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I'm kind of a beginner in C. I was was trying to run this code in Code::Blocks and Ideone and both gave me the same runtime error. I tried changing arr[100] to arr[101] and astonishingly enough, the code ran. I am also worried about the initialisation of poo[t], because it doesn't seem to store the value of sum in it. Or maybe the sum retains the value 0 (Could it be that the switch statement does not allow char cases?)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
   int arr[100], t, poo[t], i, j, sum; // refer HOLES

   scanf("%d", &t);

   for (i=0; i<t; i++) {
        scanf("%s", arr);
        j=0;
        sum = 0;
        while (arr[j] != '\0') {
            switch (arr[j])
            {
            case 'B':
                sum = sum + 2;
                break;
            case 'A':
            case 'D':
            case 'O':
            case 'P':
            case 'Q':
            case 'R':
                sum++;
                break;
            default:
                break;
            }
            j++;
        }
        poo[i] = sum;
        printf("%d", poo[i]);
   }

   for (i=0; i<t; i++)
   {
        printf("%d \n", poo[i]);
   }

    return 0;
}
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1  
What input are you feeding the program when it crashes? –  hall.stephenk Oct 3 '13 at 19:50
    
I think the issue lies with the initialization of poo[t]. t is non-const, and array declarations require a const value. –  William Custode Oct 3 '13 at 19:51
    
Are you feeding it text which is 100 characters long (or longer)? It will break in that case. You should use safer input code anyway. –  Dave Oct 3 '13 at 19:52
    
honestly i don't get this poo[t], static allocation should be static. –  Gar Oct 3 '13 at 19:53
    
and a 100 characters long text fits in 101 array (because you have to add the \0 terminator of the string). –  Gar Oct 3 '13 at 19:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
int arr[100];
scanf("%s", arr);

if arr was meant to be a string, it should be declared as char array:

char arr[100];
scanf("%s", arr);

" I am also worried about the initialisation of poo[t]"

You should be. The following declaration:

int t, poo[t];
scanf("%d", &t);

uses unitialized variable t invoking an undefined behavior.

Declare poo after the t is properly initialized:

int t = 0;
scanf("%d", &t);
int poo[t];
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this line

int arr[100], t, poo[t], i, j, sum; // refer HOLES

is not good since t is not initialized before use.

If you really want to use VLA, do like this

int t;
scanf("&d", t);

int poo[t];
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Recommended fix: if you have an upper limit for t, i.e. t <= N, then have int poo[N];. –  pts Oct 3 '13 at 19:51
    
yes. but C99 has so called VLA feature. –  John Smith Oct 3 '13 at 19:53
    
With C99 and VLA enabled, is the line correct? –  pts Oct 3 '13 at 19:53
    
see my updated answer. –  John Smith Oct 3 '13 at 19:54

One of the problems here is this line:

scanf("%s", arr);

Note that arr is declared as

int arr[100];

This means that you are reading a string (a series of chars) into an array of integers. This doesn't cause each integer to hold one character; instead, the bytes of the integers will be filled in using character values. Consequently, when you iterate over the elements of the array, you will not get back clean values like \0.

To fix this, change the declaration of arr so that it's a char array:

char arr[100];

There may be other issues here, but this is certainly an issue you'll need to fix.

Hope this helps!

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You should put poo[t] after scant which reads actual size of the array.

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poo[t] is a variable length array, valid in C99. To use VLA you must assign a value to t.

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