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#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#define NO_OF_THREADS 5

void print_function(int* i)
{
 int count;
 for(count=0; count<10; count++)
  printf("Hello world from thread %d\n",*i);
 pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main()
{
 pthread_t printThreads[NO_OF_THREADS];
 int thread_no[NO_OF_THREADS];
 int i;

 for(i=0; i<NO_OF_THREADS; i++)
 {
  thread_no[i] = i;
  pthread_create(&printThreads[i], NULL, print_function,&thread_no[i]);
 }

 int j;
 for(j=0;j<NO_OF_THREADS;j++)
  pthread_join(printThreads[j],NULL);
 puts("Main over and out");
 return 0;
}

Without just passing the address of the counter variable i directly as an argument for the pthread_create function, it is first assigned to an unused slot of an array and then the address of the array element is passed as the argument. This is done to avoid a race condition accessing i between parent thread and created threads. Explain what will happen if variable i is directly passed to a thread.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you pass the address of i to each thread in the pthread_create() call, then you have no guarantee about what value each thread will see in the variable. It could be that thread 0 will see a value such as 2 or 3, because even though i was 0 when the pthread_create() was called, by the time the thread was running and reads the variable, the value has been changed by the main thread.

For example, with this mildly modified version of your code, the output I got was:

Hello world from thread 3
Hello world from thread 4
Hello world from thread 4
Hello world from thread 3
Hello world from thread 5
Hello world from thread 5
Hello world from thread 5
...
Hello world from thread 5
Hello world from thread 5
Hello world from thread 5
Main over and out

Modified code:

Removed <math.h> and repeats of <stdio.h> and <pthread.h>; removed the thread_no variable; fixed the type of the thread function to match what pthread_create() expects, etc.

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define NO_OF_THREADS 5

void *print_function(void *ip);
void *print_function(void *ip)
{
    int *i = ip;
    int count;
    for(count=0; count<10; count++)
        printf("Hello world from thread %d\n",*i);
    pthread_exit(NULL);
    return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    pthread_t printThreads[NO_OF_THREADS];
    int i;

    for(i=0; i<NO_OF_THREADS; i++)
    {
        pthread_create(&printThreads[i], NULL, print_function,&i);
    }

    int j;
    for(j=0;j<NO_OF_THREADS;j++)
        pthread_join(printThreads[j],NULL);
    puts("Main over and out");
    return 0;
}

When I revised the code to print pthread_self() as well as *i, I got the output:

0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 1
0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 4
0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 5
0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 5
0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 5
0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 5
0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 5
0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 5
0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 5
0x10800f000: Hello world from thread 5
0x108092000: Hello world from thread 5
0x108115000: Hello world from thread 5
0x108198000: Hello world from thread 5
0x10821b000: Hello world from thread 5

Four of the threads only ever saw the value 5; one of them (presumably 'thread 0') got to see the values 1 and 4 too. The behaviour is non-deterministic, too. Here was the start of another run:

0x10432b000: Hello world from thread 3
0x1043ae000: Hello world from thread 4
0x104431000: Hello world from thread 4
0x1044b4000: Hello world from thread 4
0x104537000: Hello world from thread 5
0x10432b000: Hello world from thread 5
0x1043ae000: Hello world from thread 5

In both cases, the remainder of the entries were the various threads echoing 5.

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thank you very much this is the answer i want.now i can undestand – user2842476 Oct 3 '13 at 14:53

The variable can be passed "directly" without risk, as long as it's successfully cast to and from void *, of course. There is no need for the per-thread buffering if that approach is used.

Passing the address of a single location (that of i in main()) whose content changes as more threads are created, is of course madness.

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This is done to avoid a race condition accessing i between parent thread and created threads.if I pssed i directly to a thread what will happen?? i want to know about it?? – user2842476 Oct 3 '13 at 12:11

You can pass it directly no issues and you have to cast it to an integer as its type is void * in pthread_create

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This is done to avoid a race condition accessing i between parent thread and created threads.if I pssed i directly to a thread what will happen?? i want to know about it?? – user2842476 Oct 3 '13 at 13:05
    
You can pass the address of i, but you can't guarantee what value any of the threads will see in the variable passed. That's why the separate variable is used. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 3 '13 at 14:22

What is the purpose of thread_no[]? Do you want to change it anywhere? If not (and as I see it's the case here), then there are no worries about any race conditions as you are passing different thread_no[i] to different threads and you are setting it's value before spawning thread you are passing it to. So thread_no[i] will not be passed or accessed before i thread will be spawned. Just pass thread_no[i] not &thread_no[i] or just pass i (because it's the same).

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