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I'm using this approach: First find the largest among 5 numbers then save the subscript of array of the largest number in an "ivariable" after displaying the largest number, do like this
array[ivariable] = 0 ; so that first largest set to zero and its no longer here in the array. And do the same again, find the largest, but I'm not getting what I'm trying to. Its a logical error. Thanks

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main(void)
{
    int counter, large,number,det_2, i , large3, det_3= 0;
    int det[5] = {0,0,0,0,0};

    for(int k(0); k < 5 ; k++)
    {
        cout << "Enter the number  " << endl ;
        cin >> det[k] ;
    }

    for( i; i<5; i++)
    {
        large = det[i] ;
        if (large > det_2)
        {
            det_2= large ;
            counter = i ;
        }
        else 
        {

        }
    }
    cout << "Largest among all is  " << det_2 << endl;
    det[i] = 0 ;

    for( int j(0); j<5; j++)
    {
        large3 = det[j] ;
        if(large3 > det_3)
        {
            det_3= large3 ;                  
        }
        else 
        {

        }
    }
    cout << "Second largest  " << large3 << endl ;

    system("PAUSE");
}
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4  
One problem is that you don't initialize det_2 before comparing against it. –  Markku K. Oct 3 '13 at 14:34
    
Look up std::max_element. –  Fred Larson Oct 3 '13 at 14:36
    
what do you expect the comparison result for large > det_2 where det_2 holds garbage value –  exex zian Oct 3 '13 at 14:37
2  
A side note: else { } (with an empty statement block) is useless and only makes your code more verbose. You can remove it. –  Cassio Neri Oct 3 '13 at 14:39
1  
@sansix yes you were right –  Arsala Kamal Oct 4 '13 at 9:01
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've got possible syntax and initialization errors. Fix those first:

for(int k(0); k < 5 ; k++): I've never seen an integer initialized this way. Shouldn't it be:

for (int k = 0; k < 5; k++) ? (Same with the last loop.)

Also,

for( i; i<5; i++)

The variable i is uninitialized. Variables are not initialized to any default value in C++. Because you've left it uninitialized, it might execute 5 times, no times, or 25,899 times. You don't know.

This should be:

for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)

But the whole thing could probably be a bit clearer anyway:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main(void)
{
    int largest = -1;
    int second_largest = -1;

    int index_of_largest = -1;
    int index_of_second_largest = -1;

    int det[5] = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0};

    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        cout << "Enter the number  " << endl;
        cin >> det[i];  // assuming non-negative integers!
    }

    for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++)  // find the largest
    {
        if (det[j] >= largest)
        {
            largest = det[j];
            index_of_largest = j;
        }
    }

    for (int k = 0; k < 5; k++)  // find the second largest
    {
        if (k != index_of_largest) // skip over the largest one
        {
            if (det[k] >= second_largest)
            {
                second_largest = det[k];
                index_of_second_largest = k;
            }
        }
    }

    cout << "Largest is " << largest << " at index " << index_of_largest << endl;
    cout << "Second largest is " << second_largest <<
            " at index " << index_of_second_largest << endl;

return 0;
}
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Yes the problem was i didn't initialize each variable separately –  Arsala Kamal Oct 4 '13 at 8:56
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Always give your variables values before you use them

det_2 = det[0];
counter = 0;
for (i = 1; i < 5; i++)
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Yes i will be careful about this in future. Thanks –  Arsala Kamal Oct 4 '13 at 8:57
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  • first problem I saw was that you are iterating using i as an index, but you don't initialize i.

code should be:

    for(i = 0; i<5; i++)
         ^^^^
  • same goes for det_2. You compare elements against it, but do not initialize it. You should set it to det[0] before the loop where you use it.

  • third problem: Your "set largest value to zero after printing" sounds like it is there so that you can apply the same algorithm the second time.

You should create an additional function that gives you the index of the largest element, and call it like this:

int index = find_largest_index(a);
cout << "largest element: " << a[index] << endl;
a[index] = 0;
cout << "second largest element: " << a[ find_largest_index(a) ] << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
Yes sometimes unfortunate preference can lead to unexpected results what i did is didn't initialize each variable separately. –  Arsala Kamal Oct 4 '13 at 8:58
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GCC 4.7.3: g++ -Wall -Wextra -std=c++0x largest.cpp

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>

int main() {
  std::cout << "Enter 5 numbers: ";

  // Read 5 numbers.
  std::vector<int> v;
  for (auto i = 0; i < 5; ++i) {
    int x = 0;
    while (!(std::cin >> x)) {
      // Error. Reset and try again.
      std::cin.clear();
      std::cin.ignore();
    }
    v.push_back(x);
  }

  // partition on element 3 (4th number)
  std::nth_element(std::begin(v), std::next(std::begin(v), 3), std::end(v));

  std::cout << "Two largest are: ";
  std::copy(std::next(std::begin(v), 3), std::end(v), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
}
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I think you're using linked list data structure approach? right? –  Arsala Kamal Oct 4 '13 at 9:01
    
@ArsalaKamal, what makes you think that? I am using a container, but it is not a linked list, it is a vector (array). –  Adam Burry Oct 4 '13 at 11:41
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In the specific case of 5 elements, the algorithm you use is unlikely to make any real difference.

That said, the standard algorithm specifically designed for this kind of job is std::nth_element.

It allows you to find the (or "an", if there are duplicates) element that would end up on position N if you were to sort the entire collection.

That much is pretty obvious from the name. What's not so obvious (but is still required) is that nth_element also arranges the elements into two (or three, depending on how you look at it) groups: the elements that would short before that element, the element itself, and the elements that would sort after that element. Although the elements are not sorted inside of each of those groups, they are arranged into those groups -- i.e., all the elements that would sort before it are placed before it, then the element itself, then the elements that would sort after it.

That gives you exactly what you want -- the 4th and 5th elements of the 5 you supply.

As I said originally, in the case of just 5 elements, it won't matter much -- but if you wanted (say) the top 50000 out of ten million, choosing the right algorithm would make a much bigger difference.

share|improve this answer
    
indeed informative. –  Arsala Kamal Oct 4 '13 at 8:53
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