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Using C# and WPF under .net (rather than WindowsForms or console), what is the correct way to create an application that can only be run as a single instance? I know it has something to do with some mythical thing called a mutex, rarely can I find someone that bothers to stop and explain what one of these are.

The code needs to also inform the already running instance that the user tried to start a second one, and maybe also pass any command line arguments if any existed.

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6  
Doesn't the CLR automatically release any unreleased mutexes when the application terminates anyway? –  Cocowalla Oct 31 '09 at 14:08
    
@Cocowalla: the finalizer should dispose the unmanaged mutexes unless it can't know if the mutex was created by the managed app or attached to an existing one. –  SoMoS May 30 '12 at 9:41
    
Having only one instance of your app is reasonable. But passing arguments to an already existing app appears to me a bit silly. I can't see any reason to do so. If you associate an app with file extension, you should open as many app as user want to open documents. That's the standard behavior which every users would expect. –  Eric Ouellet Dec 5 '13 at 21:36
    
Just want to make correction about my previous state. Passing arguments to an existing app means that you want to do an MDI (multi document interface). I thought that MDI was a way that Microsoft was pushing out (Word and Excel are now SDI). But I realize that Chrome and IE are both MDI. Perharps we are in years where MDI is back ??? (But I still prefer SDI over MDI) –  Eric Ouellet Dec 9 '13 at 13:28
2  
@Cocowalla The CLR does not manage native resources. However, if a process terminates, all handles are freed by the system (the OS, not the CLR). –  IInspectable Jan 1 at 18:53

24 Answers 24

up vote 190 down vote accepted

Here is a very good article regarding the Mutex solution. The approach described by the article is advantageous for two reasons.

First, it does not require a dependency on the Microsoft.VisualBasic assembly. If my project already had a dependency on that assembly, I would probably advocate using the approach shown in the accepted answer. But as it is, I do not use the Microsoft.VisualBasic assembly, and I'd rather not add an unnecessary dependency to my project.

Second, the article shows how to bring the existing instance of the application to the foreground when the user tries to start another instance. That's a very nice touch that the other Mutex solutions described here do not address.


UPDATE

As of 8/1/2014, the article I linked to above is still active, but the blog hasn't been updated in a while. That makes me worry that eventually it might disappear, and with it, the advocated solution. I'm reproducing the content of the article here for posterity. The words belong solely to the blog owner at Sanity Free Coding.

Today I wanted to refactor some code that prohibited my application from running multiple instances of itself.

Previously I had use System.Diagnostics.Process to search for an instance of my myapp.exe in the process list. While this works, it brings on a lot of overhead, and I wanted something cleaner.

Knowing that I could use a mutex for this (but never having done it before) I set out to cut down my code and simplify my life.

In the class of my application main I created a static named Mutex:

static class Program
{
    static Mutex mutex = new Mutex(true, "{8F6F0AC4-B9A1-45fd-A8CF-72F04E6BDE8F}");
    [STAThread]
    ...
}

Having a named mutex allows us to stack synchronization across multiple threads and processes which is just the magic I'm looking for.

Mutex.WaitOne has an overload that specifies an amount of time for us to wait. Since we're not actually wanting to synchronizing our code (more just check if it is currently in use) we use the overload with two parameters: Mutex.WaitOne(Timespan timeout, bool exitContext). Wait one returns true if it is able to enter, and false if it wasn't. In this case, we don't want to wait at all; If our mutex is being used, skip it, and move on, so we pass in TimeSpan.Zero (wait 0 milliseconds), and set the exitContext to true so we can exit the synchronization context before we try to aquire a lock on it. Using this, we wrap our Application.Run code inside something like this:

static class Program
{
    static Mutex mutex = new Mutex(true, "{8F6F0AC4-B9A1-45fd-A8CF-72F04E6BDE8F}");
    [STAThread]
    static void Main() {
        if(mutex.WaitOne(TimeSpan.Zero, true)) {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new Form1());
            mutex.ReleaseMutex();
        } else {
            MessageBox.Show("only one instance at a time");
        }
    }
}

So, if our app is running, WaitOne will return false, and we'll get a message box.

Instead of showing a message box, I opted to utilize a little Win32 to notify my running instance that someone forgot that it was already running (by bringing itself to the top of all the other windows). To achieve this I used PostMessage to broadcast a custom message to every window (the custom message was registered with RegisterWindowMessage by my running application, which means only my application knows what it is) then my second instance exits. The running application instance would receive that notification and process it. In order to do that, I overrode WndProc in my main form and listened for my custom notification. When I received that notification I set the form's TopMost property to true to bring it up on top.

Here is what I ended up with:

  • Program.cs
static class Program
{
    static Mutex mutex = new Mutex(true, "{8F6F0AC4-B9A1-45fd-A8CF-72F04E6BDE8F}");
    [STAThread]
    static void Main() {
        if(mutex.WaitOne(TimeSpan.Zero, true)) {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new Form1());
            mutex.ReleaseMutex();
        } else {
            // send our Win32 message to make the currently running instance
            // jump on top of all the other windows
            NativeMethods.PostMessage(
                (IntPtr)NativeMethods.HWND_BROADCAST,
                NativeMethods.WM_SHOWME,
                IntPtr.Zero,
                IntPtr.Zero);
        }
    }
}
  • NativeMethods.cs
// this class just wraps some Win32 stuff that we're going to use
internal class NativeMethods
{
    public const int HWND_BROADCAST = 0xffff;
    public static readonly int WM_SHOWME = RegisterWindowMessage("WM_SHOWME");
    [DllImport("user32")]
    public static extern bool PostMessage(IntPtr hwnd, int msg, IntPtr wparam, IntPtr lparam);
    [DllImport("user32")]
    public static extern int RegisterWindowMessage(string message);
}
  • Form1.cs (front side partial)
public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }
    protected override void WndProc(ref Message m)
    {
        if(m.Msg == NativeMethods.WM_SHOWME) {
            ShowMe();
        }
        base.WndProc(ref m);
    }
    private void ShowMe()
    {
        if(WindowState == FormWindowState.Minimized) {
            WindowState = FormWindowState.Normal;
        }
        // get our current "TopMost" value (ours will always be false though)
        bool top = TopMost;
        // make our form jump to the top of everything
        TopMost = true;
        // set it back to whatever it was
        TopMost = top;
    }
}
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2  
On the basis that this answer uses less code and less libraries and provides the raise to top functionality, I'm going to make this the new accepted answer. If anyone knows a more correct way to bring the form to the top using API's, feel free to add that. –  Nidonocu Feb 9 '09 at 2:11
7  
@BlueRaja, you start up the first app instance. When you start up the second app instance, it detects that another instance is already running and prepares to shutdown. Before doing so, it sends a "SHOWME" native message to the first instance, which brings the first instance to the top. Events in .NET don't allow cross-process communication, which is why the native message is used. –  Matt Davis May 28 '10 at 21:01
2  
Is there a way to pass the command lines from the other instance, maybe? –  gyurisc Jun 1 '10 at 6:26
7  
@Nam, the Mutex constructor simply requires a string, so you could supply any string name you want, e.g., "This Is My Mutex". Because a 'Mutex' is a system object that is available to other processes, you typically want the name to be unique so it doesn't clash with other 'Mutex' names on the same system. In the article, the cryptic-looking string is a 'Guid'. You can generate this programmatically by calling System.Guid.NewGuid(). In the case of the article, the user probably generated it via Visual Studio as shown here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms241442(VS.80).aspx –  Matt Davis Oct 19 '10 at 14:51
5  
Does the mutex approach assume that the same user is attempting to start the application again? Certainly bringing "the existing instance of the application to the foreground" does not make sense after a 'switch user' –  dumbledad Aug 7 '12 at 14:46

