Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I understand that neither a abstract class nor an interface can contain a method that is both abstract and static because of ambiguity problems, but is there a workaround?

I want to have either an abstract class or an interface that mandates the inclusion of a static method in all of the classes that extend/implement this class/interface. Is there a way to do this in Java? If not, this may be my final straw with Java...

EDIT 1: The context of this problem is that I have a bunch of classes, call them Stick, Ball, and Toy for now, that have a bunch of entries in a database. I want to create a superclass/interface called Fetchable that requires a static method getFetchables() in each of the classes below it. The reason the methods in Stick, Ball, and Toy have to be static is because they will be talking to a database to retrieve all of the entries in the database for each class.

EDIT 2: To those who say you cannot do this in any language, that is not true. You can certainly do this in Ruby where class methods are inherited. This is not a case of someone not getting OO, this is a case of missing functionality in the Java language. You can try to argue that you should never need to inherit static (class) methods, but that is utterly wrong and I will ignore any answers that make such points.

share|improve this question
3  
@R. Bemrose: For those of us who are not C# programmers, can you explain how C# is different from Java in terms of the "weird static method inheritance"? Last time I checked Java doesn't support inheritance of static methods. –  Asaph Dec 16 '09 at 16:55
2  
-1 for stubbornness. As one of the people who disagree with your approach I find it silly of you to exclude my opinion. –  Cogsy Dec 17 '09 at 1:14
2  
Regarding your comment on "you can do this in Ruby", I think this just highlights the fact that static methods are not the same as class methods, and Ruby has class methods (so does e.g. Smalltalk and Delphi and Python). Java doesn't have class methods. The difference is that in languages with class methods, class itself is an object, and subclass is also an object of a type derived from the type of its superclass. Thus you have normal inheritance rules for classes, with virtual dispatch, overrides etc. Java doesn't have that, hence no static overrides, hence no static abstract. –  Pavel Minaev Dec 17 '09 at 1:31
1  
-1 for down-voting answers to your own question. It is bad manners to down-vote people who have made the effort to answer ... even if they've got it totally wrong. –  Stephen C Dec 17 '09 at 4:41
2  
@GaryF - all i mean is that it is bad practice to have a non-static method that does things that have nothing to do with an instance of the class (fetching all records from the DB has nothing to do with individual instances => static). –  twolfe18 Dec 17 '09 at 22:39

14 Answers 14

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have a couple of options:

  1. Use reflection to see if the method exists and then call it.
  2. Create an annotation for the static method named something like @GetAllWidgetsMethod.

  3. As others have said, try to not use a static method.

share|improve this answer
2  
can you explain how the annotation solution would work (2)? –  twolfe18 Dec 16 '09 at 17:19
    
Basically, you could look at the class's static methods and see if one has the annotation and then call it. Neither option 1 or 2 provide a way of enforcing that at compile time, however. –  Dave Dec 16 '09 at 18:50

There are lots of answers about 'this does'nt make sense..' but indeed I met a similar problem just yesterday.

I wanted to use inheritance with my unit tests. I have an API and several its implementations. So I need only 1 set of unit tests for all implementations but with different setUp methods which are static.

Workaround: all tests are abstract classes, with some static fields with protected access modifier. In all implementations I added static methods which set these static fields. It works rather nice, and I avoided copy and paste.

share|improve this answer
1  
this is pretty much equivalent to what I am going to do, with some tweaks. I need to worry about the return type for the static methods though. –  twolfe18 Dec 16 '09 at 17:22

Is there a way to do this in Java?

I don't think there is a way to do this in any language. There's no point to it, since static methods belong to a class and can't be called polymorphically. And enabling polymorphic calls is the only reason for interfaces and abstract classes to exist.

share|improve this answer
    
so in each of the subclasses i just need to write a static method getAllWidgets, there's no way to indicate programmatically that that method exists? –  twolfe18 Dec 16 '09 at 17:02
    
How would you call it? besides, there's probably a better solution: have that method fully implemented in a base class, taking a Class object as parameter - the base class constructor can take cake or registering all instances. –  Michael Borgwardt Dec 16 '09 at 17:10
1  
@Michael what you describes is similar to what I ended up doing. but to your first question, say class A extended this abstract class which required abstract static getBlahBlah(), you would call it like A.getBlahBlah(). I don't really see why people are taking this so poorly, I don't think I'm asking something unreasonable. –  twolfe18 Dec 16 '09 at 17:13
    
@Michael, also, I know that in my previous comment that you can't have an abstract static class, and that if you called (A's super class).getBlahBlah() there would be a ambiguity problem, but my original question was about a workaround to this problem. –  twolfe18 Dec 16 '09 at 17:15
    
The thing is: interfaces and abstract classes are part of the language's formal type system. The methods you need aren't - they're a convention for the convenience of the programmer. –  Michael Borgwardt Dec 16 '09 at 17:20

I too am dealing with this problem. For those that insist that it "doesn't make sense", I would invite you to think outside of that semantic box for a moment. The program I am working with is inherently about reflection.

