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$VAR1 = [
          '830974',
          '722065',
          '722046',
          '716963'
        ];

How can I calculate the array index for the value "722065"?

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Just look for it with a for loop. What if there's two values in the array that are equal? –  Mark Canlas Dec 16 '09 at 16:17
1  
Did you try anything at all? Is this homework? –  jsoverson Dec 16 '09 at 18:37
    
@jsoverson: I'm new to perl. Self-learning project. –  Antonio Dec 16 '09 at 20:08
    
Since Perl 5.10, you can also use my ($index) = grep { $array[$_] ~~ $element } 0 .. $#array;. See here: stackoverflow.com/a/3222653/111036 –  mivk May 29 at 11:19

9 Answers 9

up vote 27 down vote accepted

The firstidx function from List::MoreUtils can help:

use strict;
use warnings;
use List::MoreUtils qw(firstidx);

my @nums = ( '830974', '722065', '722046', '716963' );
printf "item with index %i in list is 722065\n", firstidx { $_ eq '722065' } @nums;

__END__
item with index 1 in list is 722065
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6  
I like the use of List::MoreUtils, good answer! –  chollida Dec 16 '09 at 16:29
1  
Using numeric comparison with string values is not a good idea (even though it does not matter in this case. What happens when you have ZIP codes and 07030 in the list. perl -e 'print 0 + (07030 == "07030")' –  Sinan Ünür Dec 16 '09 at 17:24
    
@Sinan: you are correct. I edited my answer to perform a string comparison. –  toolic Dec 16 '09 at 18:01
1  
It would be a much better answer if it used Standard Perl. –  tchrist Apr 14 '11 at 0:00
1  
works like a charm! –  Gordon May 10 '11 at 15:50

using List::Util, which is a core module, unlike List::MoreUtils, which is not:

use List::Util qw(first);

my @nums = ( '830974', '722065', '722046', '716963' );
my $index = first { $nums[$_] eq '722065' } 0..$#nums;
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Here is how you would find all the positions at which a given value appears:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @x = ( 1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1 );
my @i = grep { $x[$_] == 3 } 0 .. $#x;
print "@i\n";

If you only need the first index, you should use List::MoreUtils::first_index.

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1  
Honestly. Lose the mention of $[. It's obscure, IIRC deprecated and there is no honest reason to use it. –  tsee Dec 16 '09 at 17:33
    
@tsee You right. It was silly of me to even mention $[. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 16 '09 at 17:50
2  
That's Perl street cred material, thought :-) –  Leonardo Herrera Dec 16 '09 at 18:44

If you only need to look up the one item, use firstidx as others have said.

If you need to do many lookups, build an index.

If your array items are unique, building an index is quite simple. But it's not much more difficult to build one that handles duplicate items. Examples of both follow:

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;

# Index an array with unique elements.
my @var_uniq  = qw( 830974 722065 722046 716963 );
my %index_uniq  = map { $var_uniq[$_] => $_ } 0..$#var_uniq;

# You could use hash slice assinment instead of map:
# my %index_uniq;
# @index_uniq{ @var_uniq } = 0..$#var_uniq

my $uniq_index_of_722065   = $index_uniq{722065};
print "Uniq 72665 at: $uniq_index_of_722065\n";
print Dumper \%index_uniq;

# Index an array with repeated elements.
my @var_dupes = qw( 830974 722065 830974 830974 722046 716963 722065 );
my %index_dupes;
for( 0..$#var_dupes ) {
    my $item = $var_dupes[$_];

    # have item in index?
    if( $index_dupes{$item} ) {
        # Add to array of indexes
        push @{$index_dupes{$item}}, $_;
    }
    else {
        # Add array ref with index to hash.
        $index_dupes{$item} = [$_];
    }
}

# Dereference array ref for assignment:
my @dupe_indexes_of_722065 = @{ $index_dupes{722065} };

print "Dupes 722065 at: @dupe_indexes_of_722065\n";
print Dumper \%index_dupes;
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Here's hastily written attempt at a reverse look-up using a hash.

my $VAR1 = [ '830974', '722065', '722046', '716963' ];

my %reverse;
$reverse{$VAR1->[$_]} = $_ for 0 .. @$VAR1 - 1;

print $reverse{722065};

This does not account for arrays with duplicate values. I do not endorse this solution for production code.

share|improve this answer
    
In the case of duplicate values you'll just get the first element that matches. This can be really useful if a long-lived array is queried more than once. –  Leonardo Herrera Dec 16 '09 at 18:51
2  
I'm not sure if I understand the comment above, but the way the code is written, in the case of duplicate values, the highest index wins. –  Mark Canlas Dec 16 '09 at 18:56

Check out the discussion on perlmonks: http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=66003

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Be aware that this is a link to a golf contest. While the linked site demonstrates different algorithms and techniques with significant pedagogical value, care should be taken when adapting this code for production use. Remember, golf is judged primarily on have the smallest number of characters--this is not a good way to think about your production code. –  daotoad Apr 26 '10 at 6:35

check out the Perl FAQ

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6  
Everyone ought to read the FAQ list at least once a year. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 16 '09 at 17:19
3  
RRTFM-ing (Re-reading the fine manual) is an amazingly rewarding experience. The first time I read the docs, much of it went right over my head. Each subsequent reading has revealed new meaning. It's amazing the number of things you can learn by (re)reading the manual! –  daotoad Dec 16 '09 at 17:36
2  
I'd be satisfied if most people at least read it once. People constantly ask how relevant the FAQ is, and StackOverflow has been a great natural experiment: everyone re-asks the FAQ questions. –  brian d foy Dec 16 '09 at 20:02
1  
@daotoad: maybe that's because I keep changing the FAQ on you. :) –  brian d foy Dec 16 '09 at 20:03
use strict;
use Data::Dumper;

sub invert
{
 my $i=0;
 map { $i++ => $_ } @_;
}

my @a = ('a','b','c','d','e');

print Dumper @a;

print Dumper invert @a;
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1  
use strict; use Data::Dumper; sub mirror { my $i=0; map { $i++ => \$_ } @{ shift @_ }; } my @a = ('a','b','c','d','e'); my %b = mirror \@a; print Dumper @a; print Dumper %b; $a[1] = 'whoa...'; print Dumper @a; print Dumper %b; $a[3] = 'IKNOWRIGHT!'; print Dumper @a; print Dumper %b; –  user549325 Dec 21 '10 at 0:15

it's okay, everyone was new to perl at one point

$a is the element to print the index of in @list...

my @list = (124124, 323, 156666, 124412, 3333, 4444444444, 124124124, 24412);
my $a = 4444444444;

print 
substr($_=($,=
chr($==39)).(
join$,,@list).$,,$=-$=,
index$_,$,.$a.$,)=~
tr/'//+$=---$=;
share|improve this answer
    
Off-by-one error? It prints out '6', but I would expect '5'. –  toolic Dec 16 '09 at 18:22
7  
If your purpose is to help a newbie, you should not post obfuscated code. If your purpose is to impress people, you might want to spell Perl correctly. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 16 '09 at 18:28
    
@toolic: it's the 6th element of the list, i didnt start at 0. if you want to start at 0 you'll have to change the last line to tr/'//+$=-$=; –  John Dec 16 '09 at 18:50
2  
@john: The question specifically asks for the index. Indices start at zero. Not only have you posted an unhelpful answer in a misguided effort to look cool, but you have failed to understand the question in the first place. –  Adam Bellaire Dec 16 '09 at 19:16
4  
This answer is a waste of server space. You can delete answers to save your dwindling reputation though. It will still waste server space though. :) –  brian d foy Dec 16 '09 at 20:01

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