You could use the Mutex class, but you will soon find out that you will need to implement the code to pass the arguments and such yourself. Well, I learned a trick when programming in WinForms when I read Chris Sell's book. This trick uses logic that is already available to us in the framework. I don't know about you, but when I learn about stuff I can reuse in the framework, that is usually the route I take instead of reinventing the wheel. Unless of course it doesn't do everything I want.

When I got into WPF, I came up with a way to use that same code, but in a WPF application. This solution should meet your needs based off your question.

First, we need to create our application class. In this class we are going override the OnStartup event and create a method called Activate, which will be used later.

public class SingleInstanceApplication : System.Windows.Application
{
    protected override void OnStartup(System.Windows.StartupEventArgs e)
    {
        // Call the OnStartup event on our base class
        base.OnStartup(e);

        // Create our MainWindow and show it
        MainWindow window = new MainWindow();
        window.Show();
    }

    public void Activate()
    {
        // Reactivate the main window
        MainWindow.Activate();
    }
}

Second, we will need to create a class that can manage our instances. Before we go through that, we are actually going to reuse some code that is in the Microsoft.VisualBasic assembly. Since, I am using C# in this example, I had to make a reference to the assembly. If you are using VB.NET, you don't have to do anything. The class we are going to use is WindowsFormsApplicationBase and inherit our instance manager off of it and then leverage properties and events to handle the single instancing.

public class SingleInstanceManager : Microsoft.VisualBasic.ApplicationServices.WindowsFormsApplicationBase
{
    private SingleInstanceApplication _application;
    private System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection<string> _commandLine;

    public SingleInstanceManager()
    {
        IsSingleInstance = true;
    }

    protected override bool OnStartup(Microsoft.VisualBasic.ApplicationServices.StartupEventArgs eventArgs)
    {
        // First time _application is launched
        _commandLine = eventArgs.CommandLine;
        _application = new SingleInstanceApplication();
        _application.Run();
        return false;
    }

    protected override void OnStartupNextInstance(StartupNextInstanceEventArgs eventArgs)
    {
        // Subsequent launches
        base.OnStartupNextInstance(eventArgs);
        _commandLine = eventArgs.CommandLine;
        _application.Activate();
    }
}

Basically, we are using the VB bits to detect single instance's and process accordingly. OnStartup will be fired when the first instance loads. OnStartupNextInstance is fired when the application is re-run again. As you can see, I can get to what was passed on the command line through the event arguments. I set the value to an instance field. You could parse the command line here, or you could pass it to your application through the constructor and the call to the Activate method.

Third, it's time to create our EntryPoint. Instead of newing up the application like you would normally do, we are going to take advantage of our SingleInstanceManager.

public class EntryPoint
{
    [STAThread]
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SingleInstanceManager manager = new SingleInstanceManager();
        manager.Run(args);
    }
}

Well, I hope you are able to follow everything and be able use this implementation and make it your own.

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This is the way we do it and I've never been too happy about it because of the dependency on WinForms. –  Bob King Sep 24 '08 at 16:42
3  
I'd stick with the mutex solution because it has nothing to do with forms. –  Steven Sudit Jul 13 '09 at 5:26
1  
I've used this because I had issues with other approaches, but I'm fairly sure it uses remoting under the hood. My app has had two related issues - some customers say it tries to phone home even though they've told it not to. When they look more carefully, the connection is to localhost. Still, they don't initially know that. Also, I can't use remoting for a different purpose (I think?) because it's already being used for this. When I tried the mutex approach, I could then use remoting again. –  Richard Watson Jan 13 '11 at 7:47
1  
Forgive me, but unless I a missing something, you avoided writing 3 lines of code and instead you re-used framework just to write pretty heavy code to do it. So where are the savings? –  greenoldman Aug 13 '11 at 15:31
1  
it's possible do it in winforms? –  Jack Jun 2 '12 at 4:01

From here.

A common use for a cross-process Mutex is to ensure that only instance of a program can run at a time. Here's how it's done:

class OneAtATimePlease {

  // Use a name unique to the application (eg include your company URL)
  static Mutex mutex = new Mutex (false, "oreilly.com OneAtATimeDemo");

  static void Main()
  {
    // Wait 5 seconds if contended – in case another instance
    // of the program is in the process of shutting down.
    if (!mutex.WaitOne(TimeSpan.FromSeconds (5), false))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Another instance of the app is running. Bye!");
        return;
    }

    try
    {    
        Console.WriteLine("Running - press Enter to exit");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
    finally
    {
        mutex.ReleaseMutex();
    }    
  }    
}

A good feature of Mutex is that if the application terminates without ReleaseMutex first being called, the CLR will release the Mutex automatically.

