Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given these two snippets:

$.ready(function()
{
     ……
}

and

(function($){
  $(function(){

    ……

  });
})(jQuery);

It seems I use the first format but it does not work, so I would like to know what is the difference between them?

Also, is there a difference between putting the <script src="" /> at the bottom of the page and the head?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Arun P Johny, plalx, Jack, Stewie, Pragnesh Chauhan Oct 3 '13 at 9:54

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Arun P Johny, plalx, Jack, Stewie, Pragnesh Chauhan
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I personally find it easier to use jQuery(function($) { ... }); instead. –  Jack Oct 3 '13 at 3:48
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The difference, among others things, is that those two are different functions:

  • jQuery.ready is an internal method to trigger the ready event. It does not expect a function as argument, but a boolean.

  • $(function) is a a shortcut for jQuery.fn.ready, which is an API method to bind ready event handlers, i.e. functions that should be run when the DOM is loaded.

So, the first one "doesn't work" because it simply does not do what you think it does. I recommend to read the .ready documentation.

The fact that the second is wrapped in an immediately invoked function expression has no impact on the functionality.

Also, is there a difference between putting the <script src="" /> at the bottom of the page and the head?

Assuming you are talking about binding handlers to the ready event, then no, there is no difference regarding execution.


For those who don't want to follow links:

jQuery.ready:

// Handle when the DOM is ready
ready: function( wait ) {

    // Abort if there are pending holds or we're already ready
    if ( wait === true ? --jQuery.readyWait : jQuery.isReady ) {
        return;
    }

    // Remember that the DOM is ready
    jQuery.isReady = true;

    // If a normal DOM Ready event fired, decrement, and wait if need be
    if ( wait !== true && --jQuery.readyWait > 0 ) {
        return;
    }

    // If there are functions bound, to execute
    readyList.resolveWith( document, [ jQuery ] );

    // Trigger any bound ready events
    if ( jQuery.fn.trigger ) {
        jQuery( document ).trigger("ready").off("ready");
    }
},

jQuery.fn.ready:

ready: function( fn ) {  
    // Add the callback
    jQuery.ready.promise().done( fn );

    return this;
},
share|improve this answer
    
Putting scripts in the head does have an effect on loading behaviour (time) as opposed to having them at the end of <body>. –  Jack Oct 3 '13 at 3:50
add comment

The difference between the two is that the first assumes jQuery is set to the variable $. The second does not.

The second defines $ in a sandbox, as a parameter to a function, and then passes jQuery in for that parameter. It's a common way of using the shorthand $ even while in noConflict mode.

(function($){  // <----- $ is defined ONLY within THIS function
  $(function(){
    ……
  });
})(jQuery);    // <------- jQuery being passed in for $
share|improve this answer
add comment

To answer your last question:

Putting javascript at the bottom of a page ensures that the page's HTML is loaded before execution. Including a javascript file at the bottom of the page puts its order of loading last behind all other files, as far as I am aware.

The snippets you have provided should be identical in execution, though using the first is more appropriate. The second feels... Redundant.

share|improve this answer
    
The snippets are not identical. The first one calls jQuery.ready, the second calls jQuery.fn.ready. –  Felix Kling Oct 3 '13 at 3:41
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.