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I'm looking at someone else's MPI code and there are a number of times that variables are declared in main() and used in other functions (some MPI specific). I am new to MPI, but in my programming experience that is normally not supposed to be done. Basically it is difficult for me to determine if it is safe to do this (no errors are thrown).

The entire code is quite long so I will just give a simplified version below:

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    // ...unrelated code
    int num_procs, local_rank, name_len;
    MPI_Comm comm_new;

    MPI_Init(&argc, &argv);
    MPI_Get_processor_name(proc_name, &name_len);

    create_ring_topology(&comm_new, &local_rank, &num_procs);
    // ...unrelated code

    MPI_Comm_free(&comm_new);
    MPI_Finalize();
}

void create_ring_topology(MPI_Comm* comm_new, int* local_rank, int* num_procs) {    
    MPI_Comm_size(MPI_COMM_WORLD, num_procs);

    int dims[1], periods[1];
    int dimension = 1;
    dims[0] = *num_procs;
    periods[0] = 1;
    int* local_coords = malloc(sizeof(int)*dimension);

    MPI_Cart_create(MPI_COMM_WORLD, dimension, dims, periods, 0, comm_new);
    MPI_Comm_rank(*comm_new, local_rank);
    MPI_Comm_size(*comm_new, num_procs);
    MPI_Cart_coords(*comm_new, *local_rank, dimension, local_coords);
    sprintf(s_local_coords, "[%d]", local_coords[0]);
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's just regular pointer usage. Nothing wrong with that.

The variables are declared in main and remain in-scope until main returns, i.e. almost for the duration of the program.

Note that MPI does not actually add anything to C. All it is is an extra library. It does not extend the language.

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Ah, that bit of information was what I was missing. So something referenced that was declared in main in always safe? I don't really know the rules on how the address space is shared among different processes –  asimes Oct 3 '13 at 5:52
    
Almost always. If you use atexit() you could have code run after main returns, so any variable declared in main would be out of scope and hence unsafe. –  Adam Oct 3 '13 at 5:53
    
Ok, yeah I'm not going to be doing anything like that, thanks –  asimes Oct 3 '13 at 5:54
    
But in this case create_ring_topology is just using the pointers that were passed to it, so the caller, i.e. main has to ensure they're safe. They are. –  Adam Oct 3 '13 at 5:54
    
@asimes: MPI processes do not share any address space. Each process has its own memory space, with its own copy of each variable declared. –  suszterpatt Oct 3 '13 at 17:27

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