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2  
I've got to say, I like this answer a lot more than the accepted one simply due to the fact that it isn't dependent on WinForms. Personally most of my development has been moving to WPF and I don't want to have to pull in WinForm libraries for something like this. –  Switters Oct 27 '08 at 18:51
    
Of course, to be a full answer, you have to also describe passing the arguments to the other instance :) –  Simon Buchan Nov 28 '08 at 5:32
    
@Jason, good, thanks! But I prefer not passing any timeout. It is so much subjective and depends on so many variables. If you ever want to enable another app to start, just release your mutex quicker.. for example as soon as the user confirm close –  Eric Ouellet Dec 5 '13 at 21:33
    
@EricOuellet: Just about every program that has tabs does this - Photoshop, Sublime Text, Chrome .... If you have a good reason to have a "master" process (say you have a in-proc DB for settings) you might want to have it show UI as if it were a new process too. –  Simon Buchan Dec 6 '13 at 12:09
    
@Simon, you are right. I just question myself about a very old thing... MDI vs SDI (Multi documentinterface vs Single document interface). When you talk about tabs, you refer to MDI. In 1998, a Microsoft book suggests to eliminate every MDI app. Microsoft switched Word, Excel... to SDI which I think it is simplier and better. I understand that Chrome and others (now IE) want back to MDI. I personnaly (based on nothing / personal feelings) that it is still better to open a new app when file assoc is selected. But I understand better the question asked now. Thanks ! –  Eric Ouellet Dec 6 '13 at 16:07

MSDN actually has a sample application for both C# and VB to do exactly this: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms771662(v=VS.90).aspx

The most common and reliable technique for developing single-instance detection is to use the Microsoft .NET Framework remoting infrastructure (System.Remoting). The Microsoft .NET Framework (version 2.0) includes a type, WindowsFormsApplicationBase, which encapsulates the required remoting functionality. To incorporate this type into a WPF application, a type needs to derive from it, and be used as a shim between the application static entry point method, Main, and the WPF application's Application type. The shim detects when an application is first launched, and when subsequent launches are attempted, and yields control the WPF Application type to determine how to process the launches.

  • For C# people just take a deep breath and forget about the whole 'I don't wanna include VisualBasic DLL'. Because of this and what Scott Hanselman says and the fact that this pretty much is the cleanest solution to the problem and is designed by people who know a lot more about the framework than you do.
  • From a usability standpoint the fact is if your user is loading an application and it is already open and you're giving them an error message like 'Another instance of the app is running. Bye' then they're not gonna be a very happy user. You simply MUST (in a GUI application) switch to that application and pass in the arguments provided - or if command line parameters have no meaning then you must pop up the application which may have been minimized.

The framework already has support for this - its just that some idiot named the DLL Microsoft.VisualBasic and it didn't get put into Microsoft.ApplicationUtils or something like that. Get over it - or open up Reflector.

Tip: If you use this approach exactly as is, and you already have an App.xaml with resources etc. you'll want to take a look at this too.

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2  
I prefer your answer to be the selected one :) –  Nam G VU Oct 20 '10 at 3:42
    
Thank you for including the 'take a look at this too' link. That's exactly what I needed. By the way, solution #3 in your link is the best one. –  Eternal21 Nov 16 '12 at 19:54
1  
Excellent answer. This should be the selected answer. –  Rick Glos Jun 14 '13 at 16:32

This code should go to the main method. Look at here for more information about the main method in WPF.

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern Boolean ShowWindow(IntPtr hWnd, Int32 nCmdShow);

private const int SW_SHOWMAXIMIZED = 3;

static void Main() 
{
    Process currentProcess = Process.GetCurrentProcess();
    var runningProcess = (from process in Process.GetProcesses()
                          where
                            process.Id != currentProcess.Id &&
                            process.ProcessName.Equals(
                              currentProcess.ProcessName,
                              StringComparison.Ordinal)
                          select process).FirstOrDefault();
    if (runningProcess != null)
    {
        ShowWindow(runningProcess.MainWindowHandle, SW_SHOWMAXIMIZED);
       return; 
    }
}

Method 2

static void Main()
{
    string procName = Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName;
    // get the list of all processes by that name

    Process[] processes=Process.GetProcessesByName(procName);

    if (processes.Length > 1)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(procName + " already running");  
        return;
    } 
    else
    {
        // Application.Run(...);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I find your Method 2 very clean and simple. Thanks! –  Janman Feb 4 '13 at 18:33
    
Method 1 has a nice touch -- it puts focus onto the running app. –  jm. Aug 20 '13 at 21:19
    
Method 2 will not work if run as administrator –  Ranjith Venkatesh Oct 21 '13 at 15:25

Here is a new one that uses Mutex and IPC stuff, and also passes any command line args to the running instance:

http://blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/arik/archive/2010/05/28/wpf-single-instance-application.aspx

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1  
+1 Comparing all the different solutions, I'm going to give this a try. Sounds promising. –  Martin Buberl Feb 1 '11 at 19:31
    
I use this with great success. If you incorporate NamedPipes with this, you can also pass command-line arguments to the original application. The class, 'SingleInstance.cs', was written by Microsoft. I have added another link to a more readable version of Arik Poznanski's blog on CodeProject. –  Heliac Feb 26 at 12:08

Well, I have a disposable Class for this that works easily for most use cases:

Use it like this:

static void Main()
{
    using (SingleInstanceMutex sim = new SingleInstanceMutex())
    {
        if (sim.IsOtherInstanceRunning)
        {
            Application.Exit();
        }

        // Initialize program here.
    }
}

Here it is:

/// <summary>
/// Represents a <see cref="SingleInstanceMutex"/> class.
/// </summary>
public partial class SingleInstanceMutex
{
    #region Fields

    /// <summary>
    /// Indicator whether another instance of this application is running or not.
    /// </summary>
    private bool isNoOtherInstanceRunning;

    /// <summary>
    /// The <see cref="Mutex"/> used to ask for other instances of this application.
    /// </summary>
    private Mutex singleInstanceMutex = null;

    /// <summary>
    /// An indicator whether this object is beeing actively disposed or not.
    /// </summary>
    private bool disposed;

    #endregion

    #region Constructor

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="SingleInstanceMutex"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    public SingleInstanceMutex()
    {
        this.singleInstanceMutex = new Mutex(true, Assembly.GetCallingAssembly().FullName, out this.isNoOtherInstanceRunning);
    }

    #endregion

    #region Properties

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets an indicator whether another instance of the application is running or not.
    /// </summary>
    public bool IsOtherInstanceRunning
    {
        get
        {
            return !this.isNoOtherInstanceRunning;
        }
    }

    #endregion

    #region Methods

    /// <summary>
    /// Closes the <see cref="SingleInstanceMutex"/>.
    /// </summary>
    public void Close()
    {
        this.ThrowIfDisposed();
        this.singleInstanceMutex.Close();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        this.Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    private void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.disposed)
        {
            /* Release unmanaged ressources */

            if (disposing)
            {
                /* Release managed ressources */
                this.Close();
            }

            this.disposed = true;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Throws an exception if something is tried to be done with an already disposed object.
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// All public methods of the class must first call this.
    /// </remarks>
    public void ThrowIfDisposed()
    {
        if (this.disposed)
        {
            throw new ObjectDisposedException(this.GetType().Name);
        }
    }

