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I would like to check the type of a superclass A against the type of a subclass B (with a method inside the superclass A, so that B will inherit it).

Here's what I thought did the trick (that is, the use of forward declaration):

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

using namespace std;

class B;

class A {
  public:
    int i_;
    void Check () {
      if (typeid (*this) == typeid (B))
        cout << "True: Same type as B." << endl;
      else
        cout << "False: Not the same type as B." << endl;
    }
};

class B : public A {
  public:
    double d_;
};


int main () {

  A a;
  B b;

  a.Check (); // should be false
  b.Check (); // should be true

  return 0;
}

However this code does not compile. The error I get is:

main.cc: In member function ‘void A::Check()’:
main.cc:12: error: invalid use of incomplete type ‘struct B’
main.cc:6: error: forward declaration of ‘struct B’

How could I solve this problem?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think that the problem you are trying to solve is much better handled by a virtual method:

class A
{
    public:
        virtual bool Check() { return false; };
}


class B : public A
{
    public:
        // override A::Check()
        virtual bool Check() { return true; };
}

Methods in the base class A should not need to know whether the object is "really" an A or a B. That's a violation of basic object-oriented design principles. If the behavior needs to change when the object is a B, then that behavior should be defined in B and handled by virtual method calls.

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It did not occur to me that I was violating basic OOP principles. Not to mention that what I was trying to do did not work. As you suggested, I rewrote everything using virtual functions. Thanks! –  Jir Dec 16 '09 at 16:44

Just move the definition of Check() out of the body of A:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

using namespace std;

class B;

class A {
  public:
    int i_;
    void Check ();
};

class B : public A {
  public:
    double d_;
};

void A::Check () {
  if (typeid (*this) == typeid (B))
    cout << "True: Same type as B." << endl;
  else
    cout << "False: Not the same type as B." << endl;
}

int main () {

  A a;
  B b;

  a.Check (); // should be false
  b.Check (); // should be true

  return 0;
}
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Thank for the quick answer! What you suggested actually worked. However I preferred rewriting everything in terms of virtual functions. –  Jir Dec 16 '09 at 16:48

One way would be to pull the definition of Check out of the class definition, so that B is defined when the compiler gets to the function definition.

class A {
    //...
    void Check();
    //...
};
class B { /* ... */ };

void A::Check() {
    //...
}
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Move your definition of the Check below your declaration of class B.

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Just move the function body after the declaration of B.

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

struct A
{
	int i_;
	void Check();
};

struct B :  A
{
	double d_;
};

void A::Check()
{
	using namespace std;
	if (typeid (*this) == typeid (B))
	{
		cout << "True: Same type as B." << endl;
	}
	else
	{
		cout << "False: Not the same type as B." << endl;
	}
}

int main()
{
	A a;
	B b;

	a.Check(); // should be false
	b.Check(); // should be true

	return 0;
}
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Hi, even if you put the definition of A::Check outside the class the result won't be what you expect. This is because the B object this convert to an A object in the method so this points on a A object thus the typeids are always different. To solve this declare the method virtual.

However, I still don't understand why you want to perform such a test O_o ?? And as CAdaker said this is not good practice

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I'd like to do that in order to trigger different methods, based on the type of class. if b.Check() then b.method_in_the_subclass(); else b.method_in_the_superclass(); But thanks to all your hints I see this hardly can be considered good practice. –  Jir Dec 16 '09 at 17:52

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