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I don't understand the syntax used in the following lines, except that it follows a basic structure of what seems to be called a ternary operator.

string path = args == null || args.Length == 0 ?
    @"C:\GENERIC\SYSTEM\PATH" :
    args[1];

I'm new to this syntax. Would someone help me translate it into real English (or pseudocode), much in the way an if statement can be turned into "if this then that"?

EDIT: Thank you everyone for your answers, you've all been extremely helpful. Unfortunately I can only vote one of you, but I'll upvote a bunch of you!

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2  
Unrelated, but this code will fail if args is an array/collection of exactly 1 item in length. –  vcsjones Oct 2 '13 at 18:53
9  
Just as a side note, the name of this operator is the conditional operator. It's a ternary operator because it's got three operands, and currently it's the only such operator... but that's all that the term "ternary" means here. –  Jon Skeet Oct 2 '13 at 18:54
2  
@JonSkeet Since it's the only one, it's commonly referred to as the ternary operator, and everyone understands it. This term is more common than conditional operator, despite being less precise. –  Barmar Oct 2 '13 at 18:56
3  
@Barmar: And if a second ternary operator is ever introduced, everyone who refers to it as "the ternary operator" will need to change, despite the operator itself not changing. My main objection is that it's just sloppy to describe something by one characteristic which happens to currently make it unique - rather than using its name which identifies it by its behaviour. –  Jon Skeet Oct 2 '13 at 18:59
1  
That will become the other ternary operator :) –  Barmar Oct 2 '13 at 19:00

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you are seeing is a special conditional operator, the ternary operator. (And here is a nice tutorial)

It is used like so:

condition ? first_expression : second_expression;

Basically if the statement is true, the first expression is executed, if not, the second is. Generally speaking it is a small shortcut for if/else blocks, and should be used for only small statements. Nesting the ternary operator is largely frowned upon.

So if args == null || args.Length == 0 Then path = @"C:\GENERIC\SYSTEM\PATH", if not, it equals args[1]

It is equivalent to your standard if block

string path;
if(args == null || args.Length == 0)
{
   path = @"C:\GENERIC\SYSTEM\PATH";
}
else
{
   path = args[1];
}
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1  
And for the OP, now that you know what it does please resist the urge to use it everywhere. The longer a ternary expression goes, the harder it is to read — and that goes double if you end up nesting them. –  Steve Howard Oct 2 '13 at 19:01
    
@SteveHoward Good to know! And if I do use one, I'll certainly document it for developers down the road! –  jwarner112 Oct 2 '13 at 19:05
    
A good example would be like this Draw(Image, IsActive ? Color.Red : Color.Green); and not a long list of elses like amount = something < .5f ? 1 : something < .2f ? .5f : somethingelse ? 10 : 0; –  Cyral Oct 2 '13 at 19:07
    
@SteveHoward: Actually, I find that when laid out properly they can be really readable when nested. It depends on the situation, but if you're basically going through a lot of possibilities, stopping the first time you meet a criterion, it's a nice way of expressing it compactly... once you've seen the pattern. –  Jon Skeet Oct 2 '13 at 19:13
    
@MySelf Look I even wrote that example wrong :P –  Cyral Oct 2 '13 at 19:17

This is equivalent to

string path;
if(args == null || args.Length == 0)
    path = @"C:\GENERIC\SYSTEM\PATH" ;
else
    path = args[1];

You can break down a ternary operator to this

VariableToStoreResult = BooleanCondition ? ValueIfConditionIsTrue : ValueIfConditionIsFalse
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This answer is fantastic, however I've got to vote in favor of Cyral because I feel his explanation is formatted a little more safely for beginners. Thank you for the help! –  jwarner112 Oct 2 '13 at 19:08
string path = "";

if(args==null || args.Length==0)
{
   path = @"C:\GENERIC\SYSTEM\PATH";
}
else
{
   path = args[1];
}

This is a translation. Ternary operator looks like:

result = (condition)?firstResult:otherResult

your ternary operator means: if args are null or empty -> use default path | else -> use path from args

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it can be rewritten as:

string path;

if(args == null || args.Length == 0)
    path = @"C:\GENERIC\SYSTEM\PATH";
else
    path = args[1];
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Basically

If args is null or length of args is zero
Then
Path = "C:\Generic\System\Path"
Else
Path = args[1]

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Like Jon Skeet has said in the comments, this operator is called the conditional operator. The reason behind is name is that it works very much like an if-statement. It's often called the ternary operator, because it's currently the only operator with three operands.

Now, the explanation:

int myInt = myBool ? valueWhenTrue : valueWhenFalse;

This translates into something like:

int myInt;
if(myBool)
   myInt = valueWhenTrue;
else
   myInt = valueWhenFalse;

Important note: The conditional operator can only be used for expressions (and is evaluated itself as an expression), not statements. This, for example, is invalid code:

myBool ? DoSomething() : DoSomethingElse();
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I wonder if any languages use "operator" syntax for any other ternary operators? I can think of at least two: a non-short-circuit bit-level version of ? : [which would be to ? : what & is to &&, i.e. x |?| y |:| z would be (x & y) | (~x & z)], and an "in range" operator or family of operators to test whether an expression yields a value in a certain range. –  supercat Oct 2 '13 at 19:13
    
@supercat I can't really think of a situation where a non-short-circuiting ?: might be useful. –  lesderid Oct 2 '13 at 19:18

The structure is quite basic

variable = value;

but now the value depends on a condition that renders true or false;

variable = condition ? true : false;

Condition can be anything, even a function that returns this true or false state.

What you see in the example you submitted is a combined condition.

string path = args == null || args.Length == 0 ?
    @"C:\GENERIC\SYSTEM\PATH" :
    args[1];

Here the conditions renders true if one of the statements in the "OR" is true

read

string path = 

(if "args == null" is true)  OR (if "args.Length == 0" is true) then value = @"C:\GENERIC\SYSTEM\PATH" 
 else
(if both false) then  value = args[1]
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From high level to low level, here the operators precedence;

==, ||, ?:, =

So basicly, your code equavalent to;

string path;
if((args == null) || (args.Length == 0))
{
    path = @"C:\GENERIC\SYSTEM\PATH" ;
}
else
{
    path = args[1];
}

Take a look at ?: Operator (C# Reference)

The conditional operator (?:) returns one of two values depending on the value of a Boolean expression. Following is the syntax for the conditional operator.

condition ? first_expression : second_expression;
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1  
While this is true, the question was more about the meaning of the conditional operator than about operator precedence. –  lesderid Oct 2 '13 at 19:08

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