    #endregion
}
share|improve this answer
    
this one was pretty easy to get working. It would not close the second application until I changed Application.Exit(); to a simple return; but other than that its great. Although i admit I am going to look at the previous solution closer since it uses an interface. blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/arik/archive/2010/05/28/… –  Hal Diggs Aug 12 '11 at 19:10

You should never use a named mutex to implement a single instance application (or at least not for production code). Malicious code can easily DOS(Denial of Service) your ass...

share|improve this answer
2  
"You should never use a named mutex" - never say never. If malicious code is running on my machine, I'm probably already hosed. –  Joe Jul 17 '09 at 20:29
    
Actually it doesn't even have to be malicious code. It could just be a accidental name collision. –  Matt Davison Jul 21 '09 at 17:52
    
Then what should you do? –  Kevin Berridge Oct 23 '09 at 21:11
    
The better question is what possible reason would you want that behavior. Don't design your app as a single instance application=). I know that's a lame answer but from a design standpoint it is almost always the correct answer. Without knowing more about the app its hard to say much more. –  Matt Davison Oct 24 '09 at 11:32
1  
At least under Windows, Mutexes have access control, so one one can toy with your object. As to name collisions themselves, that's why UUID/GUID's where invented. –  NuSkooler Oct 12 '10 at 16:59

So many answers to such a seemingly simple question. Just to shake things up a little bit here is my solution to this problem.

Creating a Mutex can be troublesome because the JIT-er only sees you using it for a small portion of your code and wants to mark it as ready for garbage collection. It pretty much wants to out-smart you thinking you are not going to be using that Mutex for that long. In reality you want to hang onto this Mutex for as long as your application is running. The best way to tell the garbage collector to leave you Mutex alone is to tell it to keep it alive though out the different generations of garage collection. Example:

var m = new Mutex(...);
...
GC.KeepAlive(m);

I lifted the idea from this page: http://www.ai.uga.edu/~mc/SingleInstance.html

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't it be easier to store a shared copy of it in the application class? –  rossisdead May 26 '10 at 4:21

The code C# .NET Single Instance Application that is the reference for the marked answer is a great start.

However, I found it doesn't handle very well the cases when the instance that already exist has a modal dialog open, whether that dialog is a managed one (like another Form such as an about box), or an unmanaged one (like the OpenFileDialog even when using the standard .NET class). With the original code, the main form is activated, but the modal one stays unactive, which looks strange, plus the user must click on it to keep using the app.

So, I have create a SingleInstance utility class to handle all this quite automatically for Winforms and WPF applications.

Winforms:

1) modify the Program class like this:

static class Program
{
    public static readonly SingleInstance Singleton = new SingleInstance(typeof(Program).FullName);

    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // NOTE: if this always return false, close & restart Visual Studio
        // this is probably due to the vshost.exe thing
        Singleton.RunFirstInstance(() =>
        {
            SingleInstanceMain(args);
        });
    }

    public static void SingleInstanceMain(string[] args)
    {
        // standard code that was in Main now goes here
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
        Application.Run(new Form1());
    }
}

2) modify the main window class like this:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    protected override void WndProc(ref Message m)
    {
        // if needed, the singleton will restore this window
        Program.Singleton.OnWndProc(this, m, true);

        // TODO: handle specific messages here if needed
        base.WndProc(ref m);
    }
}

WPF:

1) modify the App page like this (and make sure you set its build action to page to be able to redefine the Main method):

public partial class App : Application
{
    public static readonly SingleInstance Singleton = new SingleInstance(typeof(App).FullName);

    [STAThread]
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // NOTE: if this always return false, close & restart Visual Studio
        // this is probably due to the vshost.exe thing
        Singleton.RunFirstInstance(() =>
        {
            SingleInstanceMain(args);
        });
    }

    public static void SingleInstanceMain(string[] args)
    {
        // standard code that was in Main now goes here
        App app = new App();
        app.InitializeComponent();
        app.Run();
    }
}

2) modify the main window class like this:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    private HwndSource _source;

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    protected override void OnSourceInitialized(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnSourceInitialized(e);
        _source = (HwndSource)PresentationSource.FromVisual(this);
        _source.AddHook(HwndSourceHook);
    }

    protected virtual IntPtr HwndSourceHook(IntPtr hwnd, int msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, ref bool handled)
    {
        // if needed, the singleton will restore this window
        App.Singleton.OnWndProc(hwnd, msg, wParam, lParam, true, true);

        // TODO: handle other specific message
        return IntPtr.Zero;
    }

And here is the utility class:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Threading;

namespace SingleInstanceUtilities
{
    public sealed class SingleInstance
    {
        private const int HWND_BROADCAST = 0xFFFF;

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        private static extern bool PostMessage(IntPtr hwnd, int msg, IntPtr wparam, IntPtr lparam);

        [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
        private static extern int RegisterWindowMessage(string message);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        private static extern bool SetForegroundWindow(IntPtr hWnd);

        public SingleInstance(string uniqueName)
        {
            if (uniqueName == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("uniqueName");

            Mutex = new Mutex(true, uniqueName);
            Message = RegisterWindowMessage("WM_" + uniqueName);
        }

        public Mutex Mutex { get; private set; }
        public int Message { get; private set; }

        public void RunFirstInstance(Action action)
        {
            RunFirstInstance(action, IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero);
        }

        // NOTE: if this always return false, close & restart Visual Studio
        // this is probably due to the vshost.exe thing
        public void RunFirstInstance(Action action, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam)
        {
            if (action == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

            if (WaitForMutext(wParam, lParam))
            {
                try
                {
                    action();
                }
                finally
                {
                    ReleaseMutex();
                }
            }
        }

        public static void ActivateWindow(IntPtr hwnd)
        {
            if (hwnd == IntPtr.Zero)
                return;

            FormUtilities.ActivateWindow(FormUtilities.GetModalWindow(hwnd));
        }

        public void OnWndProc(IntPtr hwnd, int m, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, bool restorePlacement, bool activate)
        {
            if (m == Message)
            {
                if (restorePlacement)
                {
                    WindowPlacement placement = WindowPlacement.GetPlacement(hwnd, false);
                    if (placement.IsValid && placement.IsMinimized)
                    {
                        const int SW_SHOWNORMAL = 1;
                        placement.ShowCmd = SW_SHOWNORMAL;
                        placement.SetPlacement(hwnd);
                    }
                }

                if (activate)
                {
                    SetForegroundWindow(hwnd);
                    FormUtilities.ActivateWindow(FormUtilities.GetModalWindow(hwnd));
                }
            }
        }

