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I am learning Java, and met some question about the Overloading. Take the following function use as example:

f('a', 'a');

If we have two definition as:

static void f(int i, char j){
    System.out.println("int_char");
}

static void f(double i, char j){
    System.out.println("double_char");
}

It will be OK. Because all the second parameters are exactly matching. But the first parameters, they both use widen. And the widen order for char is:

char -> int -> long -> float -> double

For char to achieve int, it needs one step. But to achieve double, it will need 4 steps. So the result is:

int_char

But the I change the order of the paremeter as:

static void f(int i, char j){
    System.out.println("int_char");
}

static void f(char i, double j){
    System.out.println("char_double");
}

The compiler would propose an error as ambiguous. Why?

Another case is as following:

static void f(char i, Character j){
    System.out.println("char_Character");
}

static void f(Character i, Character j){
    System.out.println("Character_Character");
}

Both of the second parameters use atuoboxing. But the first parameter of void f(char i, Character j) is exactly matching. Why these two function together will lead to ambiguous?

Finally, if anyone of these functions appears with the follwing one:

static void f(Character... i){
    System.out.println("Character_varargs");
}

The output is not Character_varargs, because widen > boxing > varargs. But when two ambiguous functions are with the Character_varargs one like:

static void f(char i, Character j){
    System.out.println("char_Character");
}

static void f(Character i, Character j){
    System.out.println("Character_Character");
}

static void f(Character... i){
    System.out.println("Character_varargs");
}

The result would be Character_varargs. Why?

Even we add some non-ambiguous and higher-priority-in-overloading function like:

static void f(int i, char j){
    System.out.println("int_char");
}

static void f(char i, double j){
    System.out.println("char_double");
}

static void f(int i, double j){
    System.out.println("int_double");
}

static void f(Character... i){
    System.out.println("Character_varargs");
}

The result is still Character_varargs. Why? If only consider void f(int i, double j) and void f(Character... i), the output should be int_double.

When the compiler meet with ambiguous functions, does it directly "jump" to the varargs function (if there is) without considering any other candidate?

Thanks!

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1  
This is all explained in great detail in the JLS. Did you thoroughly research this there? –  Jim Garrison Oct 3 '13 at 4:30
    
@JimGarrison I am sorry. I just have learned Java for exactly two days. I really do not know that materials before. I am trying to find out the answer there. Thanks for your suggestions. –  Sheng Oct 3 '13 at 5:00

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