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I want to write some driver to use a class below: but I can not understand the declaration of this class and how to use it. I want to understand this class and used it, so what's i want to learn to understand this class deeply. Thanks in advanced!:

typedef void (*pvoidf_t)(void);

/* A class for storing and calling a pointer to a static or member void function */

class FunctionPointer {

public:

    FunctionPointer(void (*function)(void) = 0);

    /** Create a FunctionPointer, attaching a member function
     *
     *  @param object The object pointer to invoke the member function on (i.e. the this pointer)
     *  @param function The address of the void member function to attach
     */
    template<typename T>
    FunctionPointer(T *object, void (T::*member)(void)) {
        attach(object, member);
    }

    /** Attach a static function
     *
     *  @param function The void static function to attach (default is none)
     */
    void attach(void (*function)(void) = 0);

    /** Attach a member function
     *
     *  @param object The object pointer to invoke the member function on (i.e. the this pointer)
     *  @param function The address of the void member function to attach
     */
    template<typename T>
    void attach(T *object, void (T::*member)(void)) {
        _object = static_cast<void*>(object);
        memcpy(_member, (char*)&member, sizeof(member));
        _membercaller = &FunctionPointer::membercaller<T>;
        _function = 0;
    }

    /** Call the attached static or member function
     */
    void call();

    pvoidf_t get_function() const {
        return (pvoidf_t)_function;
    }

private:

    template<typename T>
    static void membercaller(void *object, char *member) {
        T* o = static_cast<T*>(object);
        void (T::*m)(void);
        memcpy((char*)&m, member, sizeof(m));
        (o->*m)();
    }

    void (*_function)(void);                // static function pointer - 0 if none attached
    void *_object;                            // object this pointer - 0 if none attached
    char _member[16];                        /* raw member function pointer storage - converted back by registered _membercaller */
    void (*_membercaller)(void*, char*);    /* registered membercaller function to convert back and call _member on _object */

};
share|improve this question
    
What exactly do you not understand? Admittedly, the syntax of function pointers and especially member function pointers is... confusing at best. You can find some information in this C++ FAQ. – dyp Oct 3 '13 at 3:18
    
template<typename T> FunctionPointer(T *object, void (T::*member)(void)) { attach(object, member); template: I understand typename T: I understand T *object: I understand T::*member: I don't understand this, I have never seen this declaration before. I try searching google and ask someone but in consequence, it's failed, nobody know it Can you explain and give one example to use this classs – nghiatsdv Oct 3 '13 at 10:30

First, I'll address the comment:

template<typename T>
FunctionPointer(T *object, void (T::*member)(void)) {
    attach(object, member);
}

This part of the class declares a constructor template, similarly to a member function template. It's parameters are:

  • a pointer to an object of type T, named object
  • and a pointer to a member function of T with no parameters and no return value, named member

The syntax of the latter can be read as:

void   (T  ::  *  member)  (void)
^       ^      ^  ^        ^ argument list
|       |      |  | name of the parameter
|       |      | it's a pointer
|       | class type
| return type

Now, the rest of the functions:

FunctionPointer(void (*function)(void) = 0);

This is a (non-template) constructor with a parameter pointer to a function with no parameters and no return value, named function. The parameter has a default argument 0.

The signature of the overloads of the member function attach can be understood similarly to the constructors.

get_function now finally uses a typedef: typedef void (*pvoidf_t)(void);, which defines an alias for the type pointer to a function with no parameters and no return value. This could have been done as well for the non-template functions (and constructors) of that class:

FunctionPointer(pvoidf_t function = 0);

This is an equivalent substitute for the declaration of the non-template constructor shown above.


The whole class is meant to store either a function pointer or a member function pointer. A pointer to a static member function is not different from a pointer to a free function, but a pointer to a non-static member function is: at the very least, it needs an instance of the class to act upon:

struct my_class
{
    int m;
    void set_m() { m = 42; }
};

typedef void (my_class::*mem_fun_ptr)();
mem_fun_ptr p_set_m = &my_class::set_m;

my_class instance;
(instance.*p_set_m)(); // we need an instance to call the member function

Therefore, when storing a member function pointer, the class FunctionPointer also needs to store a pointer to an instance.

A second problem arises because the type of the member function pointer is dependent on the class of the member function. The type of void (class_A::*)() is different from void (class_B::*)().

From the function membercaller and the private variables, we can guess how these problems are solved in FunctionPointer:

  • for any ordinary (free) function pointer, the data member _function is used
  • for any member function pointer:
    1. data member _object is set to point to the passed instance
    2. the member function pointer is copied into a buffer (hopefully large enough), data member _member
    3. Data member _membercaller is set to point to an instance of the membercaller static function template. This is a crucial step: Inside the ctor/attach, we still know the class type of the member function pointer, but we lose this once we return. Therefore, the type is "encoded" in the instance of the membercaller template we point to. This function "knows" the class type because of its template parameter. For every different class type, a new membercaller instance is created, e.g. membercaller<class_A>, membercaller<class_B> etc. Those are different functions, with possibly different addresses and possibly different behaviour.
    4. data member _function is set to 0

Further guessing: For any call, the member function call is used. If _function is not 0, it directly calls _function(). If _function is 0, it calls _membercaller(_object, _member), which resolves to a call to an instance of membercaller with the "correct" class type for the member function call.


Two examples how to use this class:

void my_function() {
    // do something
}

FunctionPointer myptr(&my_function);
// store myptr, do something else
myptr.call();  // calls (indirectly) `my_function`

With a member function pointer:

struct my_class {
    int m;
    void my_function() { /*...*/ }
};

my_instance inst = {42};

FunctionPointer myptr(&inst, &my_class::my_function);
// store myptr, do something else

// make sure `inst` lives until after the call!
myptr.call();  // calls (indirectly) `inst.my_function()`
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Sashkello so much your explanation is so clear, I understand it and implement it successfully in my project I extremely appreciate you and stackoverflow – nghiatsdv Oct 4 '13 at 6:23

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