#if WINFORMS // define this for Winforms apps
        public void OnWndProc(System.Windows.Forms.Form form, int m, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, bool activate)
        {
            if (form == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("form");

            if (m == Message)
            {
                if (activate)
                {
                    if (form.WindowState == System.Windows.Forms.FormWindowState.Minimized)
                    {
                        form.WindowState = System.Windows.Forms.FormWindowState.Normal;
                    }

                    form.Activate();
                    FormUtilities.ActivateWindow(FormUtilities.GetModalWindow(form.Handle));
                }
            }
        }

        public void OnWndProc(System.Windows.Forms.Form form, System.Windows.Forms.Message m, bool activate)
        {
            if (form == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("form");

            OnWndProc(form, m.Msg, m.WParam, m.LParam, activate);
        }
#endif

        public void ReleaseMutex()
        {
            Mutex.ReleaseMutex();
        }

        public bool WaitForMutext(bool force, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam)
        {
            bool b = PrivateWaitForMutext(force);
            if (!b)
            {
                PostMessage((IntPtr)HWND_BROADCAST, Message, wParam, lParam);
            }
            return b;
        }

        public bool WaitForMutext(IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam)
        {
            return WaitForMutext(false, wParam, lParam);
        }

        private bool PrivateWaitForMutext(bool force)
        {
            if (force)
                return true;

            try
            {
                return Mutex.WaitOne(TimeSpan.Zero, true);
            }
            catch (AbandonedMutexException)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
    }

    // NOTE: don't add any field or public get/set property, as this must exactly map to Windows' WINDOWPLACEMENT structure
    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    public struct WindowPlacement
    {
        public int Length { get; set; }
        public int Flags { get; set; }
        public int ShowCmd { get; set; }
        public int MinPositionX { get; set; }
        public int MinPositionY { get; set; }
        public int MaxPositionX { get; set; }
        public int MaxPositionY { get; set; }
        public int NormalPositionLeft { get; set; }
        public int NormalPositionTop { get; set; }
        public int NormalPositionRight { get; set; }
        public int NormalPositionBottom { get; set; }

        [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
        private static extern bool SetWindowPlacement(IntPtr hWnd, ref WindowPlacement lpwndpl);

        [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
        private static extern bool GetWindowPlacement(IntPtr hWnd, ref WindowPlacement lpwndpl);

        private const int SW_SHOWMINIMIZED = 2;

        public bool IsMinimized
        {
            get
            {
                return ShowCmd == SW_SHOWMINIMIZED;
            }
        }

        public bool IsValid
        {
            get
            {
                return Length == Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(WindowPlacement));
            }
        }

        public void SetPlacement(IntPtr windowHandle)
        {
            SetWindowPlacement(windowHandle, ref this);
        }

        public static WindowPlacement GetPlacement(IntPtr windowHandle, bool throwOnError)
        {
            WindowPlacement placement = new WindowPlacement();
            if (windowHandle == IntPtr.Zero)
                return placement;

            placement.Length = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(WindowPlacement));
            if (!GetWindowPlacement(windowHandle, ref placement))
            {
                if (throwOnError)
                    throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());

                return new WindowPlacement();
            }
            return placement;
        }
    }

    public static class FormUtilities
    {
        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        private static extern IntPtr GetWindow(IntPtr hWnd, int uCmd);

        [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
        private static extern IntPtr SetActiveWindow(IntPtr hWnd);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        private static extern bool IsWindowVisible(IntPtr hWnd);

        [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
        public static extern int GetCurrentThreadId();

        private delegate bool EnumChildrenCallback(IntPtr hwnd, IntPtr lParam);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        private static extern bool EnumThreadWindows(int dwThreadId, EnumChildrenCallback lpEnumFunc, IntPtr lParam);

        private class ModalWindowUtil
        {
            private const int GW_OWNER = 4;
            private int _maxOwnershipLevel;
            private IntPtr _maxOwnershipHandle;

            private bool EnumChildren(IntPtr hwnd, IntPtr lParam)
            {
                int level = 1;
                if (IsWindowVisible(hwnd) && IsOwned(lParam, hwnd, ref level))
                {
                    if (level > _maxOwnershipLevel)
                    {
                        _maxOwnershipHandle = hwnd;
                        _maxOwnershipLevel = level;
                    }
                }
                return true;
            }

            private static bool IsOwned(IntPtr owner, IntPtr hwnd, ref int level)
            {
                IntPtr o = GetWindow(hwnd, GW_OWNER);
                if (o == IntPtr.Zero)
                    return false;

                if (o == owner)
                    return true;

                level++;
                return IsOwned(owner, o, ref level);
            }

            public static void ActivateWindow(IntPtr hwnd)
            {
                if (hwnd != IntPtr.Zero)
                {
                    SetActiveWindow(hwnd);
                }
            }

            public static IntPtr GetModalWindow(IntPtr owner)
            {
                ModalWindowUtil util = new ModalWindowUtil();
                EnumThreadWindows(GetCurrentThreadId(), util.EnumChildren, owner);
                return util._maxOwnershipHandle; // may be IntPtr.Zero
            }
        }

        public static void ActivateWindow(IntPtr hwnd)
        {
            ModalWindowUtil.ActivateWindow(hwnd);
        }

        public static IntPtr GetModalWindow(IntPtr owner)
        {
            return ModalWindowUtil.GetModalWindow(owner);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Just some thoughts: There are cases when requiring that only one instance of an application is not "lame" as some would have you believe. Database apps, etc. are an order of magnitude more difficult if one allows multiple instances of the app for a single user to access a database (you know, all that updating all the records that are open in multiple instances of the app on the users machine, etc.). First, for the "name collision thing, don't use a human readable name - use a GUID instead or, even better a GUID + the human readable name. Chances of name collision just dropped off the radar and the Mutex doesn't care. As someone pointed out, a DOS attack would suck, but if the malicious person has gone to the trouble of getting the mutex name and incorporating it into their app, you are pretty much a target anyway and will have to do MUCH more to protect yourself than just fiddle a mutex name. Also, if one uses the variant of: new Mutex(true, "some GUID plus Name", out AIsFirstInstance), you already have your indicator as to whether or not the Mutex is the first instance.

share|improve this answer

See my solution for this problem...

share|improve this answer
1  
Very interesting solution. Sadly the comments seems to be a bit neglected? –  Anders Rune Jensen Apr 28 '10 at 7:38
    
i agree - interesting solution –  denis morozov May 30 '13 at 14:38

It looks like there is a really good way to handle this.

http://blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/arik/archive/2010/05/28/wpf-single-instance-application.aspx

This provides a class you can add that manages all the mutex and messaging cruff to simplify the your implementation to the point where it's simply trivial.

share|improve this answer
    
This didn't seem to bring the existing window to the foreground when I tried it. –  RandomEngy Oct 29 '12 at 2:08

The following code is my WCF named pipes solution to register a single instance application. It's nice because it also raises an event when another instance attempts to start, and receives the command line of the other instance.

