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I have a json like

{
    "key" : ["key1", "key2", "key3"],
    "value" : "v1";
}

I am De-serializing it to my Pojoclass using jackson, While De-serializing I want variable value to be type of List<String> whose size will depend on the size of variable key. So that final object will represent this Json.

{
     "key" : ["key1", "key2", "key3"],
     "value" : ["v1", "v1", "v1"];
}

So far my Pojo class is like this

public class Pojo {

@JsonProperty("key")
private List<String> key;
@JsonProperty("value")
private List<String> value;

@JsonProperty("key")
public List<String> getKey() {
    return key;
}

@JsonProperty("key")
public void setKey(List<String> key) {
    this.key = key;
}

@JsonProperty("value")
public List<String> getValue() {
    return value;
}

@JsonProperty("value")
public void setValue(String val) {
    List<String> arr = new ArrayList<String>();
    for (int i=0; i<key.size(); i++) {
        arr.add(val);
    }
    this.value = arr;
}

}

but I am getting JsonMappingException. While debugging I found that inside the setValue method variable key is null. Is there a way to set the value of variable key first?( before variable value)

share|improve this question
    
Why not change the getter instead, so that it's always the correct length when you get it? –  tom Oct 3 '13 at 10:02
    
I can't change getter because of compatibility issue, these are the old json format, but all the new json will be according to { "key" : ["key1", "key2", "key3"], "value" : ["v1", "v1", "v1"] } this structure, So in setter input parameter is type of Object. So my setter is public void setValue(Object val); and in method definition I am checking whether val is instance of String or List<?> –  Anurag Tripathi Oct 3 '13 at 10:10
1  
Again: bad design decision takes its tax... –  ppeterka Oct 3 '13 at 10:13
    
Are you saying there is no way to call these setter in specific order? –  Anurag Tripathi Oct 3 '13 at 10:17
    
You could always do it in the setter for the key as well - you'd need to put a check in for order and depending on which one comes first do something different –  tom Oct 3 '13 at 10:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should hide this ugly conversion in custom deserializer class. It could look like this:

class PojoJsonDeserializer extends JsonDeserializer<Pojo> {

    @Override
    public Pojo deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        InnerPojo innerPojo = jp.readValueAs(InnerPojo.class);

        return innerPojo.toPojo();
    }

    private static class InnerPojo {
        public List<String> key;
        public String value;

        Pojo toPojo() {
            Pojo pojo = new Pojo();
            pojo.setKey(new ArrayList<String>(key));
            pojo.setValue(valueNTimes(value, key.size()));

            return pojo;
        }

        private List<String> valueNTimes(String value, int nTimes) {
            List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>(nTimes);
            for (int index = 0; index < nTimes; index++) {
                result.add(value);
            }

            return result;
        }
    }
}

Your POJO class could look "natural" now:

@JsonDeserialize(using = PojoJsonDeserializer.class)
class Pojo {

    private List<String> key;
    private List<String> value;

    public List<String> getKey() {
        return key;
    }

    public void setKey(List<String> key) {
        this.key = key;
    }

    public List<String> getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public void setValue(List<String> value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Pojo [key=" + key + ", value=" + value + "]";
    }
}

Simple test program:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonParser;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonProcessingException;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.DeserializationContext;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.JsonDeserializer;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonDeserialize;

public class JacksonProgram {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        System.out.println(mapper.readValue(json, Pojo.class));
    }
}

prints:

Pojo [key=[key1, key2, key3], value=[v1, v1, v1]]
share|improve this answer

Setters are not supposed to perform computations on a Pojo to avoid exactly this kind of problems.

You could write another class that does simply stores the value. After deserialization you would have to map those to your broken class and ensure that the setters are called in the required order.

share|improve this answer
    
How does the order of calling setter method determined in jackson? Is it alphabetically or random or something else? –  Anurag Tripathi Oct 3 '13 at 10:41

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