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I am trying to open (and simultaneously create) a file in C, using a character array as the path name I pass in which is stored within a node structure. When I do this, it is appending a question mark to the file name.

The array specifying the file name is defined as follows:

#define MAX_LENGTH 1024
typedef struct node {
    ...
    char input[MAX_LENGTH]; // filename
    ...
}

When I initially put the program name in the node structure, I use makeargv and strcpy as follows:

char **strings;
makeargv(s,":",&strings);
strcpy(n->input,strings[2]);

When I open the file, I try to redirect stdin to it as follows:

char **argumentList;
makeargv(nodes[i]->prog," ",&argumentList);
if (strcmp(nodes[i]->input, "stdin") != 0) {
    char* input = nodes[i]->input;
    int in = open(input, O_RDONLY);
    dup2(in, 0);
    int cl = close(in);
    ...
}               

I am having trouble understanding if it is something to do with the way I am passing the pathname in, the attempt to redirect to stdin, or something else, and I'm having trouble figuring out exactly what the problem is..could anyone point me in the right direction as to why this may be happening?

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Almost certainly a non-graphic character was placed in the file name. Check by using ls -b to show the file names with octal escapes for non-graphic characters. This likely means it has something to do with the input provided to makeargv() or a problem with how makeargv() is implemented. –  jxh Oct 3 '13 at 2:49
1  
Have you tried breaking the problem down? If you're not sure whether it's the pathname, or the redirection to stdin, then remove the redirection code, and try it. If that works, hardcode the filename, and try the redirection. But I agree, my bet is on makeargv(), the implementation of which you don't show. –  Paul Griffiths Oct 3 '13 at 2:58
    
Are you sure the file name string is correctly nul-terminated? –  hyde Oct 3 '13 at 3:51
    
Aha! Yes, it had a newline character at the end. Removing this fixed the problem. –  Christine Oct 3 '13 at 3:54
    
It may also have something to do with opening "stdin" instead of "/dev/stdin" but its hard to say, you may have a symlink in the working directory or "stdin" is really a named pipe from which you read the argv –  technosaurus Oct 3 '13 at 4:54
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1 Answer

You didn't include the code for which the user enters input. Make sure it is passing the input correctly - check for any non-graphicals characters at the end of the string, and make sure the string is ended with the null character.

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