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Trying to xor a huge uint32 array I decided to use NEON coprocessor.

I implemented two c versions:

version 1:

uint32_t xor_array_ver_1(uint32_t *array, int size)
{
    uint32x2_t acc = vmov_n_u32(0);
    uint32_t acc1 = 0;
    for (; size != 0; size -= 2) {
        uint32x2_t vec;
        vec = vld1_u32(array);
        array += 2;
        acc = veor_u32(acc, vec);
    }
    acc1 = vget_lane_u32(acc,0) ^ vget_lane_u32(acc,1);
    return acc1;
}

version 2:

uint32_t xor_array_ver_2(uint32_t *array, int size)
{
    uint32x4_t acc = vmovq_n_u32(0);
    uint32_t acc1 = 0;

    for (; size != 0; size -= 4) {
        uint32x4_t vec;
        vec = vld1q_u32(array);
        array += 4;
        acc = veorq_u32(acc, vec);
    }

    acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,0);
    acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,1);
    acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,2);
    acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,3);

    return acc1;
}

Comparing the above 2 versions to the traditional xor implementation:

for (i=0; i<arr_size; i++)
        val ^= my_array[i];

I observed 2 issues:

  1. Version 1 has the same performance.
  2. Version 2 is more than 30% better.

  1. Can I rewrite it to be even better ? where my_array is declared as uint32_t my_array[BIG_LENGTH];
  2. Is there a non-NEON way I can improve the performance of the regular xoring code? unrolling the loop doesn't give any improvement.
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Most likely this will be memory bandwidth limited - once you saturate the available DRAM bandwidth, which should be quite easy to do with only one ALU operation per load, you won't get any further benefit from optimisation.

Try to combine your XOR with another operation on the same data if possible - that way you amortise the cost of the cache misses.

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1  
True that this will be bandwidth limited, however neon back-ends have better memory ports. If you look for a memcpy implementation for a smartphone for example, you will probably see they try to handle blocks of 64 via neon units. –  auselen Oct 3 '13 at 19:14
    
Can you explain this line Try to combine your XOR with another operation on the same data if possible - that way you amortise the cost of the cache misses. do you mean to do a dummy operation with the data in addition of the eor ?! –  0x90 Oct 4 '13 at 5:40
    
Well I don't know anything about your particular app, but if you have more than one operation on your data, e.g. suppose you have two operations, one where you, say, subtract two buffers and then another where you XOR the result buffer from the previous operation, then if you do this as two passes through the data you pay for loads (and stores) twice, whereas if you do it all in one pass then you only pay for one load/store per element. Of course this may not apply in your case, but it's an important general principle for code optimization. –  Paul R Oct 4 '13 at 5:48

A lengthly answer without any code snippets.

Hardware limits

First you should ask yourself what do I expect? Do you want to write the fastest code possible? How can you verify that? Start with for example writing some tests on what your hardware can achieve. As people pointed this will be mostly memory bandwidth limited, but then you need to know how fast your memory interface is. Figure out your platform's L1, L2 and ram capacity / performance characteristics, then you'll know what you can expect at most for different buffer sizes.

Compiler

Are you using latest compiler? Following question then is, are you using tools available to you at their best? Most of the compilers do not aggressively try to optimize your code, unless you told so. Are you configuring them for your best gain? Are you enabling full optimization (gcc: -O3), vectorization (gcc: -ftree-vectorize -ftree-vectorizer-verbose=1)? Do you set right configuration flags for your platform (-mcpu -mfpu)?

Are you verifying object code generated by compiler? For such a simple loop this would be very easy and help you try many configuration options and check the code produced.

Tweaks

Are you checking if using restricted pointers improves the performance?

What about alignment information? (For example you don't mention in your intrinsics examples but they expect size to be a multiply of 2 or 4 and of course that with usage of quad registers can create %30 improvement.)

What also about trying alignment on cache line size?

Hardware capabilities

Do you know what your hardware is capable of? For example Cortex-A9 is introduced as "Out-of-order speculative issue superscalar". Can you take advantage of having dual issue capabilities?

So the answer is somewhere between "it depends" and "you need to experiment".

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, can you please explain in the HW capabilities what do you mean by Can you take advantage of having dual issue capabilities? –  0x90 Oct 4 '13 at 10:09
    
I didn't see in arm's manual what is the best aligment for data loaded by vld1q_u32 –  0x90 Oct 4 '13 at 10:32
    
@0x90 for vld alignment infocenter.arm.com/help/topic/com.arm.doc.dui0204j/…. I think it should get better with value increasing, meaning 16 byte alignment is better than 8 byte. –  auselen Oct 4 '13 at 12:35
    
@0x90 dual issue idea: use two different registers (arm) to xor even and odd indexed data, then xor them at the end. see if this differs from using a single register to xor all data. –  auselen Oct 4 '13 at 12:37
    
+1. However, I may add that GCC sucks beyond anyone's imagination. Even the most recent version (4.7.3) is so bad that people shouldn't bother optimizing their codes to start with. The -O3 option almost always results in oversized, slower codes. It's such a donkey. –  Jake 'Alquimista' LEE Oct 5 '13 at 7:33

It's well known fact that neon intrinsics on gcc suck badly. Not sure if it was improved, but doing the same task in asm should give you way better improvement that 30% over plain c. You probably need to unroll the inner loop first of all. An easy way of transforming intrinsics to proper asm is to use armcc (compiler from arm) that works with intrinsics.

