Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to add a function called computeFrequencies which, given an array with grades, returns a small array with the frequencies distribution of the grades. (this is just part of the whole program)

I made this, however i'm completely new to c, and i'm not sure what I did wrong: Given error: histogramtest2.c:16:10: error: ‘grades’ redeclared as different kind of symbol histogramtest2.c:15:29: note: previous definition of ‘grades’ was here histogramtest2.c:20:12: error: subscripted value is neither array nor pointer nor vector

Can anyone help me? Many thanks

void computeFrequencies(int grades[], int freq[10]){
int i, grades[];
int length=100;

for(i=0; i<length; i++){
 grades[i]=i;
 switch(i){
case 1: freq[1]++;
break;
case 2: freq[2]++;
break;
case 3: freq[3]++;
break;
case 4: freq[4]++;
break;
case 5: freq[5]++;
break;
case 6: freq[6]++;
break;
case 7: freq[7]++;
break;
case 8: freq[8]++;
break;
case 9: freq[9]++;
break;
default: freq[10]++;
}
}
}

Hey thanks for the answers, but even though my errors are gone my program doesn't work. My program needs to show a histogram of the frequencies of certain grades. Can anyone help me?

The inputfile is called 1.in, and contains: 29 6 3 8 6 7 4 8 9 2 10 4 9 5 7 4 8 6 7 2 10 4 1 8 3 6 3 6 9 4

I use ./a.out < 1.in to run

the output should be:

. . . * . * . . . .
. . . * . * . * . .
. . * * . * * * * .
. * * * . * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * *
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int *readGrades() {
int x, count;
    scanf("%d", &count);
int *grades = malloc(count * sizeof(int));
for (x = 0; x < count; ++x) {
    scanf("%d", &grades[x]);
}
return grades;
}

void computeFrequencies(int grades[], int freq[10]){
  int i;
   int length=100;

   for(i=0; i<length; i++){
     grades[i]=i;
     switch(i){
    case 1: freq[1]++;
    break;
    case 2: freq[2]++;
    break;
    case 3: freq[3]++;
    break;
    case 4: freq[4]++;
    break;
    case 5: freq[5]++;
    break;
    case 6: freq[6]++;
    break;
    case 7: freq[7]++;
    break;
    case 8: freq[8]++;
    break;
    case 9: freq[9]++;
    break;
    default: freq[10]++;
    }
  }
}

int arrayMax(int length, int arr[]) {
  int i, max = arr[0];
  for (i=1; i < length; i++) {
    if (arr[i] > max) {
      max = arr[i];
    }
  }
  return max;
}

void printHistogram(int freq[10]){
  int highestGrade = arrayMax(10,freq);
  int x;
  int y;

  for(x=highestGrade; x>0; x--) {
    for(y=1; y<=10; y++) {
      if(freq[y] < highestGrade && x > freq[y]) {
    if(y==10) {
      printf(".\n");
    }
    else {
      printf(". ");
    } 
      } else {
    if(freq[y] <= highestGrade && x <= freq[y]) {
      if(y==10) {
    printf("*\n");
      }
      else {
        printf("* ");
      }   
    }
      }
    }
  }
  printf("\n");
  printf("1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10\n");
}   



int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  int *grades;
  int frequencies[10];

  grades = readGrades();

  computeFrequencies(grades, frequencies);
  arrayMax(10,frequencies);
  printHistogram(frequencies);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
The problem is exactly as the error says: You're redeclaring something that already exists. –  Kerrek SB Oct 2 '13 at 21:16
    
Arrays are starting from zero ... default == segfault case –  LostBoy Oct 2 '13 at 21:16
1  
Instead of switch(x) { case i: foo(i); /* ... */ }, you can simply say foo(x). –  Kerrek SB Oct 2 '13 at 21:17
    
Not sure if anyone has seen the edit =/ –  user2831017 Oct 2 '13 at 21:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are several issues with your code and I will discuss them in order of appearance.

First of all, get rid of the 'magic number' constants which meaning is not immediately obvious from the context (they are often not really constant anyway). For instance the number of buckets in the histogram (10). So I will refer to the number 10 using a symbolic constant NFREQ, that can be defined using the preprocessor macro #define NFREQ 10 after the includes.

Another magic number is 100 in the function that computes frequencies. There is no way to ensure that the number is correct unless we pass it as an argument. This issue affects correctness as it is used in a loop and guards access to memory. If the value is too low, you will miss some data. Conversely, if it is too high, you get undefined behaviour by reading past the end of the array (often manifest as segmentation fault). We will return to this function in a bit. Let's look at readGrades() first.

This is the function that reads in the data and stores the input. This is the place where you -- at run time -- obtain the count parameter (we called length above). As you return the values, you need to find a way to return the count too. You can pass an address to a variable that will hold the value. Alternatively you can define a struct that holds both the data (grades) and the length and return the dynamically allocated and filled struct. So the signature could look like int *readGrades(int* cnt) and inside the function you set *cnt = count.

In turn, computeFrequencies() now takes an extra length argument. You could make the function more generic by passing length of the freq array as another argument.

void computeFrequencies(int grades[], int freq[], int grades_len){
    int i;

    memset(freq, 0, sizeof(freq[0])*NFREQ); // (!) init freq array

    for (i = 0; i < grades_len; ++i) {
        freq[grades[i]-1]++;
    }
}

Don't forget to initialise the freq array. This bug would be easy to catch if you print intermediate result using a simple printf loop or if you inspect the values in a debugger. Here I assume that the grades are from range [1..10] and that the total number of grades is relatively low, otherwise you would need to normalise to the maximum value along the y-axis. So here, in the simple case, we just increase the counter in the bucket corresponding to each grade from the grades array.

Moreover, to make your code more robust, you could add some code to validate user input (what happens if you type a character instead of a number?). Also you should check that malloc doesn't return NULL. If it does, your program was not able to allocate enough memory and should exit with a return value that signifies erroneous behaviour (e.g. EXIT_FAILURE) and print an appropriate error message to inform the user.

The arrayMax() function seems to work fine, provided the length given does match the actual length of the array (you could use a sentinel value instead). It returns the highest frequency of the most common grade.

The function to print histograms can be first corrected and somewhat simplified too. One issue is the notorious out of bounds access (frequency of grade 10 is stored at freq[9]). Remember that the array indices in C start with 0 (hence y < NFREQ, and not <=). The rest of the code is self-documenting.

void printHistogram(int freq[]){
  int x, y, highestGrade = arrayMax(NFREQ, freq); 

  for (x = highestGrade; x > 0; --x) {
      for (y = 0; y < NFREQ; ++y) { 
          if (freq[y] >= x && x <= freq[y])
              printf("* ");
          else
              printf(". ");
          if (y == NFREQ-1)
              printf("\n");
      }
  }
  printf("1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10\n");
}

Finally, you could show discipline and awareness by explicitly releasing the memory that you previously dynamically allocate as soon as it is not needed any longer (before the return statement in main) by calling free(grades);. In your case it is not really an issue as it would have been implicitly released as main function returns.

share|improve this answer

Drop the redeclaration:

int i, grades[];
      ^^^^^^^^^

  • Side note: in your function declaration int freq[10] is misleading since it is equivalent to int freq[]
  • Second note: if freq is indeed 10 elements long freq[10] is out of bounds
  • Third note: the switch is useless - you can use i directly after making sure it is in bounds
share|improve this answer
    
Hey I edited my question, because my program still doesn't work even though I don't have errors anylonger, so the mistake might lie somewhere else, thanks for your answer! –  user2831017 Oct 2 '13 at 21:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.