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Is there a better "workaround" than this? I want to avoid the use of a PREFIX (local var) when accessing the methods on TableMap.

public class TableMap extends TreeMap<String, String> {
    public String field1, field2, field3;
    public TableMap(Tables table){}
    public void method(){}
    public void method2(){}
    public void method3(){}
    ...
}

workaround!

public enum Tables {
    table1, table2, table3;
    public final TableMap MAP=new TableMap(this);
    private Tables(){}
}

needed!

public enum Tables extends TableMap {
    table1, table2, table3;
    public Tables(){
        super(table);
    }
}

Example throughout the code:

    // workaround!
    Tables.table1.MAP.method();
    Tables.table2.MAP.method();
    Tables.table3.MAP.method();
    ...

    // needed!
    Tables.table1.method();
    Tables.table2.method();
    Tables.table3.method();
    ...
share|improve this question
2  
The question (while seems to be a valuable, good one) is a bit unclear, please add more context. –  ppeterka Oct 3 '13 at 9:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you may be trying to put too much intelligence into the enum.

I have found this approach very useful. It avoids many of the issues arising from the fact that you cannot extend enums (well actually you can but not in a very useful way).

Essentially, make the enum a sub-class and pass its characteristics up to your super class as an EnumSet. This way you still get all the benefits of enums including type safety.

public static class MappedEnum<E extends Enum<E>> extends TreeMap<String, String> {
  public MappedEnum(EnumSet<E> e) {
    // Whatever you like with the set.
  }

  public void method(E e) {
  }

}

public static class Foo extends MappedEnum<Foo.Tables> {
  public enum Tables {
    table1, table2, table3;
  }

  public Foo() {
    super(EnumSet.allOf(Tables.class));
  }

  @Override
  public void method(Foo.Tables e) {
  }

}

You could probably even use an EnumMap instead of your TreeMap for better efficiency.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks interesting but doesn't seem to fit the problem: OP wants one instance of Foo per enum entry. –  Aaron Digulla Oct 3 '13 at 9:44
    
"I think you may be trying to put too much intelligence into the enum" - Yes, i really like enums for type-safety, and in this case, i really don't see a valid reason why a enum cannot be extended... –  marcolopes Oct 3 '13 at 9:58
2  
@AaronDigulla - The result of this refactor means that you can then use MappedEnum<Foo.Tables> tables = ... and then tables.method(Foo.table1). It turns the call mechanism inside-out but you now have a much clearer structure. PS - Added an E parameter to method. –  OldCurmudgeon Oct 3 '13 at 10:07
    
@OldCurmudgeon: Okay, it starts to make sense. My main critique now is that this means you need a switch in method() instead of relying on inheritance. Or you use an EnumMap to store one handler per enum value. –  Aaron Digulla Oct 3 '13 at 10:13
    
@AaronDigulla - In my experience you rarely need an enum-specific method, you just need each enum to be classified in some way. You can achieve that here by making the enum implement an interface that exposes its classification. MappedEnum then uses a Map as you describe but only to map the classifications. Using a case with enums is a code smell in my opinion. –  OldCurmudgeon Oct 3 '13 at 10:21

In Java, enum types must extend java.lang.Enum. Since Java types can every only extend a single type, you might think that public class TableMap extends Enum might work, but no, the compiler won't allow this.

In my own code, I use enums often as mere keys because they are so hostile. I have them implement a common interface and then use a factory to look up specific implementations of "worker" instances that I can then use.

One way to get closer to the syntax that you want is to use the delegate pattern:

public enum Tables {
    ...
    public void method() {
        MAP.method();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I understand, but not the best approach, there are too many methods! –  marcolopes Oct 3 '13 at 9:43
    
Use your IDE to generate the methods. –  Aaron Digulla Oct 3 '13 at 9:45
1  
in addition to that the Map interface has a values() method, which signature different from Enums so you can not have an enum implement Map –  Blank Chisui Oct 3 '13 at 9:46
    
@BlankChisui: Nice catch. My approach allows to rename the method so you can access it. But it rules out inheritance in this case even if we could achieve it in some way. –  Aaron Digulla Oct 3 '13 at 9:47

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