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So I have situations where I need to break out of the current function and go back to the beginning of the function, some of these include error checking (I have not learned try, throw, or catch yet) and as of recently I've been using recursion neglecting the fact that recursion does not function like a goto and simply returns to the beginning of the function but rather creates a separate copy of itself, thus if I use recursion to catch something like client input errors, if the client makes enough errors, it could lead to a potential memory leak.

I was wondering if there was a specific function that could let me 'restart' a function.

As an example using pseudo-pseudo-code:

int foo(){
     //prompt for and receive input
     if(!matchCondition)
          //stop foo() and restart foo()
     //does something
}

The only other thing I can think of is putting the function call in a loop, but that isn't optimal if for example the function is in main() I can't exactly put the call to main in a loop within main, without creating at least one duplicate. Another example where that won't work is if the function needs to return something that doesn't have a limit and thus the "error code" can be produced naturally without the error occuring.

bool ifError=1;
while(ifError){
     ifError = foo();
}
int foo(){
     //prompt for and receive input
     if(!matchCondition)
          return 1;
     //do something
     return 0;
}

The only thing I can think of is a goto statement pointing to the line that foo() was called. if it exists, but I know that is the worst thing I can ever do.

share|improve this question
    
If you jump back to the beginning of the function, how will you get out of the bad state? You're begging to be put into an endless loop. –  Beta Oct 2 '13 at 22:27
    
@Beta well within the function usually there will be a prompt for the client to input something, jumping back would allow them another chance to input something correctly. Sorry I should have specified that. –  SemicolonExpected Oct 2 '13 at 22:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

goto is not "the worst thing you can ever do"; in fact, there are situations where a judicious goto is more readable than any alternative.

However, this is not one of these times. I suggest you do something like this:

TYPE input_thing_from_user()
{
    TYPE rv;
    do
        rv = read_input_from_user();
    while (is_invalid(rv));
    return rv;
}

Use a separate loop for each thing to input; don't make the user retype everything if they mess up near the end of the list.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not too sure what TYPE is. Usually this stuff will also loop each input regardless, thus if they mess up they won't have to redo it all since the other data they have is already stored. Just for those times that they do mess up they can reinput that thing. –  SemicolonExpected Oct 2 '13 at 22:32
    
TYPE is a placeholder for whatever type the input you're reading from the user needs to have. If there are input validity checks that depend on more than one piece of input, put another loop around that group of inputs. –  Zack Oct 2 '13 at 22:35
    
Ah ok I see. So basically just nest while loops. –  SemicolonExpected Oct 2 '13 at 22:37
1  
Yep! Any time you might need to go back and redo some stuff, think loops first. (Sometimes loops are not the answer, but it's more likely than not that they are.) Also, if you find yourself nesting loops more than two deep, it may be time to think about breaking up the function into smaller pieces. –  Zack Oct 2 '13 at 22:40
    
for extra credit (if you already studied templates) TYPE could be a template type, and the read_inpu_from_user, if it took rv as a pass by ref or pointer, could be an overloaded function for each TYPE –  nhed Oct 2 '13 at 22:41

You could do:

int foo()
{
    while (true)
    {
        ...
        if (/* this should start over */)
            continue;
        ...
        if (/* this should end */)
            return /* some value */;
        ...
    }
}
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