It's geared toward WPF because it uses the System.Windows.StartupEventHandler class, but this could be easily modified.

This code requires a reference to PresentationFramework, and System.ServiceModel.

Usage:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var applicationId = new Guid("b54f7b0d-87f9-4df9-9686-4d8fd76066dc");

        if (SingleInstanceManager.VerifySingleInstance(applicationId))
        {
            SingleInstanceManager.OtherInstanceStarted += OnOtherInstanceStarted;

            // start the application
        }
    }

    static void OnOtherInstanceStarted(object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
    {
        // Do something in response to another instance starting up.
    }
}

Source Code:

/// <summary>
/// A class to use for single-instance applications.
/// </summary>
public static class SingleInstanceManager
{
  /// <summary>
  /// Raised when another instance attempts to start up.
  /// </summary>
  public static event StartupEventHandler OtherInstanceStarted;

  /// <summary>
  /// Checks to see if this instance is the first instance running on this machine.  If it is not, this method will
  /// send the main instance this instance's startup information.
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="guid">The application's unique identifier.</param>
  /// <returns>True if this instance is the main instance.</returns>
  public static bool VerifySingleInstace(Guid guid)
  {
    if (!AttemptPublishService(guid))
    {
      NotifyMainInstance(guid);

      return false;
    }

    return true;
  }

  /// <summary>
  /// Attempts to publish the service.
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="guid">The application's unique identifier.</param>
  /// <returns>True if the service was published successfully.</returns>
  private static bool AttemptPublishService(Guid guid)
  {
    try
    {
      ServiceHost serviceHost = new ServiceHost(typeof(SingleInstance));
      NetNamedPipeBinding binding = new NetNamedPipeBinding(NetNamedPipeSecurityMode.None);
      serviceHost.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(ISingleInstance), binding, CreateAddress(guid));
      serviceHost.Open();

      return true;
    }
    catch
    {
      return false;
    }
  }

  /// <summary>
  /// Notifies the main instance that this instance is attempting to start up.
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="guid">The application's unique identifier.</param>
  private static void NotifyMainInstance(Guid guid)
  {
    NetNamedPipeBinding binding = new NetNamedPipeBinding(NetNamedPipeSecurityMode.None);
    EndpointAddress remoteAddress = new EndpointAddress(CreateAddress(guid));
    using (ChannelFactory<ISingleInstance> factory = new ChannelFactory<ISingleInstance>(binding, remoteAddress))
    {
      ISingleInstance singleInstance = factory.CreateChannel();
      singleInstance.NotifyMainInstance(Environment.GetCommandLineArgs());
    }
  }

  /// <summary>
  /// Creates an address to publish/contact the service at based on a globally unique identifier.
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="guid">The identifier for the application.</param>
  /// <returns>The address to publish/contact the service.</returns>
  private static string CreateAddress(Guid guid)
  {
    return string.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, "net.pipe://localhost/{0}", guid);
  }

  /// <summary>
  /// The interface that describes the single instance service.
  /// </summary>
  [ServiceContract]
  private interface ISingleInstance
  {
    /// <summary>
    /// Notifies the main instance that another instance of the application attempted to start.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="args">The other instance's command-line arguments.</param>
    [OperationContract]
    void NotifyMainInstance(string[] args);
  }

  /// <summary>
  /// The implementation of the single instance service interface.
  /// </summary>
  private class SingleInstance : ISingleInstance
  {
    /// <summary>
    /// Notifies the main instance that another instance of the application attempted to start.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="args">The other instance's command-line arguments.</param>
    public void NotifyMainInstance(string[] args)
    {
      if (OtherInstanceStarted != null)
      {
        Type type = typeof(StartupEventArgs);
        ConstructorInfo constructor = type.GetConstructor(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic, null, Type.EmptyTypes, null);
        StartupEventArgs e = (StartupEventArgs)constructor.Invoke(null);
        FieldInfo argsField = type.GetField("_args", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
        Debug.Assert(argsField != null);
        argsField.SetValue(e, args);

        OtherInstanceStarted(null, e);
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is what I use. It combined process enumeration to perform switching and mutex to safeguard from "active clickers":

public partial class App
{
    [DllImport("user32")]
    private static extern int OpenIcon(IntPtr hWnd);

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    private static extern bool SetForegroundWindow(IntPtr hWnd);

    protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnStartup(e);
        var p = Process
           .GetProcessesByName(Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName);
            foreach (var t in p.Where(t => t.MainWindowHandle != IntPtr.Zero))
            {
                OpenIcon(t.MainWindowHandle);
                SetForegroundWindow(t.MainWindowHandle);
                Current.Shutdown();
                return;
            }

            // there is a chance the user tries to click on the icon repeatedly
            // and the process cannot be discovered yet
            bool createdNew;
            var mutex = new Mutex(true, "MyAwesomeApp", 
               out createdNew);  // must be a variable, though it is unused - 
            // we just need a bit of time until the process shows up
            if (!createdNew)
            {
                Current.Shutdown();
                return;
            }

            new Bootstrapper().Run();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Here is an example that allows you to have a single instance of an application. When any new instances load, they pass their arguments to the main instance that is running.

public partial class App : Application
{
    private static Mutex SingleMutex;
    public static uint MessageId;

    private void Application_Startup(object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
    {
        IntPtr Result;
        IntPtr SendOk;
        Win32.COPYDATASTRUCT CopyData;
        string[] Args;
        IntPtr CopyDataMem;
        bool AllowMultipleInstances = false;

        Args = Environment.GetCommandLineArgs();