Reflection, as you know, can take three orders of magnitude longer than straight-up binary function calling. That is an inevitable problem, and the software needs to port to as many machines as possible, some of which will be 32 bit and slower than my development machine to begin with. Thus, the applicability of a class to the requested operation needs to be checked via a static method, and all of the reflective methods are run at once during module booting.

Everything works, first and foremost. I've built the entire thing. The only catch is that a module can be compiled in a .class without compile time checking to see if the identifying static function exists at all, resulting in an innately useless class. Without the identifier, and its included information, for security's sake the module is not loaded.

I clearly understand the issue with the complete definition of "abstract" and "static", and understand that they don't make sense together. However, the ability to have a class method that is compiler-enforced for inclusion is lacking in Java, and as much as I like the language, I miss it. Thus, this is a human constraint on every programmer that ever works on the software, which I'm sure we can all agree is a pain.

share|improve this answer
    
this does not answer the question and is more like a langthy comment –  oers Oct 26 '12 at 12:22

A type system allows you to express some constraints among types, but it's limited. That's why javadocs are littered with constraints in human language, asking people to follow rules that the compiler cannot check.

if you want to extend it beyond what language provides natively, you can write your own static analysis tool. that is not uncommon. for example: findbug. also IDEs do that too, they checking thing beyond what language dictates. you can write a plug in to enforce that a subclass must have a static method of such signature.

in your case, it's not worth it. have javadoc in the superclass urge implementors to include a static method, that's good enough.

I'll provide a convoluted way of expressing your constraint anyway, but DO NO DO IT. people get really carried away of make everything checkable at compile time, at the price of making code unreadable.

interface WidgetEnumerator
{
    List getAllWidgets();
}

public class Abs<T extends WidgetEnumerator>
{
    static List getAllWidgets(Class<? extends Abs> clazz){ ... }
}

public class Sub extends Abs<SubWidgetEnumerator>
{
}

public class SubWidgetEnumerator implements WidgetEnumerator
{
    public List getAllWidgets() { ... }
}

How it works: for any subclass of Abs, it is forced to provide an implementation of WidgetEnumerator. subclass author cannot forget that. Now invocation Abs.getAllWidgets(Sub.class) contains sufficient information to resolve that implementation, i.e. SubWidgetEnumerator. It is done through reflection, but it is type safe, there are no string literals involved.

share|improve this answer

I think I can give you a better answer after seeing your edits--your best bet is probably a factory pattern. (Not lovely, but better than singleton).

abstract class Widget
    public static Widget[] getAllWidgetsOfType(Class widgetType) {
        if(widgetType instanceof ...)
    }
class Ball extends Widget
class Stick extends Widget
class Toy extends Widget

This is not a very good way to do it, but it's typical. Hibernate is the tool you would normally use to solve this problem, this is exactly what it's designed for.

The big problem is that it requires editing the base class whenever you add a new class of a given type. This can't be gotten around without reflection. If you want to use reflection, then you can implement it this way (Psuedocode, I'm not going to look up the exact syntax for the reflection, but it's not much more complex than this):

public static Widget[] getAllWidgetsOfType(Class widgetType) {
    Method staticMethod=widgetType.getStaticMethod("getAllInstances");
    return staticMethod.invoke();
}

This would give the solution you were asking for (to be bothered by the need to modify the base class each time you add a child class is a good instinct).

You could also make it an instance method instead of a static. It's not necessary, but you could then prototype the method (abstract) in Widget.

Again, all this is unnecessary and sloppy compared to Hibernate...

Edit: If you passed in a live "Empty" instance of a ball, stick or toy instead of it's "Class" object, you could then just call an inherited method and not use reflection at all. This would also work but you have to expand the definition of a Widget to include an "Empty" instance used as a key.

share|improve this answer

Static methods are relevant to an entire class of object, not the individual instances. Allowing a static method to be overridden breaks this dictum.

The first thing I would consider is to access your database from a non-static context. This is actually the norm for Java apps.

If you absolutely must use a static method, then have it parameterised with instance specific arguments (of a generic type) to allow the different subclasses to interact with it. Then call that single static method from you polymorphic methods.

share|improve this answer

No. You can't do that. If you're willing to compromise and make the method non-static or provide an implementation of the static method in your abstract class, you'll be able to code this in Java.

share|improve this answer

Create a context interface containing your method with a name that matches your problem domain. (Name it "World" if you absolutely have to, but most of the time there's a better name)

Pass around implementation instances of the context object.

share|improve this answer
    
kind of ugly, but it could work. i probably wouldn't use this though because its uglier than my current solution which is to just have a version of that static method in each of my subclasses. –  twolfe18 Dec 16 '09 at 17:18

static methods can't be abstract because they aren't virtual. Therefore anywhere that calls them has to have the concrete type with the implementation. If you want to enforce that all implementations of an interface have a certain static method, then that suggests a unit test is required.

abstract class A
{
    public static void foo()
    {
        java.lang.System.out.println("A::foo");
    }

    public void bar()
    {

        java.lang.System.out.println("A::bar");
    }
}

class B extends A
{
    public static void foo()
    {
        java.lang.System.out.println("B::foo");
    }

    public void bar()
    {

        java.lang.System.out.println("B::bar");
    }
}

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        B b = new B();
        b.foo();
        b.bar();

        A a = b;
        a.foo();
        a.bar();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

For what it is worth I know exactly what you are trying to do.

