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I am using a class RefreshablePanel that extends JPanel

public class RefreshablePanel extends JPanel {
    static String description="";
    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g){
        g.drawString(description, 10, 11);
}
    void updateDescription(String dataToAppend){    
        description = description.concat("\n").concat(dataToAppend);
       }    
}

JPanel descriptionPanel = new JPanel();
scrollPane_2.setViewportView(descriptionPanel);
descriptionPanel.setBackground(Color.WHITE);
descriptionPanel.setLayout(null);

enter image description here

Now when I do it like this

RefreshablePanel descriptionPanel = new RefreshablePanel();
scrollPane_2.setViewportView(descriptionPanel);
descriptionPanel.setBackground(Color.WHITE);
descriptionPanel.setLayout(null); 

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
In the paintComponent method, always do call super.paintComponent(g), otherwise the panel drawing will not continue after your custom drawing. –  BackSlash Oct 2 '13 at 19:13
    
That custom panel looks like it really should be a standard panel that holds a JLabel (possibly with an empty border, for white space) to display the text. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 2 '13 at 19:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason this has changed is because when you override paintComponent, you must always call super.paintComponent(g) as the first line:

protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
    super.paintComponent(g);
    g.drawString(description, 10, 11);
}

The paintComponent method in the JPanel superclass paints the background, so if you insert super.paintComponent(g), the background will be painted before you paint anything custom.

share|improve this answer
    
@BackSlash Oops. Fixed that now. –  tbodt Oct 2 '13 at 19:18
    
Thanx for the answer, that worked and for that extra knowledge along with what I asked for –  The_Lost_Avatar Oct 2 '13 at 19:19
protected void paintComponent(Graphics g){
        super.paintComponent(g);
        g.drawString(description, 10, 11);
}

You should always invoke super.paintComponent() when you override the paintComponent() method.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you say why? –  tbodt Oct 2 '13 at 19:15
    
yes, that worked , Thanx a lot . –  The_Lost_Avatar Oct 2 '13 at 19:17

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