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Here I am again. Today I wrote a little script that is supposed to start an application silently in my debian env. Easy as

silent "npm search 1234556"

This works but not at all. As you can see, I commented the section where I have some troubles.

This line:

$($cmdLine) &

doesn't hide application output but this one

$($1 >/dev/null 2>/dev/null) &

works perfectly. What am I missing? Many thanks.

#!/bin/sh

# Daniele Brugnara
# October, 2013

# Silently exec a command line passed as argument

errorsRedirect=""

if [ -z "$1" ]; then
        echo "Please, don't joke me..."
        exit 1
fi

cmdLine="$1 >/dev/null"

# if passed a second parameter, errors will be hidden
if [ -n "$2" ]; then
        cmdLine="$cmdLine 2>/dev/null"
fi

# not working
$($cmdLine) &

# works perfectly
#$($1 >/dev/null 2>/dev/null) &
share|improve this question
    
Why do you think & does any redirection of stdout or stderr? –  Jens Oct 3 '13 at 9:15
    
I don't think that. cmdLine has output redirection. Am I doing this wrong? –  Daniele Brugnara Oct 3 '13 at 9:17
    
& at the end of a command only runs that command in background but still that command's stdout and stderr goes to tty. –  anubhava Oct 3 '13 at 9:17
    
please, read all script where I'm preparing $cmdLine with output redirection. :) –  Daniele Brugnara Oct 3 '13 at 9:19
    
@Fckd-up-duck Ah, ok. I understand now your expectation. Yes, you are doing this wrong. This is a matter of sequence of expansions: redirections are performed before variable substitution. Vis: foo="echo > x"; $foo will print > x, not redirect to x. –  Jens Oct 3 '13 at 10:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With the use of evil eval following script will work:

#!/bin/sh

# Silently exec a command line passed as argument
errorsRedirect=""

if [ -z "$1" ]; then
   echo "Please, don't joke me..."
   exit 1
fi

cmdLine="$1 >/dev/null"

# if passed a second parameter, errors will be hidden
if [ -n "$2" ]; then
   cmdLine="$cmdLine 2>&1"
fi

eval "$cmdLine &"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's a working solution. Can I ask you why I'm forced to use eval in this case? Many thanks again. –  Daniele Brugnara Oct 3 '13 at 9:42
1  
It is because >/dev/null 2>&1 is not actually part of your command but special shell constructs for redirections of stdout and stderr. –  anubhava Oct 3 '13 at 9:48
1  
You can replace eval with bash -c "$cmdLine &" also –  anubhava Oct 3 '13 at 9:51
    
And that's better than eval? –  Daniele Brugnara Oct 3 '13 at 9:53
    
I guess both will be same, just wanted to give an alternative. eval is not always evil there are some cases when you need it. –  anubhava Oct 3 '13 at 9:55

Rather than building up a command with redirection tacked on the end, you can incrementally apply it:

#!/bin/sh

if [ -z "$1" ]; then
    exit
fi

exec >/dev/null
if [ -n "$2" ]; then
    exec 2>&1
fi

exec $1

This first redirects stdout of the shell script to /dev/null. If the second argument is given, it redirects stderr of the shell script too. Then it runs the command which will inherit stdout and stderr from the script.

I removed the ampersand (&) since being silent has nothing to do with running in the background. You can add it back (and remove the exec on the last line) if it is what you want.

I added exec at the end as it is slightly more efficient. Since it is the end of the shell script, there is nothing left to do, so you may as well be done with it, hence exec.

share|improve this answer
    
Very clear. What I want to do is "shot and forget" so & is mandatory :) Thanks for this solution. –  Daniele Brugnara Oct 3 '13 at 9:58
    
This is the solution. eval was needed as suggested elsewhere. +1. –  devnull Oct 3 '13 at 12:12

& means that you're doing sort of multitask whereas

1 >/dev/null 2>/dev/null

means that you redirect the output to a sort of garbage and that's why you don't see anything.

Furthermore cmdLine="$1 >/dev/null" is incorrect, you should use ' instead of " :

cmdLine='$1 >/dev/null' 
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I want to achieve =). The question is why $(cmdLine) doesn't work but the last command does. –  Daniele Brugnara Oct 3 '13 at 9:16
    
Issuing a command with an ampersand at the end runs the command in the background, but the output is still piped to the current shell process. Redirecting 1 and 2 to /dev/null sends all output (standard and error) to "nowhere", hence the silent operation. You might want to consider piping at least error through tee and into a log if you want to detect failures. –  Raad Oct 3 '13 at 9:19
1  
Yeah, I hit enter prematurely =/ –  Raad Oct 3 '13 at 9:24
    
The question is still the same... What's wrong with my $cmdLine var? :) –  Daniele Brugnara Oct 3 '13 at 9:28
    
I think you should use ' instead of " –  Thomas Oct 3 '13 at 9:28

you can build your command line in a var and run a bash with it in background:

bash -c "$cmdLine"&

Note that it might be useful to store the output (out/err) of the program, instead of trow them in null. In addition, why do you need errorsRedirect?? You can even add a wait at the end, just to be safe...if you want...

#!/bin/sh

# Daniele Brugnara
# October, 2013

# Silently exec a command line passed as argument

[ ! $1 ] && echo "Please, don't joke me..." && exit 1
cmdLine="$1>/dev/null"
# if passed a second parameter, errors will be hidden
[ $2 ] && cmdLine+=" 2>/dev/null"
# not working
echo "Running \"$cmdLine\""
bash -c "$cmdLine" &
wait
share|improve this answer
    
Good "zipped" version :) –  Daniele Brugnara Oct 3 '13 at 11:53

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