictionary look-up for the operation to be performed.

The OP wants to perform an operation on three columns (6, 11, 2) of a csv data file.
The operation to be performed depends on whether the contents of column 2 are in list1 (csv1) or list2 (csv2)...

  • row[11] = row[5] * row[10] if row[1] is in list1
  • row[11] = row[5] / row[10] if row[1] is in list2

Choosing the operation to be performed will require a search through list1 and list2 for each line of the data file. This O(n) search is alleviated by an operator lookup table (created once).

converter_dict_mutator() constructs a lookup table which should make the operator selection a constant time operation. The dictionary keys are the items in list1 and list2. The dictionary values are either operator.mul() or operator.div()

converter_dictionary =>
{list1_item : mul, list1_item : mul, ... list2_item : div, list2_item : div}

div and mul take two arguments - the operation to be performed can written as:

  • row[11] = mul(row[5], row[10]) if row[1] is in list1
  • row[11] = div(row[5], row[10]) if row[1] is in list2

The operation to be performed on any given line is retrieved from converter_dictionary with converter_dictionary[row[1]] - so:

  • row[11] = converter_dictionary[row[1]](row[5], row[10])

write_new_row() accomplishes the OP's task by

  • iterating over the data file using a csv_reader
  • performing the operation using the dictionary lookup
  • writing the result to a new file using a csv_writer

create_new_main_csv() just creates a csv_writer then calls write_new_row() with this csv_writer.

function main() creates the lookup dictionary and calls create_new_main_csv()

A few comments and docstrings added to original code.

import csv 
from operator import mul, div 

def converter_dict_mutator(converter_dict, csv_file, operator):
    """Create an operator lookup table.

    Adds items to converter_dictionary - {csv_file item : operator}
    Assumes csv_file has a single column -> one item per row/line

    converter_dictionary -> dict
    csv_file -> str, filepath
    return dict
    """
    with open(csv_file, 'rb') as csv:
        for line in csv:
            converter_dict[line.strip()] = operator
            # if there are more than items per row/line ...
            # converter_dict[line.strip().split(',')] = operator


def write_new_row(main_csv, csv_writer, converter_dict):
    """Modify column 12 based on columns 2, 6, 10 and write a new file.

    Uses an operator lookup table/dictionary to determine the operation performed.

    main_csv -> str, filepath
    csv_writer -> csv.csv_writer for the new, modified file
    converter_dict -> dict, operator lookup table
    return None
    """
    with open(main_csv, 'rb') as main_csv_fp:
        main_reader = csv.reader(main_csv_fp)
        for row in main_reader:
            # column 1 == row[0]
            # column 12 = operator(column 6, column 11)
            row[11] = converter_dict[row[1]](float(row[5]), float(row[10]))
            csv_writer.writerow(row)

def create_new_main_csv(main_csv, new_main_csv, converter_dict):
    """Create a new, modified data file.

    main_csv -> str, filepath
    newmain_csv -> str, filepath
    coverter_dict -> dict, operator lookup table
    return None
    """
    with open(new_main_csv, 'wb') as new_main_csv_fp:
        csv_writer = csv.writer(new_main_csv_fp)
        write_new_row(main_csv, csv_writer, converter_dict)

def main():
    # creator operator lookup table
    converter_dictionary = {}
    converter_dict_mutator(converter_dictionary, 'csv1.csv', mul)
    converter_dict_mutator(converter_dictionary, 'csv2.csv', div)
    # make the new file
    create_new_main_csv('main_dataset.csv', 'new_main_dataset.csv', converter_dictionary)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Seems like write_new_row() and create_new_main_csv() could be combined (not tested):

def create_new_main_csv(main_csv, new_main_csv, converter_dict):
    """Create a new, modified data file.

    Modify column 12 based on columns 2, 6, 10 and write a new file.
    Uses an operator lookup table/dictionary to determine the operation performed.

    main_csv -> str, filepath
    newmain_csv -> str, filepath
    coverter_dict -> dict, operator lookup table
    return None
    """
    with open(main_csv, 'rb') as main, open(new_main_csv, 'wb') as new:
        main_reader = csv.reader(main)
        new_writer = csv.writer(new)
        for row in main_reader:
            # column 1 == row[0]
            # column 12 = operator(column 6, column 11)
            row[11] = converter_dict[row[1]](float(row[5]), float(row[10]))
            new_writer.writerow(row)
share|improve this answer
    
@Kurtis beat me to the punch but it was good practice for me anyway. –  wwii Oct 6 '13 at 19:06
    
Good addition thanks! –  Kurtis Oct 6 '13 at 20:44
    
You guys are the best :) –  SMNALLY Oct 6 '13 at 23:28
    
I have added two edit requests to the question. I know this is cheeky and you of course hace no obligation to make the edit. Kind regards SMNALLY –  SMNALLY Oct 7 '13 at 10:58

I recently discovered the pandas library, which will make this very easy. http://pandas.pydata.org/

Basically, you'll load each of the three datasets using read_csv:

csv1 = pandas.read_csv(...)
csv2 = pandas.read_csv(...)
data = pandas.read_csv(...)

Then, you preform an "outer" merge. This will only reveal columns that are common between the two.

merged_data = pandas.merge(data, csv1, on=[2], how="outer")   # You might have to use left_on and right_on if your column names don't match (or you are using column numbers)
csv1_only = merged_data[pandas.notnull(merged_data[ASDF])]    # ASDF is a column that is only in csv1
# Work with your data like you need
merged_data = pandas.merge(merged_data, csv2, ...)
# edit merged_data as needed

At the end, you should be able to write the first N columns of merged_data to file or stdout or whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi can you use pandas not in this Ipython IDE? –  SMNALLY Oct 2 '13 at 19:39
1  
Not sure what you are asking, but I don't use iPython, just vi and run on the command line. So, I think the answer is yes. It's just a regular python library. I think it does have some special enhancements that might fit nicely into the notebook stuff, but I haven't ever tried that. –  user632657 Oct 2 '13 at 20:27

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