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I am using Python v3.3.2

I have researched this and still seem to have no luck, so I thought I would post.

I have a class file that creates an empty list and gathers values from another file and puts said values into a list. It does this twice so it creates two sets of numbers. For example:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
[5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

A new list of numbers is thrown into the equation. For example:

[1, 5, 7, 3]

I helping determining if the new set of numbers is a subset of either of the two sets. For example:

[1, 5, 7, 3] is subset of [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
[1, 5, 7, 3] is not a subset of [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

I also need help determining the intersection of the two sets. For example:

[5, 6, 7] is the intersection of [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] and [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

The last thing I need help on is combining the two sets and removing duplicates. For example:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] + [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

Can anyone help me with any of these things?

share|improve this question

All the operations you mention are provided by the set built-in data structure, or can be implemented in terms of its operations, you just need to take a look at the linked documentation. For example:

s1 = set([1, 5, 7, 3])
s2 = set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7])

# is s1 a subset of s2?
s1.issubset(s2)
=> True

# set intersection
set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]) & set([5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10])
=> set([5, 6, 7])

# set union
set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]) | set([5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10])
=> set([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10])
share|improve this answer
    
Has any of this been changed in Python 3? The document you linked says 2.7.5, but I am using 3.3.2. – Eric Oct 2 '13 at 22:14
    
You might want to open the combo box in the left upper corner of that page. – Matthias Oct 2 '13 at 22:16
    
@user2763179 no, the essential operations have not changed. I updated the link to point to Python 3's documentation. – Óscar López Oct 2 '13 at 22:16
    
I think I am getting confused because I have to have a list for each object in my class class that contains elements of the class. So how do I differentiate between the two different sets because I only have one list. – Eric Oct 2 '13 at 22:52
    
@user2763179 the question is not clear: all of the operations in the question require two lists, but you say that you only have one list. Don't get confused, wherever you're currently using a list, just change it to a set, that's all – Óscar López Oct 2 '13 at 22:55

Use the set data structure in Python. You can freely convert lists to sets with set() and sets to lists with list(). sets in Python pretty much follow the definition of mathematical sets. This just means that all items in a set are distinct by definition. Converting a list to a set implicitly removes all duplicates.

Subset:

>>> a = [1, 5, 7, 3]
>>> b = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
>>> set(a).issubset(b)
True
>>> b = [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> set(a).issubset(b)
False

Intersection:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
>>> b = [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> list(set(a).intersection(b))
[5, 6, 7]

Combining the two sets and removing duplicates:

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
>>> b = [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>>> list(set().union(a, b))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
share|improve this answer
    
I think I am getting confused because I have to have a list for each object in my class class that contains elements of the class. So how do I differentiate between the two different sets because I only have one list. – Eric Oct 2 '13 at 22:54
    
@user2763179 What do you mean differentiate between the two different sets? Which two sets are you talking about? – Shashank Oct 2 '13 at 23:14
    
Like in one of my files it does a while loop that sets the variable 'first' equal to 0-9, then does another while loop that sets the variable 'second' equal to 5-14. Then it creates another variable called 'third' that is an empty list and appends 4 numbers and then calls a method from my class to determine if 'third' is a subset of 'first' or 'second'. In my class file I have a constructor method (init) that does not take any arguments but initializes an empty list (myList = []). – Eric Oct 2 '13 at 23:25
1  
I'll just add that when using set.issubset() it doesn't require the other iterable to be a set - so you can use set(a).issubset(b) and the combining the two sets and removing duplicates can be done as set().union(a, b) to avoid the + for the lists – Jon Clements Oct 3 '13 at 1:52
1  
@shashsnk okie dokies - just mentioning the union as it doesn't need to create a temporary list – Jon Clements Oct 3 '13 at 2:14

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