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I don't understand why I am getting a seg fault with this small amount of code. I don't know whether it is strcmp or fgets this is causing the problem. I've been working on and off for two days with this, pardon my frustration.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

FILE* input;
char line[40];


    printf("%s\n", argv[1]);
    if ((strcmp(argv[1], "-f")) == 1)
    {           
        printf("Inside first if statement\n");          
        input = fopen(argv[2], "r");
        if(input == NULL)           
        {
            printf("Could not open file\n");
            exit(-1);
        }
    }
    while ((fgets(line, 40, input)) != NULL)
        {
        //printf("%s\n", input_line);
        }

return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Are you aware strcmp returns 0 on sucess? – Troy Oct 3 '13 at 0:18
if ((strcmp(argv[1], "-f")) == 1)

should be:

if (strcmp(argv[1], "-f") == 0)

...you might want to read the documentation first. See strcmp, fgets.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 check argc for decent values too... – Charlie Burns Oct 3 '13 at 0:25
    
And the same documentation you linked says that fgets returns NULL when failed to read any characters. – zubergu Oct 3 '13 at 0:57
    
@zubergu: Indeed. I mistaken it with fgetc and even misread the documentation afterwards. Apologies. – LihO Oct 3 '13 at 1:05

You might want to do the following:

  • check the number of arguments
  • allocate room in line[] for the NULL-terminator
  • strcmp returns =0 on success, >0 location of mismatch
  • perl has 'chomp', you might replicate it to remove extra "\n"

Here is your code, revised and working,

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int usage()
{
    printf("usage: %s -f <file>\n",argv[0]);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    FILE* input;
    char line[+1]; //allow room for NULL terminator

    if (argc < 3 || strcmp(argv[1], "-f") ) { usage(); exit(1); }
    printf("file: %s\n", argv[2]);
    if( (input = fopen(argv[2], "r")) == NULL)
    {
        printf("open %s\n",argv[2]);
        exit(2);
    }
    //ask C how big line[] is
    while ( fgets(line, sizeof(line), input) != NULL )
    {
        //line[sizeof(line)-1] = '\0'; //fgets does this for us
        printf("%s\n", line);
    }
    return 0;
}

BTW: *The use of EXIT_SUCCESS and EXIT_FAILURE is slightly more portable (to non-UNIX environments) than the use of 0 and some nonzero value like 1 or -1.*

share|improve this answer
    
Nitpicky, but 0 and EXIT_SUCCESS are equally portable (see C11 7.22.4.4.5), but you're right about EXIT_FAILURE. – Paul Griffiths Oct 3 '13 at 2:30
    
There's still a problem if the user does not put -f as their first command-line argument when running the program. The program will fall through to the while loop which will likely crash the program since input has not been assigned yet. Also, strcmp() does not return the position of the mismatch. It returns -1 if the first arg is alphabetically before the second arg, +1 otherwise. – willus Oct 3 '13 at 2:33
    
Yes, on the "-f", I was trying to concisely answer his question. I would do the command line arg parsing much differently. – ChuckCottrill Oct 3 '13 at 4:12
    
And yes, strcmp is more like the 'spaceship' operator. – ChuckCottrill Oct 3 '13 at 4:14
    
@ChuckCottrill -- The second if statement is now redundant in your latest edit. You have assured that the first argument is -f with the previous if statement. – willus Oct 5 '13 at 11:02

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