I found this article while searching for the reasons I can't do it either.

In my case I have HUNDREDS of classes that inherit from a central base base and I want simply to get a reference like this:

ValueImSearchingFor visf = StaticClass.someArbitraryValue()

I do NOT want to write/maintain someArbitraryValue() for each and every one of hundreds of the inherited classes -- I just want to write logic once and have it calc a Unique Class-Sepcific value for each and every future written class WITHOUT touching the base class.

Yes I completely get OO - I've been writing Java for about as long as it's been available.

These specific classes are more like "Definitions" as opposed to actual Objects and I don't want to instantiate one every time I just need to see what someArbitraryValue() actually is.

Think of it as a PUBLIC STATIC FINAL that allows you to run a Method ONCE to set it initially. (Kinda like you can do when you define an Enum actually...)

share|improve this answer

It doesn't make sense to do what you're asking:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/370962/why-cant-static-methods-be-abstract-in-java/370966#370966

share|improve this answer
    
how does it not make sense to do what i'm asking. if you had a couple classes that all needed a static method getAllWidgets (where widget is the superclass or interface), why is it unreasonable to want to require a static method (in each of the subclasses) getAllWidgets that returns a collection of instances of the subclass/class that implements the interface? –  twolfe18 Dec 16 '09 at 17:01
    
-1 for not reading my question. –  twolfe18 Dec 16 '09 at 21:11

Ok, maybe my question was poorly asked, it seems like most of you didn't get what I was trying to do. Nonetheless, I have a solution that is somewhat satisfactory.

In the abstract super class, I am going to have a static method getAllWidgets(Class type). In it I'll check the class you passed it and do the correct fetching based on that. Generally I like to avoid passing around classes and using switches on stuff like this, but I'll make an exception here.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's a very common case of badly-asked question: you had already decided on an (unworkable) solution to your actual problem and then asked how to get that solution to work without mentioning your actual motivation. BTW, you shouldn't have to use a switch here, a Map<Class, List<Widget>> should do the trick. Should even be possible to use a generic type parameter so that the method becomes typesafe. –  Michael Borgwardt Dec 16 '09 at 17:24
1  
You don't really seem to get OO (as most answers here have pointed out). I'll give you one hint, if you are relying on static methods for more than trivial functions, you're doing it wrong. If you posted more of your problem we might be able to help you but as with most programming problems, it's hard to solve correctly without a much bigger picture. I would suggest you redo your design with no statics at all to break yourself of the habit for starters. I wish there was an easy way to share UML style design diagrams--seeing yours might help too. –  Bill K Dec 16 '09 at 17:55
1  
@twolfe: your "trivial" methods aren't trivial, because of the problems you're running into here. If you need polymorphism, they cannot (and should not) be static methods. –  Andrzej Doyle Dec 16 '09 at 18:27
1  
@Andrzej - 1. the methods are trivial, working them into Java seems not so trivial. 2. do you really think that a method that fetches a bunch of objects irrespective of the context should not be static? 3. what is wrong with inheritance of static methods? it seems like everyone here is arguing: "Java doesn't let you do it, so it must be wrong!" Anyone have any real reasons why you shouldn't have polymorphism and static methods together? –  twolfe18 Dec 16 '09 at 18:41
1  
@twolfe18 You seem to need different WidgetCollections instances, not a singleton (otherwise you wouldn't be asking about different static methods)--but as I said, I don't have a big enough picture to feel sure about that. Also a "WidgetCollection" sounds generic, not really like a business class. Usually such an object is attached to or created from another object, so you rarely need things like static factory methods either (usually these are another indication that your OO could be better). I understand not liking OO, but if you're going to do it then don't go at it half assed. –  Bill K Dec 16 '09 at 23:04

I'd make a WidgetCollection class with an abstract Widget inner class.

You can extend the WidgetCollection.Widget class for each of your types of Widget.

No static methods necessary.

Example (not compiled or tested):

class WidgetCollection<W extends Widget> {
    Set<W> widgets = new HashSet<W>();

    Set<W> getAll() {
        return widgets;
    }

    abstract class Widget {

       Widget() {
           widgets.add(this);
       }

       abstract String getName();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
         WidgetCollection<AWidget> aWidgets = new WidgetCollection<AWidget>();
         a.new AWidget();

         Set<AWidget> widgets = aWidgets.getAll();
    }
}

class AWidget extends Widget {
    String getName() {
        return "AWidget";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.