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So I have a vector of ints named bList that has information already in it. I have it sorted before running the binary search.

//I have already inserted random ints into the vector


//Sort it
bubbleSort();
//Empty Line for formatting
cout << "\n";
//Print out sorted array.
print();

cout << "It will now search for a value using binary search\n";

int val = binSearch(54354);
cout<<val;

My bubble sort algorithm does work.

I have it returning an int which is the location of the searched value in the list.

//Its one argument is the value you are searching for.
int binSearch(int isbn) {
    int lower = 0;
    int upper = 19;//Vector size is 20.
    int middle = (lower + upper) / 2;

    while (lower < upper) {
        middle = (lower + upper) / 2;
        int midVal = bList[middle];

        if (midVal == isbn) {
            return middle;
            break;
        } else if (isbn > midVal) {
            lower = midVal + 1;
        } else if (isbn < midVal) {
            upper - midVal - 1;
        }
    }

}

But for some reason, when I run it, it just keeps running and doesn't return anything.

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1  
I recommend that you step through the code, line by line, with a debugger. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 3 '13 at 15:05
2  
Note that the break statement after the return isn't needed. –  Pete Becker Oct 3 '13 at 15:07
    
If the value you're looking for is not in the array, you will reach the end of the function without returning anything. You should at least return some form value_not_found at the end. –  GuyGreer Oct 3 '13 at 15:09
    
An aside: the usual way to calculate middle to avoid overflow is: middle = lower + (upper - lower) / 2 –  Adam Burry Oct 3 '13 at 15:10
    
Would a thrown 'value not found' be good? –  Sempus Oct 3 '13 at 15:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here the bug is:

// ... 
} else if (isbn > midVal) {
    lower = midVal + 1;
} else if (isbn < midVal) {
    upper - midVal - 1;
}

You may want

lower = middle + 1;

and

upper = middle - 1;

instead. You also need to explicitly return something when the required number cannot be found.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahhhhhhh, stupid mistake, got it, thanks. I was comparing the value instead of the location. –  Sempus Oct 3 '13 at 15:07
    
If the value he is searching for ever ends up on one of the ends (lower or upper), his search will fail to find a result (even though it is in the vector). His while condition is the problem there. –  Zac Howland Oct 3 '13 at 15:43

You still have a slight logic problem with your while condition:

int binary_search(int i, const std::vector<int>& vec) // you really should pass in the vector, if not convert it to use iterators
{
    int result = -1; // default return value if not found
    int lower = 0;
    int upper = vec.size() - 1;

    while (lower <= upper)  // this will let the search run when lower == upper (meaning the result is one of the ends)
    {
        int middle = (lower + upper) / 2;
        int val = vec[middle]; 

        if (val == i)
        {
            result = middle;
            break;
        }
        else if (i > val)
        {
            lower = middle + 1; // you were setting it to the value instead of the index
        }
        else if (i < val)
        {
            upper = middle - 1; // same here
        }
    }

    return result;  // moved your return down here to always return something (avoids a compiler error)
}

Alternatively, you could switch it to use iterators instead:

template<class RandomIterator>
RandomIterator binary_search(int i, RandomIterator start, RandomIterator end)
{
    RandomIterator result = end;

    while (start <= end) // this will let the search run when start == end (meaning the result is one of the ends)
    {
        RandomIterator middle = start + ((end - start) / 2);

        if (*middle == i)
        {
            result = middle;
            break;
        }
        else if (i > *middle)
        {
            start = middle + 1;
        }
        else if (i < *middle)
        {
            end = middle - 1;
        }
    }

    return result;
}
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