Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Edit: Two options shown below.

If you're just using the functionality that an IDisposable provides, the aptly named using clause works fine. If you're wrapping an IDisposable in an object, the containing object itself needs to be IDisposable and you need to implement the appropriate pattern (either a sealed IDisposable class, or the messier but standard virtual pattern).

But sometimes a helper factory method is good for cleanliness. If you return an IDisposable directly after construction, you're fine, but if you first construct it and then modify it or otherwise execute code that can throw an exception before returning, you need to safely call .Dispose() - but only if there was an error.

For example, unsafe code could look like this...

DbCommand CreateCommandUnsafely(string commandText)
{
    var newCommand = connection.CreateCommand();
    newCommand.CommandText = commandText;  //what if this throws?
    return newCommand;
}

Solutions Two safe variants follows...

DbCommand CreateCommandSafelyA(string commandText)
{
    DbCommand newCommand = null;
    bool success = false;
    try    {
        newCommand = connection.CreateCommand();
        newCommand.CommandText = commandText; //if this throws...
        success=true;
        return newCommand;
    } finally{
        if (!success && newCommand != null )
            newCommand.Dispose(); //...we'll clean up here.
    }
}


DbCommand CreateCommandSafelyB(string commandText)
{
    DbCommand newCommand = null;
    try    {
        newCommand = connection.CreateCommand();
        newCommand.CommandText = commandText; //if this throws...
        return newCommand;
    } catch {
        if (newCommand != null)
            newCommand.Dispose(); //...we'll clean up here.
        throw;
    }
}

Safe variant A is just one line longer, but seems to be the idiomatic approach. There don't seem to be any really concise solutions, although some posters below give some lambda-using options that extract the encapsulate this logic.

The code bloat with any of the above safe methods remains, and is particularly aggravating with code that originally looked like...

return new MyDisposableThing {
    OptionA = "X",
    OptionB = B.Blabla,
    Values = src.Values.Where(priority => priority > 1.0),
};

The above code gets written safely is quite a bit longer and less readable because you can no longer safely use the shortened setter syntax.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe this is the standard pattern:

DbCommand CreateCommand(string commandText)
{
    DbCommand newCommand = null;
    bool success = false;
    try
    {
        newCommand = connection.CreateCommand();
        newCommand.CommandText = commandText;
        success = true;
        return newCommand;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (!success & newCommand != null)
            newCommand.Dispose();
     }
}

It does not catch and rethrow the error.

share|improve this answer
    
This does look like code I see elsewhere. Do you know why this is preferable? –  Eamon Nerbonne Dec 23 '09 at 14:03
    
Catching arbitrary exceptions (as the other answers seem to advocate) causes a varity of problems in special circumstances, and should be avoided whenever possible. By placing the disposal inside a finally statement, the standard pattern avoids catching exceptions, and (when the object creation fails) it mimics the behavior of the nominal using statement. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 23 '09 at 22:23
add comment

No - I think there isn't a better way.

However, you could write a helper class:

public static class DisposeHelper
{
  public static TDisposable DisposeOnError<TDisposable>(TDisposable dispoable, Action<TDisposable> action)
     where TDisposable : IDisposable
  {
    try
    {
       action(dispoable);
    }
    catch(Exception)
    {
       disposable.Dispose();
       throw;
    }

    return disposable;
  }
}

So you could write:

return DisposeHelper.DisposeOnError(connection.CreateCommand(), cmd => cmd.CommandText = commandText);

I am not sure, however, if that is really a better way.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could consider writing an Extension Method:

public static class Disposable
{
    public static void SafelyDo<T>(this T disp, Action<T> action) where T : IDisposable
    {
        try
        {
            action(disp);
        }
        catch
        {
            disp.Dispose();
            throw;
        }
    }
}

This would allow you to write code like this:

var disp = new MyDisposable();
disp.SafelyDo(d =>
    {
        d.Foo = "Ploeh";
        d.Bar = 42;
    });
return disp;
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think you are overcomplicating the issue.

If your method returns a disposable object, then you are saying "I hereby relinquish ownership of this object, for better or worse". If an error occurs while you are building it, then why should that make a difference? The calling code will still dispose of it even if you throw an exception.

For example:

DbCommand CreateCommand(string commandText) {
    var newCommand = connection.CreateCommand();
    newCommand.CommandText = commandText; // what if this throws?
    return newCommand;
}

void UseCommand() {
    using(var cmd = CreateCommand("my query goes here")) {
        // consume the command
    }
}

Edit: Unfortunately, if an exception is thrown inside CreateCommand, the cmd variable is never set and the object will not be disposed correctly.

share|improve this answer
3  
I don't believe that is true. Since the cmd variable will never be assigned, the using block will not call cmd.Dispose(). –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 16 '09 at 15:55
    
The issue is the throw on CommandText will mean the newCommand is never returned to the using statement, so it will not be disposed of there. –  Kleinux Dec 16 '09 at 15:56
    
Good point, guys. In that case I vote for something along the lines of winSharp93's generic method. –  Christian Hayter Dec 16 '09 at 16:10
    
I edited the post to point out the risk of non-disposal. –  Eamon Nerbonne Dec 23 '09 at 14:00
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.