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I want to sort a 2*n matrix, n is given in the input. Make a program to output a matrix. Here is the requirement:

  1. the first column MUST be sorted in ASC, and
  2. the second column in DESC if possible.

For example, let n = 5, and the matrix is

3 4
1 2
3 5
1 6
7 3

The result should be

1 6
1 2
3 5
3 4
7 3

So I write down the code like this. First line input the value n, and the following lines like above.

#include <stdio.h>
#define TWO_16 65536
#define TWO_15 32768

int v[100000][2];
int z[100000];
int vec[100000];
int n;


int main()
{
    int i, j;
    scanf ("%d", &n);   // give the value of n;
    for (i = 1; i <= n; i++)    // filling the matrix;
    {
        scanf ("%d%d", &v[i][0], &v[i][1]);
        z[i] = TWO_16 * v[i][0] + TWO_15 - v[i][1];
        vec[i] = i;
    }
    for (i = 1; i <= n; i++)
        for (j = 1; j <= i; j++)
        {
            if (z[j] > z[i])
            {
                int t = vec[i];
                vec[i] = vec[j];
                vec[j] = t;
            }
        }

    for (i = 1; i <= n; i++)   // output the matrix
        printf("%d %d\n",v[vec[i]][0],v[vec[i]][1]);
    return 0;
}

But in gcc, the output is

1 6
3 5
3 4
1 2
7 3

What's more, when the first line is changed to "1 2" and the second is changed to "3 4" in input, the result also changed.

What's the problem of my code?

Additional information:

I use z[] because I use a function that satisfy the requirement of this problem, so I can simply sort them. And vec[] stores the original index, because moving arrays may cost lots of time. So v[vec[i]][0] means the 'new' array's item i. Note that v[0] is NOT used. n is less than 100000, not equal.

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2  
"But in gcc, the output is" Like if it was even possible to be a mistake of gcc... Shouldn't be tagged with gcc, but with C. –  Adam Stelmaszczyk Oct 3 '13 at 9:06
1  
Don't see why this got downvoted, at least not in its current edited state. –  Duncan Bayne Oct 3 '13 at 9:15
1  
The whole z[] thing doesn't belong to the buble sort algorithm. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_sort –  vines Oct 3 '13 at 9:15
    
Anyway, it is wrong. You must compare the same array that you want to sort. If you use two different array, you are sorting array 2, with information in array 1, but array 1 is not updated during the sorting. –  Federico Oct 3 '13 at 9:57
    
In z he is just transforming two numbers into one (profit function?) and sorting based on that. What's wrong with that. z seems to be properly constructed to maintain order he wants to sort in. –  zoska Oct 3 '13 at 10:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are comparing values stored in z[], but swapping elements of vec. So when in the begginig you have:

i  vec      z
------------------
1   1     z[1]
2   2     z[2]
3   3     z[3]
...   

After for e.g. swapping 2 with 3

i  vec      z
------------------
1   1     z[1]
2   3     z[2]
3   2     z[3]
...

you will have improper mapping between vec and z.

So in another iteration you will again compare z[2] with z[3] and again you will have to swap elements of vec. That's why you should at least also swap elements of z or index elements of z using elements of vec

i  vec      z
------------------
1   1    z[vec[1]] = z[1]
2   3    z[vec[2]] = z[3]
3   2    z[vec[3]] = z[2]
...

Adding this should do the trick

...
int t = vec[i];
vec[i] = vec[j];
vec[j] = t;
//Add this also when swapping vec
t = z[i];
z[i] = z[j];
z[j] = t;
...
share|improve this answer

Array index start with 0, so your for cicles must start from 0

if (z[j] > z[i]): you want to sort v but you are comparing z and sorting vec. By sorting vec and comparing z bubble sort cannot work. You must use the same array.

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