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I am attempting to provide a reasonable default should the user not provide the name parameter. Doing the following in the Scala Worksheet in the Eclipse IDE is generating a compiler error:

case class Type(id: Int, name: String, description: String = "")
case class Definition(id: Int, types: List[Type], separator: String = ";", name: String = types.mkString(separator))

The error is "not found: value separator" indicated on the identifier "separator" inside the mkString method call for List. Since this is a case class and the previous parameters have been already defined, why am I not able to use "separator" in defining the default value for name. And it turns out I cannot even use "types" in defining the default value for "name", either.

I tried to work around this, but I don't see how without turning name into a var, which isn't something I want to do. Any guidance or understanding on this is appreciated.

UPDATE: Okay, the way I found to get around this was to use the companion object to forward to the constructor:

  case class Type(id: Int, name: String, description: String = "")
  object Definition {
    def create(id: Int, types: List[Type], separator: String = ";", name: String = "") =
      Definition(id, types, separator, if (name != "") name else types.map(_.name).mkString(separator))
  }
  case class Definition(id: Int, types: List[Type], separator: String = ";", name: String) {
    require(!separator.isEmpty, "separator must not be empty")
    require(!name.isEmpty, "name must not be empty")
  }

This sure is quite a bit of Java-like boilerplate compared to what I originally tried to do. Are there other/better ways to do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the constructor for Definition, parameters can't make reference to other parameters:

scala> case class Foo(x: Int, y: Int = x + 1)
<console>:7: error: not found: value x
       case class Foo(x: Int, y: Int = x + 1)
                                       ^

Nor can you curry the constructor arguments, although it can look like it works:

scala> case class Foo(x: Int)(y: Int = x + 1)
defined class Foo

scala> val test = Foo(3)()
test: Foo = Foo(3)

scala> test.y
<console>:11: error: value y is not a member of Foo
              test.y
                   ^

I was able to achieve the effect you wanted by defining extra apply methods in the companion object for Definition:

case class Type(id: Int, name: String, description: String = "")
case class Definition(id: Int, types: List[Type], separator: String, name: String)
object Definition {
  def apply(id: Int, types: List[Type], separator: String): Definition = Definition(id, types, separator, types.mkString(separator))  
  def apply(id: Int, types: List[Type]): Definition = Definition(id, types, ";")
}

Because these are normal methods, not constructors, they can reference and manipulate their arguments as required in the body of the method. Eg:

// Entering paste mode (ctrl-D to finish)

val type1 = Type(1, "foo")
val type2 = Type(2, "bar", "not baz")
val myDef = Definition(1, List(type1, type2))

// Exiting paste mode, now interpreting.

type1: Type = Type(1,foo,)
type2: Type = Type(2,bar,not baz)
myDef: Definition = Definition(1,List(Type(1,foo,), Type(2,bar,not baz)),;,Type(1,foo,);Type(2,bar,not baz))
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LOL! That's what I just figured out. So, why did you call the methods "apply"? –  chaotic3quilibrium Oct 2 '13 at 22:28
1  
That name is treated specially by the compiler - you can call any apply method without writing the actual word apply. This is why val type1 = Type(1, "foo") works, for example - it is actually calling the apply method defined in the Type companion object, which is constructed for you automatically by the compiler because Type is a case class. This is also why the code above doesn't need the word new anywhere. –  Shadowlands Oct 2 '13 at 22:36

You can work around this simply by putting name in a new argument list. Parameters in subsequent argument lists can refer to values of parameters in previous lists, and also infer types from them.

case class Definition(id: Int, types: List[Type], separator: String = ";")(name_ : String = types.mkString(separator)) {
  def name = name_
}
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Sorry, but you can't curry constructors like that. It will compile (at least, in the REPL), but the second parameter set just acts like a separately executed statement block, not as extra parameters passed to the object under construction. –  Shadowlands Oct 2 '13 at 21:56
    
That doesn't appear to do the same thing as what I am trying to do. I need a third member field, "name", to contain either whatever the client passed or compose the default from two previous constructor fields. –  chaotic3quilibrium Oct 2 '13 at 22:20
1  
@Shadowlands The name parameter is available in the scope of the constructed object. However a case class only gets automatic public fields for the first argument list. Maybe that's what made you think it doesn't work. –  Ben James Oct 3 '13 at 9:53
    
Ah, that would make sense. Thanks @BenJames. –  Shadowlands Oct 3 '13 at 14:47

What you probably want is something like this:

case class Type(id: Int, name: String, description: String = "")
case class Definition(id: Int, types: List[Type], separator:String, name: String)
object Definition{
  def apply(id: Int, types: List[Type], separator: String = ";") : Definition = 
    Definition(id,types,separator,types.mkString(separator))
}

This is similar to Shadowlands' solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, you have an error or two in your apply method - the lack of an equals sign between the braces and curly brackets tells the compiler the method has a return type of Unit, not Definition. Try it in the REPL, you may find you hit a couple of other small snags before you get a correctly working solution (I did!). –  Shadowlands Oct 2 '13 at 22:31
    
Right you are! Thanks for the heads up. –  Larsenal Oct 2 '13 at 22:35

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