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I'm learning Boost.Asio and this is the code I'm talking about: Link to code

The following code I have written appears to be the same and it works: (compile with "-lboost_system" and "-std=c++11")

#include<iostream>
#include<boost/asio.hpp>
#include<functional>
#include<boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

typedef const boost::system::error_code cbse;
int main()
{
    boost::asio::io_service io;

    boost::asio::deadline_timer t(io,boost::posix_time::seconds(1));

    int count=0;

    std::function<void(cbse&)> 
    cb=[&](cbse&)
    {
        if(count<5)
        {
            std::cout<<"foo"<<std::endl;
            count++;
            t.expires_at(t.expires_at()+boost::posix_time::seconds(1));
            t.async_wait(cb);
        }
        else
            std::cout<<"done"<<std::endl;
    };

    t.async_wait(cb);

    std::cout<<"Hello"<<std::endl;

    io.run();

    return 0;
}

Am I missing some important distinction?
Also recursively calling the callback does not seem like a good idea to me intuitively, is it given in the doc just for the sake of explanation?

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If you use c++11, it's worth utilizing type deduction: auto cb = .... –  Igor R. Oct 3 '13 at 15:30
    
@IgorR.: Wont compile , because the object is used before the type is deduced. –  manasij7479 Oct 3 '13 at 15:33
    
Right, missed that point... –  Igor R. Oct 3 '13 at 15:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Am I missing some important distinction?

Your code looks ok, and has about the same behavior as the example code you linked to. The only real difference is that you're accessing t and count from the enclosing scope, rather than using parameters. This is ok in a simple example like this, but can introduce problems for more complex code.

Also recursively calling the callback does not seem like a good idea to me intuitively, is it given in the doc just for the sake of explanation?

Calling async_wait again from the callback is essential to get the desired behavior. Otherwise the callback would be called only once.

Chaining asynchronous callbacks like this can be very useful when done with care, but can quickly lead to difficult to understand/debug code if not.

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Thanks, can you think of a less 'kludgy' alternative to this chaining pattern? –  manasij7479 Oct 3 '13 at 15:35
    
@manasij7479 : it depends entirely on what you want to do. If you want to call a function a number of times at a given interval (which is what the example shows), and want to do so using asynchronous calls, then the presented way is appropriate. The only real alternative is to do everything synchronously in a loop with a sleep or so. –  Sander De Dycker Oct 3 '13 at 15:39
    
@manasij7479 : it takes a while to wrap your head around the asynchronous model. It's not the be-all-end-all solution, but there are cases where it shines. The trick is to know when to use it, and when to avoid it (like with every tool). –  Sander De Dycker Oct 3 '13 at 15:46
    
@manasij7479 The alternative is to use co-routines: boost.org/doc/libs/1_54_0/doc/html/boost_asio/example/cpp11/… –  Igor R. Oct 3 '13 at 16:03

Your code seems to be ok.

What you do is not recursively calling, because deadlock_timer::async_wait just posts an event and returns immediately. The callback is actually called from loop in ioservice::run.

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auto won't compile , because the object cb is used before the type is deduced. –  manasij7479 Oct 3 '13 at 15:34
    
@manasij7479, have you tried? I can't find where "object cb is used before the type is deduced"? –  Ivan Grynko Oct 3 '13 at 15:37
    
t.async_wait(cb); –  manasij7479 Oct 3 '13 at 15:40
    
really, I missed this "internal" line. Thanks. –  Ivan Grynko Oct 3 '13 at 15:47

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