So, first try to unroll your plain c version (pseudo code):

for (i=arr_size; i<arr_size; i -= 4)
{
    val1 ^= my_array[0];
    val2 ^= my_array[1];
    val1 ^= my_array[2];
    val2 ^= my_array[3];
    my_array += 4;
}

doing something like that with neon should give you better results. Eventually, you should switch to neon asm, it's quite simple (Personally, I find it easier to write than the intrinsics).

Here's NEON asm suggestion (It's untested, up to you to figure out how to assemble it)

//data has to be suitably aligned (it has to be 8 or 16 byte aligned, not sure).
//dataSize in bytes has to be multiple of 64 and has to be at least 128.
//function does xor of uint32_t values and returns the result.
unsigned xor_array_64(const void *data, int dataSize);

xor_array_64:
      vldm r0!,{d0-d7}
      subs r1,r1,#0x40
0:
      pld [r0, #0xC0]
      vldm r0!,{d16-d23}
      veor q0, q0, q8
      veor q1, q1, q9
      veor q2, q2, q10
      veor q3, q3, q11
      subs r1,r1,#0x40
      bge 0b

      veor q0, q0, q1
      veor q2, q2, q3
      veor q0, q0, q2
      veor d0, d0, d1

      vtrn.32 d1, d0
      veor d0, d0, d1

      vmov r0, s0
      bx lr
share|improve this answer
    
BTW seems that unrolling loop doesn't have any affect on the performance and it is was useful only when Duff was thinking about that :( –  0x90 Oct 3 '13 at 16:34
    
I think your case is too simple to write NEON code. Check memcpy implementations article on arm.com. The most optimized version was 50% faster than simplest loop in C. As it was said, it's limited by memory access, since there isn't much happening with data. It would make sense to use neon if you needed to perform multiple operations with each byte/word. Doing xor is almost doing nothing with the data :) –  Pavel Oct 3 '13 at 22:39
    
Unfortunately you intuition is healthy but you wrong looping and xoring a 300 MB buffer takes dozen seconds, and that can be optimized. If you can add the assembly generated by armcc I'll be grateful. –  0x90 Oct 4 '13 at 5:38
    
IF you have a pure assembly implementation suggestion please suggest it. –  0x90 Oct 4 '13 at 5:50
    
I added neon asm. If you don't control size/alignment of the buffers, then you'll need to handle begging/end of buffers in C to ensure that asm part gets proper input, or you can update asm code if you want it to handle any kind of input. –  Pavel Oct 4 '13 at 20:24

I don't write for ARM, and I'm not familiar with NEON at all, but I had the following thought, which is dependent on ARM NEON being a pipelined architecture, which I don't know if it is....

If Paul R is correct about your memory bandwidth being saturated, this may have little if any benefit, but what if you slightly restructured your code as follows.....

uint32_t xor_array_ver_2(uint32_t *array, int size)
{
  // Caveat:  'size' must be a positive multiple of 4, otherwise this
  //          code will loop for a very long time... and almost certainly
  //          segfault (or whatever term your system uses).

  uint32x4_t acc = vmovq_n_u32(0);
  uint32x4_t next_vec = vld1q_u32(array);
  uint32_t acc1 = 0;

  for (size-=4, array+=4; size != 0; size-=4) {
     uint32x4_t vec = next_vec;
     array += 4;
     next_vec = vld1q_u32(array);
     acc = veorq_u32(acc, vec);
  }
  acc = veorq_u32(acc, next_vec);

  acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,0);
  acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,1);
  acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,2);
  acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,3);

  return acc1;
}

....with the goal of getting started on the load of the next vector element before it's needed for the following loop.

Another slight twist you might try is this:

uint32_t xor_array_ver_2(uint32_t *array, int size)
{
  // Caveat:  'size' must be a positive multiple of 4, otherwise this
  //          code will loop for a very long time... and almost certainly
  //          segfault (or whatever term your system uses).

  uint32x4_t acc = vmovq_n_u32(0);
  uint32x4_t next_vec = vld1q_u32(&array[size-4]);
  uint32_t acc1 = 0;

  for (size-=8; size>=0; size-=4) {
     uint32x4_t vec = next_vec;
     next_vec = vld1q_u32(&array[size]);
     acc = veorq_u32(acc, vec);
  }
  acc = veorq_u32(acc, next_vec);

  acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,0);
  acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,1);
  acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,2);
  acc1 ^= vgetq_lane_u32(acc,3);

  return acc1;
}
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@0x90 - I'm interested in the results if you try my suggestions above. –  phonetagger Oct 4 '13 at 16:39

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