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This is my linq query and I get lots of duplicates with school names. so I created a regex function to trim the text:

public static string MyTrimmings(string str)
        {
        return Regex.Replace(str, @"^\s*$\n", string.Empty, RegexOptions.Multiline).TrimEnd();
        }

the text gets trimed alright, however, the dropdown values are all duplicates! please help me eliminate duplicates, oh Linq joy!!

ViewBag.schools = new[]{new SelectListItem
            {
                Value = "",
                Text = "All"
            }}.Concat(
            db.Schools.Where(x => (x.name != null)).OrderBy(o => o.name).ToList().Select(s => new SelectListItem
            {
                Value = MyTrimmings(s.name),
                Text = MyTrimmings(s.name)
            }).Distinct()
            );    
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i didn't know distinct take values good to know. thanks i will try that now. –  Menew Oct 3 '13 at 19:01
    
it said cannot compare lambda expression to iequalitycomparer error –  Menew Oct 3 '13 at 19:02
1  
See morelinq's DistinctBy –  L.B Oct 3 '13 at 19:12
    
Do your SelectListItem implement IComparable<SelectListItem>? If not you should, because Distinct uses this interface to do the comparaison. If it's not present, it uses the one from object –  Shimrod Oct 3 '13 at 19:14
    
@Shimrod no it doesn't how do i do that? –  Menew Oct 3 '13 at 19:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Assuming you have a School class you can write an IEqualityComparer

class SchoolComparer : IEqualityComparer<School>
{
    public bool Equals(School x, School y)
    {
        //Check whether the compared objects reference the same data. 
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(x, y)) return true;

        //Check whether any of the compared objects is null. 
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(x, null) || Object.ReferenceEquals(y, null))
            return false;

        //Check whether the school' properties are equal. 
        return x.Name == y.Name;
    }

    // If Equals() returns true for a pair of objects  
    // then GetHashCode() must return the same value for these objects. 

    public int GetHashCode(School school)
    {
        //Check whether the object is null 
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(school, null)) return 0;

        //Get hash code for the Name field if it is not null. 
        int hashSchoolName = school.Name == null ? 0 : school.Name.GetHashCode();

        //Calculate the hash code for the school. 
        return hashSchoolName;
    }
}

Then your linq query would look like this:

db.Schools.Where(x => x.name != null)
          .OrderBy(o => o.name).ToList()
          .Distinct(new SchoolComparer())
          .Select(s => new SelectListItem
            {
                Value = MyTrimmings(s.name),
                Text = MyTrimmings(s.name)
            });  
share|improve this answer
    
i get his error: LINQ to Entities does not recognize the method 'System.Linq.IQueryable1[namespace.Models.School] Distinct[School](System.Linq.IQueryable1[namespace.Models.School], System.Collections.Generic.IEqualityComparer`1[namespace.Models.School])' method, and this method cannot be translated into a store expression. –  Menew Oct 3 '13 at 19:29
    
I updated the answer, I had put the Distinct in the wrong place –  Esteban Elverdin Oct 3 '13 at 19:31
    
@EstebanElverdin Bringing in the entire result set and doing the work on the client side adds a lot of cost over doing the work on the DB end, which can both do it faster (usually) and reduce network traffic. Additionally, in the even that you do want to have a query run a LINQ to objects method you should use AsEnumerable not ToList to avoid eagerly executing the query, forcing the entire query to be in memory rather than having it streamed, and needlessly creating and then discarding a List object. –  Servy Oct 3 '13 at 19:39
    
@Servy, I understand your point, I was just trying to make the code in the question works as expected. Regarding the ToList vs AsEnumerable, in this particular case I think there is no difference. –  Esteban Elverdin Oct 3 '13 at 19:45
    
@EstebanElverdin I just listed three differences between them, all of which apply to this example. –  Servy Oct 3 '13 at 20:02

Distinct is poor, GroupBy for the win:

db.Schools.GroupBy(school => school.name).Select(grp => grp.First());
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You could make your class implement the IEquatable<T> interface, so Distinct will know how to compare them. Like this (basic example):

public class SelectListItem : IEquatable<SelectListItem>
{
    public string Value { get; set; }
    public string Text { get; set; }

    public bool Equals(SelectListItem other)
    {
        if (other == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return Value == other.Value && Text == other.Text;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            int hash = 17;

            if (Value != null)
            {
                hash = hash * 23 + Value.GetHashCode();
            }

            if (Text != null)
            {
                hash = hash * 23 + Text.GetHashCode();
            }

            return hash;
        }
    }
}

(GetHashCode taken fron John Skeet's answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/263416/249000)

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