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Under what circumstances does "this" and "element" in the code below refer to the page instead of the selector?

$("a.tag")
    .each(
        function (index, element) {
           console.log("'this' is " + this);
           console.log("'element' is " + element);
        }
    )

produces the following as many times as there are elements:

'this' is file:///C:/Projects/PlaceTag/PlaceTag/default.html# default.html:50
'element' is file:///C:/Projects/PlaceTag/PlaceTag/default.html# 
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3  
Interesting... never seen that before: jsfiddle.net/nYHfb –  Jason P Oct 3 '13 at 15:36
    
@JasonP the same phenomenon was mentioned HERE –  matewka Oct 3 '13 at 15:40
    
Try console.log(this === el); –  CodeGroover Oct 3 '13 at 15:43
    
I just love it when debugging code is what breaks the application! –  Metaphor Oct 3 '13 at 15:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Both this and element always refer to the DOM element in a .each() callback.

Your code coerces the DOM element to a string through the + concatenation operator.
This returns the element's href property.

Instead, you can pass the object itself to log():

console.log("'this' is ", this);
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Shouldn't string coercion result in [object Object] instead of the page URL? –  Frédéric Hamidi Oct 3 '13 at 15:36
1  
@FrédéricHamidi: HTMLAnchorElement has its own toString(). –  SLaks Oct 3 '13 at 15:36
    
Of course. Thank you for your reply :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Oct 3 '13 at 15:37
    
Thank you, this answered my question. –  Metaphor Oct 3 '13 at 15:39

Any time you use .each, your context changes and thus 'this' changes. The easy solution would be to add a reference to 'this'.

var self = this;
$("a.tag")
.each(
    function (index, element) {
       console.log("'self' is " + self);
       console.log("'this' is " + this);
       console.log("'element' is " + element);
    }
)
share|improve this answer
1  
That's the opposite of what he wants. –  SLaks Oct 3 '13 at 15:36
    
It's still a valuable insight. Thank you for your answer. –  Metaphor Oct 3 '13 at 15:42

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