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For example is there any difference between this:

element{  
 property1: val1;  
 property2: val2;  
}  

and this:

element{  
 property2: val2;  
 property1: val1;  
}  

?

UPDATE I mean different properties for example width and padding.

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The only difference is only if both properties affect the same element, and in this case the order would matter. –  Henrique Feijo Oct 3 '13 at 18:59
    
You should probably do a little reading: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS –  j08691 Oct 3 '13 at 19:04
1  
Width and padding are not the same property so their order is irrelevant. div { width: 200px; padding: 20px; } and div { padding: 20px; width: 200px; } will produce identical results on the front end, unless the nonstandard box model border-box is used, which means padding is subtracted from the width rather than added to it as it is in the default content-box box model. –  Ennui Oct 3 '13 at 19:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

if both properties affect the same properties then yes. if you ..

.example {
   margin-right: 12px;
   margin: 5px auto;
}

the second property cancels out the first property

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only in this case? –  David Oct 3 '13 at 19:03
1  
only in cases where the properties being defined are the same, yes. most commonly seen for properties that have shorthand (like margin or padding or background or border etc). So writing div { margin: 20px; margin-bottom: 10px; } and div { margin: 20px 20px 10px } mean the same thing. –  Ennui Oct 3 '13 at 19:05
4  
Technically, the properties margin-right and margin are not the same. The latter is a shorthand that sets the former, along with some other properties. Similar considerations apply to other shorthands, like font or background. –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 3 '13 at 19:26

If the properties are the same, the last one will overwrite the first, and thus be applied.

#div1 {
    width:100px;
    padding:20px;
}

The properties are different, thus there is no difference. Both properties are applied.

#div2 {
    width:100px;
    width:200px;
    padding:20px;
}

The width property is being applied twice. The last one, width:200px will overwrite width:100px, and thus be applied. In this example the width will be 200px and the padding will be 20px.

See MSN for the basics of CSS.

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If property1 and property2 affect the same property, the latter one will overwrite the former. For example:

div {
    background-image: url(images/test.png);
    background: transparent url(images/test2.png) no-repeat left top;
}

The latter background shorthand image test2.png will be used, not test.png from the first declaration. This is because when two CSS selectors target the same property of the same element with equal selector specificity, the last one overwrites any earlier declarations.

However, if the two declarations are not for the same property, the order does not matter.

Check out this great article breaking down CSS specificity rules for more information. Sounds like you need to get a better grasp on how the cascade works!

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I've heard sticklers that argue that CSS properties should be listed in alphabetical order. So there's that, if you want "pretty" code. Otherwise, no difference.

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