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I work on a project with many "BusinessException" that embedded errorCode.

In every unit test for exception, I have to test these error code repeating this kind of pattern :


    @Test
    public void zipFileReaderCtorShouldThrowAnExceptionWithInexistingArchive() {
        try {
            zfr = new ZipFileReader("unexpected/path/to/file");
            fail("'BusinessZipException' not throwed");
        } catch (BusinessZipException e) {
            assertThat("Unexpected error code", e.getErrorCode(), is(ErrorCode.FILE_NOT_FOUND));
        } catch (Exception e) {
            fail("Unexpected Exception: '" + e + "', expected: 'BusinessZipException'");
        }
    }

(use of junit annotation is impossible due to error code testing)

I was boring to do this, particularly because I had to copy/paste exception name in fail()'s error message.

So, I wrote a Util class. I use an abstract class to handle exception assert testing.


public abstract class TestExceptionUtil {
    public  void runAndExpectException(Class expectedException, String expectedErrorCode) {
        String failUnexpectedExceptionMessage = "Unexpected exception. Expected is: '%s', but got: '%s'";
        try {
            codeToExecute();
            fail("'" + expectedException.getName() + "' not throwed");
        } catch (BusinessException e) {
            if (e.getClass().equals(expectedException)) {
                assertThat("Exception error code not expected", e.getErrorCode(), is(expectedErrorCode));
            } else {
                fail(String.format(failUnexpectedExceptionMessage, expectedException.getName(), e));
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            fail(String.format(failUnexpectedExceptionMessage, expectedException.getName(), e));
        }
    }

    abstract public void codeToExecute();
}

Then, client use it in this way :


    @Test
    public void zipFileReaderCtorShouldThrowAnExceptionWithInexistingArchive() {
        new TestExceptionUtil() {
            @Override
            public void codeToExecute() {
                zfr = new ZipFileReader("unexpected/path/to/file");
            }
        }.runAndExpectException(BusinessTechnicalException.class, ErrorCode.FILE_NOT_FOUND);
    }

Do you think it's "clean" ? Do you think it can be ameliorated ? Do you think it's too heavy and/or useless ? My primary objective is to uniformize testing exception in our dev team. (and of course factorize code)

Thanks for reading !

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about the JUnit ExpectedException Rule?

First you declare the Rule at the top of the test class:

@Rule
public final ExpectedException ee = ExpectedException.none();

Then in your test method you can declare that you can expect an Exception:

@Test
public void testStuff() {
    ee.expect(IllegalArgumentException.class);
    ee.expectMessage("My Exception text");
}

I think this is significatly cleaner than your approach.

You can then use hamcrest Matchers to match the Exception message:

@Test
public void testStuff() {
    ee.expect(IllegalArgumentException.class);
    ee.expectMessage(containsString("error"));
    ee.expect(hasProperty("errorCode", is(7)));
}

The hasProperty Matcher will look for a getter for the named property and check that it matches the second argument - which is another Matcher.

You can even implement your own Matcher, in which case you will not require a dependency on hamcrest:

public class ErrorCodeMatcher extends BaseMatcher<Throwable> {

    private final int expectedErrorCode;

    public ErrorCodeMatcher(int expectedErrorCode) {
        this.expectedErrorCode = expectedErrorCode;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean matches(Object o) {
        return ((BusinessZipException) o).getErrorCode() == expectedErrorCode;
    }

    @Override
    public void describeTo(Description d) {
        d.appendText("Expected error code was" + expectedErrorCode);
    }
}

This would be used as follows:

ee.expect(new ErrorCodeMatcher(7));

With a static factory method and a static import this can become quite clean:

ee.expect(exceptionWithErrorCode(7));

If you have a common interface that defines your business Exception with a getErrorCode() method, say called ErrorAwareException then you can extend the TypeSafeMatcher<T> class to create slightly cleaner code:

public class ErrorCodeMatcher<T extends Exception & ErrorAwareException> extends TypeSafeMatcher<T> {

    public static <E extends Exception & ErrorAwareException> ErrorCodeMatcher<E> exceptionWithErrorCode(final int expectedErrorCode) {
        return new ErrorCodeMatcher<E>(expectedErrorCode);
    }
    private final int expectedErrorCode;

    public ErrorCodeMatcher(int expectedErrorCode) {
        this.expectedErrorCode = expectedErrorCode;
    }

    @Override
    protected boolean matchesSafely(final T t) {
        return t.getErrorCode() == expectedErrorCode;
    }

    @Override
    public void describeTo(Description d) {
        d.appendText("Expected error code was" + expectedErrorCode);
    }
}

Note that if you do choose to use hamcrest then make sure that you include junit-dep rather than pure junit in your project otherwise the hamcrest classes will clash with the hamcrest classes included with junit. In maven, this will look something like this:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.hamcrest</groupId>
    <artifactId>hamcrest-all</artifactId>
    <version>1.3</version>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>junit</groupId>
    <artifactId>junit-dep</artifactId>
    <version>4.11</version>
    <scope>test</scope> 
</dependency>
share|improve this answer

I think you are actually reinventing the wheel here. You can use either expected parameter of the @Test annotation which causes test method to succeed of given exception was thrown. Or use the ExpectedException rule does basically the same but has more functionality. So try either

@Test(expected = Exception.class)
public void myTest() {
    throw new Exception();
}

or

@Rule
private ExpectedException rule = ExpectedException.none();

@Test
public void myTest() {
    rule.expect(Exception.class);
    throw new Exception();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The OP needs more than just matching the exception by class - this is why the OP thought to resort so that homebrew solution. –  Boris the Spider Oct 2 '13 at 21:10
    
True, I missed that –  Petr Mensik Oct 2 '13 at 21:21
    
yep junit rule is the best way to test exception. More info here weblogs.java.net/blog/johnsmart/archive/2009/09/27/… –  anfy2002us Oct 2 '13 at 21:28

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