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I am a bit confused about how to use constructor and setter in Java, please see the sample code below:

public class Name {
   private String name;

   public void setName(String name){
      this.name=name;
   }  
   public String getName(){
      return name;
   }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Name a=new Name();
    a.setName("123");       
    System.out.println(a.getName());
}

It prints out 123, it is using setter method without constructor, I also wrote the other code below:

public class Name {
   private String name;


   public Name(String nm){
      name=nm;
   }
   public String getName(){
      return name;
   }  
}



public static void main(String[] args) {
   Name a=new Name("123");

   System.out.println(a.getName());

}

This one prints out 123 as well, it is using constructor without setter method, this is why I do not understand what the difference in using between constructor and setter, please advise, cheers!

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1  
See the Java tutorial: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/constructors.html –  Tichodroma Oct 3 '13 at 15:51
    
In the second sample no one can change the name after it is constructed (immutable object); not the same as the first, where you can change the name to an existing object all times you want (mutable object). –  Electrosa Oct 3 '13 at 15:53

6 Answers 6

What if you want to change the value of name for an instance. Of course, you wouldn't use constructor for that, as it will create a new instance. You would use a setter in that case.

Of course, if you are writing an immutable class, then you wouldn't give any setters. Any modification in the instance fields, will create a new instance.

One more important point to understand here is, since you have provided a parameterized constructor in your 2nd code, the compiler wouldn't add any default constructor. So, the 2nd class doesn't actually have any 0-arg constructor. If you want to use it later on, then you have to add one explicitly.

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1  
thanks Rohit, does it mean constructor just give a initialized value, but when I want to change this value later, i will need to use setter method to do it? –  pei wang Oct 3 '13 at 15:54
    
@peiwang Yes, exactly that. –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '13 at 15:55

If you have a setter you can change the value anytime after creation. Otherwise, the field cannot be modified after construction (it's immutable).

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1  
Hi Gabriel,based on your comment, I cannot change the value in the second sample as I was using constructor to create the value, but how about I change the value like this: Name a=new Name("123")--> Name a=new Name("456"); –  pei wang Oct 3 '13 at 15:58
    
@peiwang You're not changing the value, but you are creating a new instance all together. –  Rohit Jain Oct 3 '13 at 16:00
    
You didn't change the name field this way, but you created a new Name object and assigned it to a. –  Gabriel Negut Oct 3 '13 at 16:00

It all has to do with the necessity of the name variable. If you put it as a setter, a new Name object can be created without setting the name variable. If it's in the constructor, you can't create a new Name object without specifying the name attribute.

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2  
+1, different idea than the other answers –  Cruncher Oct 3 '13 at 15:54
2  
+1 its a good point –  Juned Ahsan Oct 3 '13 at 15:56

You can do both. It is a choice you must make depending on your design.

When you design a class, you must ensure that its instances are always in a consistent state.

In this case, a class Name without name might be considered as inconsistent. Hence, your class is in an inconsistent state until you call the setter. In this case, prefer the constructor option.

You can also decide to do both (constructor + setters) if you want to allow renaming.

To go further : All boxing classes in Java (Integer, Double, Float etc) are immutable. Hence, they have no setters on their embedded value.

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The easiest way to understand it is just by looking at the words used to describe two methods:

Setter - Can be used to set name, so you can change the value of name at any other instance.

Constructor - I used to construct name, so it would construct a new name and therefor you could not use it to change the pre-existing one.

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Constructors create a new instance of an object and you can instantiate that object with variables you want it to take on initially.

Setters let you change the values of variables after you create the object.

Getters let you access the values of the variables without actually letting you have access to them.

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