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I've been told to write header file to the main.cpp which contains this:

OOP::array tab;

  for(int i = 0; i < rand()%10 + 1; ++i)
  {
    tab.push_back(new BaseClass("BaseClass 1"));
    tab.push_back(new BaseClass("BaseClass 2"));
    tab.push_back(new BaseClass("BaseClass 3"));
  }

  OOP::print_tab_el(tab); //prints tab using operator<< for its elements.

Class array is a container for smart pointers. So I implemented counted_ptr, BaseClass and array (I used std::vector as a container) classes but when I invoke "print_tab_el(tab)" function, I get exclamation mark!

Seems like all of vector's items which are smart pointers contain "!" as name. I never put an "!" there.

Here's my header.

namespace OOP {

    class BaseClass
        {
            public:
                std::string name;

                BaseClass(std::string arg) {name=arg;}

                friend std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream &os, const BaseClass& ref)
                    {
                        os<<ref.name<<"\n"; //gives ! ???
                        return os;
                    }

        };



    class array
        {
            public:
                std::vector <counted_ptr<OOP::BaseClass> > myvec;

                void push_back( OOP::BaseClass *arg)
                    {
                       counted_ptr< OOP::BaseClass> tmp(arg);
                       myvec.push_back(tmp);

                    }

        };



    void print_tab_el(array arr)
         {

            std::vector <counted_ptr<OOP::BaseClass> >::iterator it;

            for (it=arr.myvec.begin();it!=arr.myvec.end();++it){
                 std::cout<<**it;
                }

         }

};

And this is program output:

!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
and some more.

ADDED:

counted_ptr.cpp

#ifndef COUNTED_PTR_CPP
#define COUNTED_PTR_CPP

#include "counted_ptr.h"
#include <iostream>

/****************************************************************************/
template <class T>
counted_ptr<T>::counted_ptr(T* pointer):ptr(pointer)
    {
        refs.addRef();
    }
/****************************************************************************/

template <class T>
counted_ptr<T>::counted_ptr(const counted_ptr& ref):ptr(ref.ptr), refs(ref.refs+1) {}
/****************************************************************************/

template <class T>
counted_ptr<T>::~counted_ptr()
    {
        if (refs.takeRef()==0)
            delete ptr;
    }
/****************************************************************************/

template <class T>
T* counted_ptr<T>::operator->(){
    return ptr;
}
/****************************************************************************/

template <class T>
T& counted_ptr<T>::operator*(){
    return *ptr;
}
/****************************************************************************/

template <class T>
counted_ptr<T>& counted_ptr<T>::operator=(const counted_ptr<T>& rcpt_r){

    if (this!=&rcpt_r)
        {
            if (refs.takeRef()==0)
                delete ptr;

            ptr=rcpt_r.ptr;
            //refs=rcpt_r.refs+1;   
            refs=rcpt_r.refs;
            refs.addRef();      

        }

    return *this;
}
/****************************************************************************/
#endif

counted_ptr.h

#ifndef COUNTED_PTR_H
#define COUNTED_PTR_H

#include "reference.h"
template <class T>
class counted_ptr{

public:
    counted_ptr( T* pointer);
    counted_ptr(const counted_ptr& ref);
    ~counted_ptr();

    T* operator->();
    T& operator*();
    counted_ptr& operator=(const counted_ptr<T>& ref);


private:
    T *ptr;
    reference refs;

};

class testclass{};
#endif

#include "counted_ptr.cpp"

reference.cpp

#include "reference.h"
#include <iostream>

/****************************************************************************/
reference::reference():nr_of_references(0){}
/****************************************************************************/

reference::reference(const int value):nr_of_references(value){}

reference& reference::operator=(const int& ref)
    {
        nr_of_references=ref;
        return *this;
    }
/****************************************************************************/

reference::operator int()const
    {
        return nr_of_references;
    }
/****************************************************************************/

int reference::addRef()
    {
        return ++nr_of_references;
    }
/****************************************************************************/

int reference::takeRef()
    {
        return --nr_of_references;
    }
/****************************************************************************/

reference.h

class reference{
    public:
        reference();
        reference(const int value);
        //reference& operator=(const reference& ref);
        reference& operator=(const int& ref);
        operator int()const;

        int addRef();
        int takeRef();

    private:
        int nr_of_references;

};
share|improve this question
    
I think we need to see a more complete example (in other words, what are you putting into myvec, for example? –  Mats Petersson Oct 2 '13 at 21:09
    
Replacing counted_ptr with a C++11 shared_ptr, it works fine for me. So I'd say the issue is in counted_ptr, whatever that is. –  David Schwartz Oct 2 '13 at 21:13
    
I am not sure I understand you Mats, could you tell me more? @David counted_ptr is my smart pointer class based on counting references. –  user2672883 Oct 2 '13 at 21:13
    
Why is tmp being pushed into myvec 2 times? –  tomi.lee.jones Oct 2 '13 at 21:17
1  
@user2672883 Here's confirmation your code works if you use shared_ptr, almost conclusively showing the issue is in counted_ptr. (And it works with one push_back or two.) –  David Schwartz Oct 2 '13 at 21:18

1 Answer 1

Every instance of counted_ptr has its own instance of reference. Each instance of reference has its own instance of nr_of_references. Although each counter_ptr manages reference properly, the problem is that the counted_ptr that only had a count of 1 will destruct the pointer when it goes out of scope, even after it was copied to a different counted_ptr instance.

Your counted_ptr needs to be redesigned so that all counted_ptrs to the same object also manipulate the same reference.

share|improve this answer
    
Which leads to the question what's the point of creating an array of pointers pointing to the same object? –  tomi.lee.jones Oct 2 '13 at 22:10
    
That's correct, I can see it now. I create object not using new operator but by simply calling constructor which allocates memory probably on heap. That's why I loose objects when exiting push_back function. Thank's a lot to all of you. –  user2672883 Oct 2 '13 at 22:13

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