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I want to integrate a piecewise a defined function that is multiplied by the Legendre polynomials. Unfortunately, I can't find how to use the nth Legendre polynomial of x in the documentation. I want to integrate each Legendre polynomial of x when n = 1,..., 50 so I have set n = np.arange(1, 51, 1).

import numpy as np
import pylab
from scipy import integrate

n = np.arange(1, 51, 1)                                                   


def f(x):
    if 0 <= x <= 1:
        return 1
    if -1 <= x <= 0:
        return -1

I suppose I need to define another function let's say u(x).

c = []


def u(x):
    c.append((2. * n + 1) / 2. * integrate.quad(f(x) * insert Legendre polynomials here, -1., 1.)) 
    return sum(c * Legendre poly, for nn in range(1, 51)) 

So I would then return some u(x) with the first 50 terms expanding my piecewise function by Legendre polynomials.

Edit 1:

If this can't be done, I could use Rodrigues's Formula to compute the nth Legendre polynomial. However, I couldn't find anything useful when I was looking for computing nth derivatives in Python.

P_n(x) = \frac{1}{2^n n!}\frac{d^n}{dx^n}(x^2 - 1)^n

So this is an option if someone knows how to implement such a scheme in Python.

Edit 2:

Using Saullo Castro's answer, I have:

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import quad

def f(x, coef):
    global p
    p = np.polynomial.legendre.Legendre(coef=coef)
    if 0 <= x <= 1:
        return 1*p(x)
    if -1 <= x <= 0:
        return -1*p(x)

c = []
for n in range(1, 51):
    c.append((2. * n + 1.) / 2. * quad(f, -1, 1, args=range(1,n+1))[0])

def g(x)
    return sum(c * p(x) for n in range(1, 51))

However, if I print c, the values are wrong. The values should be 1.5, 0, -7/8, 0, ...

Also, when I plot g, I would like to do x = np.linspace(-1, 1, 500000) so the plot is detailed but c is only 50. How can this be achieved?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I understand your question correctly, you want to calculate the integral of f(x) * Ln(x) where f(x) is a piecewise function you're defining with a python function. I'm assuming you're not specifically interested in this particular step function.

You can get the values of the Legendre polynomials using legval with the identity matrix for the coefficient argument.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib

x = np.linspace(-1, 1, 201)

L = np.polynomial.legendre.legval(x, np.identity(50))

plt.plot(x, L.T)

enter image description here

You can do then do the integral with quadrature. Using gauss-legendre quadrature might be more efficient since the integral of a legendre polynomial will be exact for Ln(x) where n is less than the quadrature size.

import numpy as np    
from numpy.polynomial.legendre import leggauss, legval

def f(x):
    if 0 <= x <= 1:
        return 1
    if -1 <= x <= 0:
        return -1

# of course you could write a vectorized version of
# this particular f(x), but I assume you have a more
# general piecewise function
f = np.vectorize(f)

deg = 100
x, w = leggauss(deg) # len(x) == 100

L = np.polynomial.legendre.legval(x, np.identity(deg))
# Sum L(xi)*f(xi)*wi
integral = (L*(f(x)*w)[None,:]).sum(axis=1)

c = (np.arange(1,51) + 0.5) * integral[1:51]

x_fine = np.linspace(-1, 1, 2001) # 2001 points
Lfine = np.polynomial.legendre.legval(x_fine, np.identity(51))

# sum_1_50 of c(n) * Ln(x_fine)
cLn_sum = (c[:,None] * Lfine[1:51,:]).sum(axis=0)

c = 1.5, 0, -8.75e-1, 0, ... which I think is the result you're looking for.

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How can plot sum(c * p(x) for n in range(1, 51)) where p(x) is the Legendre polynomial or order n? –  dustin Oct 3 '13 at 1:46
    
The rows of L contain L(x) starting with L0 in the first row. You do the sum and plot them. –  Greg Whittier Oct 3 '13 at 8:44
    
The problem I am having is we don't have an n to sum over so how can I sum? –  dustin Oct 3 '13 at 11:40
1  
I don't really understand "we don't have an n to sum over." The nth row of L represents the value of Ln(x) where each column corresponds to a different value of x. I.e., L[n, i] == Ln(x[i]). I've modified the answer to show how to get this sum in numpy. You could also just write a loop. At this point, I'm a little confused about what you're trying to accomplish, but I hope this answers your question. –  Greg Whittier Oct 3 '13 at 15:26
    
Sure you can recalculate L with finer x spacing. There's two ways to do that. You could just increase the degree you use for the integration, which will increase the quadrature points. You can also recalculate L with finer spacing, which I did above. I didn't check to see if the integrate converged, so you may want to increase deg and see if there's any change. –  Greg Whittier Oct 3 '13 at 16:36

You can do your integration like:

import numpy as np
from scipy.integrate import quad

def f(x, coef):
    n = coef[-1]
    p = (2*n+1)/2.*np.polynomial.legendre.Legendre(coef=coef)
    if 0 <= x <= 1:
        return 1*p(x)
    if -1 <= x <= 0:
        return -1*p(x)

c = []
for n in range(1, 51):
    c.append(quad(f, -1, 1, args=range(1,n+1))[0])

And this gives:

print c
#[0.0, 5.0, 6.9999999999999991, 4.5, ... , 62.975635570615466, 64.274102283412574, 77.143785770271251]
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Something isn't write. The first coefficient should be 1.5 but this prints 0, 5, 7, 4.5, .. Also, you will get something slightly different since I forgot to put (2.*n + 1.)/2. in front of the integration in my first post. So I have c.append((2. * n + 1.) / 2. * quad(f, -1, 1, args=range(1,n+1))[0]) –  dustin Oct 2 '13 at 21:34
    
Is this integrating n? If so, that would be the problem. I need to integrate over x –  dustin Oct 2 '13 at 22:41
    
Actually, it is integrating x from -1 to +1. (See quad documentation here)[docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/…. The integrand was wrong in my answer, now I fixed it and it is giving the expected result for c... –  Saullo Castro Oct 3 '13 at 5:15

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