        // TODO: Replace {00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000} with your application's GUID
        MessageId   = Win32.RegisterWindowMessage("{00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000}");
        SingleMutex = new Mutex(false, "AppName");

        if ((AllowMultipleInstances) || (!AllowMultipleInstances &amp;&amp; SingleMutex.WaitOne(1, true)))
            {
            new Main();
            }
        else if (Args.Length > 1)
            {
            foreach (Process Proc in Process.GetProcesses())
                {
                SendOk = Win32.SendMessageTimeout(Proc.MainWindowHandle, MessageId, IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero,
                    Win32.SendMessageTimeoutFlags.SMTO_BLOCK | Win32.SendMessageTimeoutFlags.SMTO_ABORTIFHUNG,
                    2000, out Result);

                if (SendOk == IntPtr.Zero)
                    continue;
                if ((uint)Result != MessageId)
                    continue;

                CopyDataMem = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(Win32.COPYDATASTRUCT)));

                CopyData.dwData = IntPtr.Zero;
                CopyData.cbData = Args[1].Length*2;
                CopyData.lpData = Marshal.StringToHGlobalUni(Args[1]);

                Marshal.StructureToPtr(CopyData, CopyDataMem, false);

                Win32.SendMessageTimeout(Proc.MainWindowHandle, Win32.WM_COPYDATA, IntPtr.Zero, CopyDataMem,
                    Win32.SendMessageTimeoutFlags.SMTO_BLOCK | Win32.SendMessageTimeoutFlags.SMTO_ABORTIFHUNG,
                    5000, out Result);

                Marshal.FreeHGlobal(CopyData.lpData);
                Marshal.FreeHGlobal(CopyDataMem);
                }

            Shutdown(0);
            }
    }
}

public partial class Main : Window
{
    private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        HwndSource Source;

        Source = HwndSource.FromHwnd(new WindowInteropHelper(this).Handle);
        Source.AddHook(new HwndSourceHook(Window_Proc));
    }

    private IntPtr Window_Proc(IntPtr hWnd, int Msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, ref bool Handled)
    {
        Win32.COPYDATASTRUCT CopyData;
        string Path;

        if (Msg == Win32.WM_COPYDATA)
            {
            CopyData = (Win32.COPYDATASTRUCT)Marshal.PtrToStructure(lParam, typeof(Win32.COPYDATASTRUCT));
            Path = Marshal.PtrToStringUni(CopyData.lpData, CopyData.cbData / 2); 

            if (WindowState == WindowState.Minimized)
                {
                // Restore window from tray
                }

            // Do whatever we want with information

            Activate();
            Focus();
            }

        if (Msg == App.MessageId)
            {
            Handled = true;
            return new IntPtr(App.MessageId);
            }

        return IntPtr.Zero;
    }
}


public class Win32
{
    public const uint WM_COPYDATA = 0x004A;

    public struct COPYDATASTRUCT
    {
        public IntPtr dwData;
        public int    cbData;
        public IntPtr lpData;
    }

    [Flags]
    public enum SendMessageTimeoutFlags : uint
    {
        SMTO_NORMAL             = 0x0000,
        SMTO_BLOCK              = 0x0001,
        SMTO_ABORTIFHUNG        = 0x0002,
        SMTO_NOTIMEOUTIFNOTHUNG = 0x0008
    }

    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError=true, CharSet=CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern uint RegisterWindowMessage(string lpString);
    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    public static extern IntPtr SendMessageTimeout(IntPtr hWnd, uint Msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam,
        SendMessageTimeoutFlags fuFlags, uint uTimeout, out IntPtr lpdwResult);
}

Please don't crucify me if this is too much code.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a really nice example of what I what to do. Nathan, are all the args sent using this method? I have 7 or so in my app and i think that this code will work. –  kevp May 30 '12 at 16:05
    
In my example, only the first argument is sent, but it can be changed so that all of them are sent. –  Nathan Moinvaziri Jun 4 '12 at 5:35

A good solution by WPF disciple Daniel Vaughan, using memory mapped files for IPC is here: http://danielvaughan.org/post/Enforcing-Single-Instance-WPF-Applications.aspx

share|improve this answer

I found the simpler solution, similar to Dale Ragan's, but slightly modified. It does practically everything you need and based on the standard Microsoft WindowsFormsApplicationBase class.

Firstly, you create SingleInstanceController class, which you can use in all other single-instance applications, which use Windows Forms:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using Microsoft.VisualBasic.ApplicationServices;


namespace SingleInstanceController_NET
{
    public class SingleInstanceController
    : WindowsFormsApplicationBase
    {
        public delegate Form CreateMainForm();
        public delegate void StartNextInstanceDelegate(Form mainWindow);
        CreateMainForm formCreation;
        StartNextInstanceDelegate onStartNextInstance;
        public SingleInstanceController(CreateMainForm formCreation, StartNextInstanceDelegate onStartNextInstance)
        {
            // Set whether the application is single instance
            this.formCreation = formCreation;
            this.onStartNextInstance = onStartNextInstance;
            this.IsSingleInstance = true;

            this.StartupNextInstance += new StartupNextInstanceEventHandler(this_StartupNextInstance);                      
        }

        void this_StartupNextInstance(object sender, StartupNextInstanceEventArgs e)
        {
            if (onStartNextInstance != null)
            {
                onStartNextInstance(this.MainForm); // This code will be executed when the user tries to start the running program again,
                                                    // for example, by clicking on the exe file.
            }                                       // This code can determine how to re-activate the existing main window of the running application.
        }

        protected override void OnCreateMainForm()
        {
            // Instantiate your main application form
            this.MainForm = formCreation();
        }

        public void Run()
        {
            string[] commandLine = new string[0];
            base.Run(commandLine);
        }
    }
}

Then you can use it in your program as follows:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using SingleInstanceController_NET;

namespace SingleInstance
{
    static class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        static Form CreateForm()
        {
            return new Form1(); // Form1 is used for the main window.
        }

        static void OnStartNextInstance(Form mainWindow) // When the user tries to restart the application again,
                                                         // the main window is activated again.
        {
            mainWindow.WindowState = FormWindowState.Maximized;
        }
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);            
            SingleInstanceController controller = new SingleInstanceController(CreateForm, OnStartNextInstance);
            controller.Run();         
        }
    }
}

Both the program and the SingleInstanceController_NET solution should reference Microsoft.VisualBasic . If you just want to reactivate the running application as a normal window when the user tries to restart the running program, the second parameter in the SingleInstanceController can be null. In the given example, the window is maximized.

share|improve this answer

Normally, this is the code I use for single instance winform applications:

