Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If I have a column name that needs backticks because it contains a comma, setkey throws an error saying don't use a comma. The error directs me towards ?setkey but I don't see anything in the examples there that mentions this. Only work around I can find is to rename the column, setkey and then rename back.

Example code:

library(data.table)
> DT = data.table(`X, in $` = rnorm(10))
> DT
        X, in $
 1: -1.28475886
 2:  0.97789059
 3: -0.05023914
 4: -0.38133978
 5: -0.24949607
 6:  0.99213156
 7: -0.29310512
 8:  0.02840372
 9:  0.25294231
10: -0.88955013
> setkey(DT, `X, in $`)
Error in setkeyv(x, cols, verbose = verbose) : 
  Don't use comma inside quotes. Please see the examples in help('setkey')

Edit: showing a more likely example

For me the main reason you would come across this is after using reshape2 dcast to take character column values (which will be from an external source, e.g. database) and make them column names.

So long as you don't need the "join" behaviour of the key, and just wanted to sort, then you can work around this by copying the table, or by using data.frame instead. For example:

library(ggplot2)
library(reshape2)

DT = data.table(Office = rep(c("Cambridge, UK", "Cambridge, US", "London", "New York"), each = 12), Product = rep(1:12,4), Sales = rnorm(48)^2)
DF = dcast(DT, Product~Office)
DT = data.table(DF)
setkey(DT, 'Cambridge, UK')
DT = DT[order(DF$`Cambridge, UK`),]
DT

produces:

> library(ggplot2)
> library(reshape2)
> 
> DT = data.table(Office = rep(c("Cambridge, UK", "Cambridge, US", "London", "New York"), each = 12), Product = rep(1:12,4), Sales = rnorm(48)^2)
> DF = dcast(DT, Product~Office)
Using Sales as value column: use value.var to override.
> DT = data.table(DF)
> setkey(DT, 'Cambridge, UK')
Error in setkeyv(x, cols, verbose = verbose) : 
  Don't use comma inside quotes. Please see the examples in help('setkey')
> DT = DT[order(DF$`Cambridge, UK`),]
> DT
    Product Cambridge, UK Cambridge, US      London    New York
 1:      12  0.0009257347  1.7183751269 0.818101229 0.002499808
 2:       1  0.0010855828  0.0889560105 0.083778108 1.451149328
 3:       2  0.0139649148  0.7385617360 0.221688602 4.771307440
 4:       5  0.0520875574  0.3389613574 0.934932759 0.127634044
 5:      10  0.0837778446  0.0598955035 0.015930174 0.715849795
 6:       9  0.0856246191  1.1303900183 1.555058058 0.367063297
 7:       6  0.1608235273  0.7147643550 0.004588596 2.995598768
 8:       8  0.4797866129  0.1783997616 0.016459971 0.497328990
 9:       4  0.5282546636  1.7011670679 0.016126768 0.024388172
10:       7  0.5655147714  0.1106522938 0.045130643 0.442473457
11:       3  0.8315246051  0.1399159784 5.792956446 1.632060601
12:      11  3.9958208033  0.0005297928 0.003282897 1.635506818
share|improve this question
6  
Why can't you simply use valid names? – Roland Oct 3 '13 at 10:26
4  
No, that's not encouraged. Save the output for printing in a separate character vector. – Roland Oct 3 '13 at 11:37
1  
@Roland So what is the point of backticks then? Why does R allow arbitrary object names? – Corone Oct 3 '13 at 11:42
2  
Sometimes they're required when coercing between places where otherwise illegal names are allowed and where they're not allowed. Imagine a situation like: x <- c(1,2,3); names(x) <- c('a','b',3); names(x); as.list(x). – Thomas Oct 3 '13 at 12:21
5  
All philosophical differences aside on whether this naming scheme is a good idea, I think this is a bug and you should file a bug report. – eddi Oct 3 '13 at 15:07
up vote 4 down vote accepted

UPDATE (eddi): As of version 1.8.11 this bug has been fixed and arbitrary column names will work with setkey.


I found a hack: (1) sort and (2) settattr.

Example:

mydt <- data.table(`b,ah`=c(2L,3:1),var=letters[1:4])

mydt <- mydt[order(`b,ah`)]
setattr(mydt,'sorted','b,ah')

Now, to verify that it behaves well...

key(mydt)
# [1] "b,ah"
mydt[.(2)]
#    b,ah var
# 1:    2   a
# 2:    2   c
mydt[,.N,by=`b,ah`]
#    b,ah N
# 1:    1 1
# 2:    2 2
# 3:    3 1

Comments. I didn't use the OP's example because setting numeric big floating-point columns as keys is weird (to me).

Who knows what negative side effects this could have? Anyway, I wouldn't use it, and agree it would be nice to have commas supported. Maybe there could be a setkeyn for setting by column number if it makes too much of a mess in setkey/setkeyv?

share|improve this answer
2  
Frank, you are right. I've been a sloppy reader all day, I had read that and was thinking numbers. my bad. – Ricardo Saporta Oct 3 '13 at 21:40
2  
Great answer - this was the sort of thing I was looking for. Yes my example was silly in that sense - but you can use float-point columns for rolling joins. – Corone Oct 4 '13 at 8:32
    
@eddi: Nice; that was fast! Maybe you meant to edit the question instead of the answer...? Either way, it might make sense to put the update at the top of the question (to save people from taking the time to understand a historical/now-irrelevant bug). – Frank Oct 6 '13 at 1:13
    
good point, fixed – eddi Oct 6 '13 at 2:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.