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Say i have a several list if ints:

x =  [['48', '5', '0'], ['77', '56', '0'],
['23', '76', '34', '0']]

I want this list to be converted to a single number, but the the single number type is still an integer i.e.:

4850775602376340

i have been using this code to carry out the process:

num = int(''.join(map(str,x)))

but i keep getting a value error.

Also if my list contained negative integers how would i convert them to there absolute value? Then convert them to a single number?

x2 = [['48', '-5', '0'], ['77', '56', '0'], ['23', '76', '-34', '0']]

x2 = 4850775602376340

Thanks in advance.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Its a list of lists, so

num = int(''.join(''.join(l) for l in lists))

or

def flatten( nested ):
    for inner in nested:
        for x in inner:
            yield x

num = ''.join(flatten(lists))
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>>> int(''.join(reduce(lambda a, b: a + b, x)))
4850775602376340
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Thanks a bunch! –  harpalss Dec 16 '09 at 14:28
    
just another quick question how woould i raise and error if the single number didnt contain and integer? –  harpalss Dec 16 '09 at 14:44
    
@harpalss: you can loop through the items and check type(i)==int if you want to make sure –  mizipzor Dec 16 '09 at 14:46
1  
The int()-call will raise a ValueError in that case. –  Alex Brasetvik Dec 16 '09 at 15:03

I'd use itertools.chain.from_iterable for this (new in python 2.6)

Example code:

import itertools
x = [['48', '5', '0'], ['77', '56', '0'], ['23', '76', '34', '0']]
print int(''.join(itertools.chain.from_iterable(x)))
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>>> int(''.join(j for i in x for j in i))
4850775602376340
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>>> x = [['48', '5', '0'], ['77', '56', '0'], ['23', '76', '34', '0']]
>>> int(''.join([''.join(i) for i in x ] ))
4850775602376340
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And to turn it into an actual int, wrap the int() call around it. –  Amber Dec 16 '09 at 14:16

Enough good answers already ... just wanted to add the treatment of unlimited nesting:

def flatten(obj):
    if not isinstance(obj, list):
        return obj
    else:
        return ''.join([flatten(x) for x in obj])

>>> x = [['48', '5', '0'], ['77', '56', '0'], ['23', '76', '34', '0']]
>>> flatten(x)
'4850775602376340'

>>> x = [['48', '5', '0'], ['77', '56', '0'], [['23','123'], '76', '34', '0']]
>>> flatten(x)
'4850775602312376340'
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recursion is always nice ;) –  João Portela Dec 16 '09 at 15:57

simply put:

  1. flattening the list

    [e for e in (itertools.chain(*x))]
    
  2. removing the negative sign

    e.replace('-','')
    
  3. joining the numbers in a list into a string and turning it into a number

    int(''.join(x))
    

putting it all together

x2 = int(''.join([e.replace('-','') for e in (itertools.chain(*x))]))
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