[STAThread]
public static void Main()
{
    String assemblyName = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Name;

    using (Mutex mutex = new Mutex(false, assemblyName))
    {
        if (!mutex.WaitOne(0, false))
        {
            Boolean shownProcess = false;
            Process currentProcess = Process.GetCurrentProcess();

            foreach (Process process in Process.GetProcessesByName(currentProcess.ProcessName))
            {
                if (!process.Id.Equals(currentProcess.Id) && process.MainModule.FileName.Equals(currentProcess.MainModule.FileName) && !process.MainWindowHandle.Equals(IntPtr.Zero))
                {
                    IntPtr windowHandle = process.MainWindowHandle;

                    if (NativeMethods.IsIconic(windowHandle))
                        NativeMethods.ShowWindow(windowHandle, ShowWindowCommand.Restore);

                    NativeMethods.SetForegroundWindow(windowHandle);

                    shownProcess = true;
                }
            }

            if (!shownProcess)
                MessageBox.Show(String.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, "An instance of {0} is already running!", assemblyName), assemblyName, MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Asterisk, MessageBoxDefaultButton.Button1, (MessageBoxOptions)0);
        }
        else
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new Form());
        }
    }
}

Where native components are:

[DllImport("User32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true, SetLastError = true)]
[return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
internal static extern Boolean IsIconic([In] IntPtr windowHandle);

[DllImport("User32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true, SetLastError = true)]
[return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
internal static extern Boolean SetForegroundWindow([In] IntPtr windowHandle);

[DllImport("User32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true, SetLastError = true)]
[return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
internal static extern Boolean ShowWindow([In] IntPtr windowHandle, [In] ShowWindowCommand command);

public enum ShowWindowCommand : int
{
    Hide                   = 0x0,
    ShowNormal             = 0x1,
    ShowMinimized          = 0x2,
    ShowMaximized          = 0x3,
    ShowNormalNotActive    = 0x4,
    Minimize               = 0x6,
    ShowMinimizedNotActive = 0x7,
    ShowCurrentNotActive   = 0x8,
    Restore                = 0x9,
    ShowDefault            = 0xA,
    ForceMinimize          = 0xB
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem by this implementation is that you can't provide any command-line arguments from the second instance back to the first one. For a better explanation look here. –  Oliver Jan 15 '13 at 12:28

look at this code.great and simple solution about prevent multiple instance of wpf app

 private void Application_Startup(object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
        {
            Process thisProc = Process.GetCurrentProcess();
            if (Process.GetProcessesByName(thisProc.ProcessName).Length > 1)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Application running");
                Application.Current.Shutdown();
                return;
            }

            var wLogin = new LoginWindow();

            if (wLogin.ShowDialog() == true)
            {
                var wMain = new Main();
                wMain.WindowState = WindowState.Maximized;
                wMain.Show();
            }
            else
            {
                Application.Current.Shutdown();
            }      
        }
share|improve this answer

Use mutex solution:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Threading;

namespace OneAndOnlyOne
{
static class Program
{
    static String _mutexID = " // generate guid"
    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);

        Boolean _isNotRunning;
        using (Mutex _mutex = new Mutex(true, _mutexID, out _isNotRunning))
        {
            if (_isNotRunning)
            {
                Application.Run(new Form1());
            }
            else
            {
                MessageBox.Show("An instance is already running.");
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer

Just as reference, this is how I did without passing arguments (which I can't find any reason to do so... I mean a single app with arguments that as to be passed out from one instance to another one). If file association is required, then an app should (per users standard expectation) be instanciated for each doc. If you have to pass args to existing app, I think I would used vb dll.

Not passing args (just single instance app), I prefer not registering a new Window message and not override the message loop as defined in Matt Davis Solution. Although it's not a big deal to add a VisualBasic dll, but I prefer not add a new reference just to do single instance app. Also, I do prefer instanciate a new class with Main instead of calling Shutdown from App.Startup override to ensure to exit as soon as possible.

In hope that anybody will like it... or will inspire a little bit :-)

Project startup class should be set as 'SingleInstanceApp'.

public class SingleInstanceApp
{
    [STAThread]
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Mutex _mutexSingleInstance = new Mutex(true, "MonitorMeSingleInstance");

        if (_mutexSingleInstance.WaitOne(TimeSpan.Zero, true))
        {
            try
            {
                var app = new App();
                app.InitializeComponent();
                app.Run();

            }
            finally
            {
                _mutexSingleInstance.ReleaseMutex();
                _mutexSingleInstance.Close();
            }
        }
        else
        {
            MessageBox.Show("One instance is already running.");

            var processes = Process.GetProcessesByName(Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().GetName().Name);
            {
                if (processes.Length > 1)
                {
                    foreach (var process in processes)
                    {
                        if (process.Id != Process.GetCurrentProcess().Id)
                        {
                            WindowHelper.SetForegroundWindow(process.MainWindowHandle);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

WindowHelper:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Interop;
using System.Windows.Threading;

namespace HQ.Util.Unmanaged
{
    public class WindowHelper
    {
        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
        public static extern bool SetForegroundWindow(IntPtr hWnd);
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Here's a lightweight solution I use which allows the application to bring an already existing window to the foreground without resorting to custom windows messages or blindly searching process names.

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
static extern bool SetForegroundWindow(IntPtr hWnd);

static readonly string guid = "<Application Guid>";

static void Main()
{
    Mutex mutex = null;
    if (!CreateMutex(out mutex))
        return;

    // Application startup code.

    Environment.SetEnvironmentVariable(guid, null, EnvironmentVariableTarget.User);
}

static bool CreateMutex(out Mutex mutex)
{
    bool createdNew = false;
    mutex = new Mutex(false, guid, out createdNew);

    if (createdNew)
    {
        Process process = Process.GetCurrentProcess();
        string value = process.Id.ToString();

        Environment.SetEnvironmentVariable(guid, value, EnvironmentVariableTarget.User);
    }
    else
    {
        string value = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable(guid, EnvironmentVariableTarget.User);
        Process process = null;
        int processId = -1;

        if (int.TryParse(value, out processId))
            process = Process.GetProcessById(processId);

        if (process == null || !SetForegroundWindow(process.MainWindowHandle))
            MessageBox.Show("Unable to start application. An instance of this application is already running.");
    }

    return createdNew;
}

Edit: You can also store and initialize mutex and createdNew statically, but you'll need to explicitly dispose/release the mutex once you're done with it. Personally, I prefer keeping the mutex local as it will be automatically disposed of even if the application closes without ever reaching the end of Main.

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You can also use the CodeFluent Runtime which is free set of tools. It provides a SingleInstance class to implement a single instance application.

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protected by gdoron Feb 20 '13 at 17:00

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