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Does .NET have an in place sort function for IList? I need to sort the collection itself, not create a new collection.

EDIT: The reason I need to do the sort in place is to avoid redrawing the UI unless something has actually changed. I don't want to create a hundred new custom controls if only one item is out of place.

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Pretty sure that's a no. I think Array can, but is it really so critical that you can't generate a new collection? –  sircodesalot Oct 3 '13 at 19:07
1  
No, it's not part of the interface. Easy to do though with a little LINQ. –  LarsTech Oct 3 '13 at 19:07
    
Doesn't LINQ still create a new collection? –  sircodesalot Oct 3 '13 at 19:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about an in-place Quicksort / InsertionSort / ShellSort implementation:

public static class InPlaceQuickSort {
    private static void Swap<T>(IList<T> set, int left, int right) {
        T temp = set[left];
        set[left] = set[right];
        set[right] = temp;
    }

    private static Int32 Partition<T>(IList<T> set, int lBound, int rBound)
        where T : IComparable<T> {
        T pivot = set[rBound];
        int left = lBound - 1;
        int right = rBound;

        while (true) {

            while (set[++left].CompareTo(pivot) < 0) ;
            while (set[--right].CompareTo(pivot) > 0) if (left == right) break;

            if (left >= right) break;
            Swap(set, left, right);
        }

        Swap(set, left, rBound);
        return left;
    }

    private static IList<T> QuickSort<T>(IList<T> set, int lBound, int rBound)
        where T : IComparable<T> {
        if (lBound >= rBound) return set;

        Int32 pivot = Partition(set, lBound, rBound);
        QuickSort(set, lBound, pivot - 1);
        QuickSort(set, pivot + 1, rBound);

        return set;
    }

    public static IList<T> InsertionSort<T>(this IList<T> set)
        where T : IComparable<T> {
        for (Int32 index = 1; index < set.Count; index++) {
            for (Int32 insertion = index; insertion > 0 && set[insertion - 1].CompareTo(set[insertion]) > 0; insertion--) {
                Swap(set, insertion - 1, insertion);
            }
        }

        return set;
    }

    public static IList<T> ShellSort<T>(this IList<T> set)
        where T : IComparable<T> {
        Int32 shell = 1;

        while (shell < (set.Count / 3)) shell = shell * 3 + 1;

        while (shell >= 1) {
            for (Int32 index = shell; index < set.Count; index++) {
                for (Int32 insertion = index; insertion >= shell && set[insertion - shell].CompareTo(set[insertion]) > 0; insertion -= shell) {
                    Swap(set, insertion - shell, insertion);
                }
            }

            shell = shell / 3;
        }

        return set;
    }

    public static IList<T> QuickSort<T>(this IList<T> set)
        where T : IComparable<T> {
        return QuickSort<T>(set, 0, set.Count - 1);
    }
}

And, here's how you use it:

public static void Main() {
    List<Int32> numbers = new List<int> { 1, 3, 2, 4, 2 };

    foreach (Int32 number in numbers.QuickSort())
        Console.WriteLine(number);

    Console.ReadLine();
}
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1  
I don't know if returning the list is a good idea. Typically when functions return a modified list, it's assumed they don't modify the old one. –  cHao Oct 3 '13 at 19:25
    
Yeah, not sure the reasoning behind choosing IList<T>, but I cooked this up made to order. –  sircodesalot Oct 3 '13 at 19:26
    
QuickSort is a bad choice for UI work. It's worse-case scenario, a sorted or nearly sorted list, is triggered whenever a new item is added to the list. –  Jonathan Allen Oct 3 '13 at 19:27
    
@JonathanAllen EDIT: Added insertion sort. –  sircodesalot Oct 3 '13 at 19:29
1  
@Moho: Wasn't the point of the question that .NET does not provide "an in place sort function for IList", so built-in algorithms wouldn't do? –  O. R. Mapper Oct 3 '13 at 19:42

No. Use IEnumerable.OrderBy() or SortedList<T>, both of which will create new collections. Question is why can't you create a new collection?

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It is UI-bound, so creating a new collection would require destroying and rebuilding a large part of the screen. –  Jonathan Allen Oct 3 '13 at 19:16
    
Also, if the list is already in order then the operation should be a no-op. –  Jonathan Allen Oct 3 '13 at 19:21
    
How would the list know it is ordered? –  Moho Oct 3 '13 at 19:22
    
@Moho: Lists are by definition ordered. If you mean sorted, then the list will be sorted til something is added to it. Re-sort when you add, using an algorithm whose best case is an already-nearly-sorted list, and there ya go. –  cHao Oct 3 '13 at 19:33
    
If you use bubble sort then it does a pass to verify that the items are in order. Though it has a bad rep, bubble sort is actually pretty damn fast when dealing with lists that are already in order or close to it. –  Jonathan Allen Oct 3 '13 at 19:33

Something like this should do the trick if you really need it to be in-place.

public static class Extensions
{
    public static void InPlaceSort(this IList list)
    {
        var sortedItems = new object[list.Count];
        for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; ++i)
        {
            sortedItems[i] = list[i];
        }
        Array.Sort(sortedItems);
        for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; ++i)
        {
            list[i] = sortedItems[i];
        }
    }
}


IList list = new[] { 3,1,2 };
list.InPlaceSort(); // { 1, 2, 3 }

list = new List<int>(new[] { 4, 2, 3 });
list.InPlaceSort(); // List<int> { 2, 3, 4 }

If you were using IList<T> instead of just IList, you could save yourself the first few lines and do:

var sortedItems = list.OrderBy(x => x).ToArray();

You'd still need the simple loop at the end to put them back into the original collection though.

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I fixed the question to say IList<T>. I can't imagine any reason someone would want to still use the untyped version. –  Jonathan Allen Oct 3 '13 at 19:19
2  
Doesn't that still create another collection? –  sircodesalot Oct 3 '13 at 19:20
    
Yes, but not as far as the UI is concerned so it is the right answer for me. –  Jonathan Allen Oct 3 '13 at 19:22
    
@sircodesalot: It does, but the items are then put back into the original list in order. It's not strictly in-place, but it's close enough for government work. –  cHao Oct 3 '13 at 19:22
1  
I wonder, if you skip the ToArray step will LINQ still make a new collection internally? –  Jonathan Allen Oct 3 '13 at 19:28

Another take on the extension method solution by keeping it simple and using .NET's built-in sorting (also allowing for custom IComparers

public static class IListExtensions
{
    public static void Sort<T>(this IList<T> list)
    {
        var orderedList = list.OrderBy(i => i).ToArray();

        for( int i = 0; i < list.Count; ++i )
        {
            list[i] = orderedList[i];
        }
    }

    public static void Sort<T>(this IList<T> list, IComparer<T> comparer )
    {
        var orderedList = list.OrderBy(i => i, comparer).ToArray();

        for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; ++i)
        {
            list[i] = orderedList[i];
        }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var orig = new List<int>() { 2, 3, 1 };
        var toOrder = orig;

        Console.Write("Orig: ");
        orig.ForEach(i => Console.Write("{0} ", i));
        toOrder.Sort();
        Console.Write("\nOrdered: ");
        toOrder.ForEach(i => Console.Write("{0} ", i));
        Console.Write("\nOrig: ");
        orig.ForEach(i => Console.Write("{0} ", i));


        Console.ReadLine();
    }

}
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