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I'm trying to make an array of random colors from another array.

 String [] colors = new String[6];
         colors[0] = "red";
         colors[1] = "green";
         colors[2] = "blue";
         colors[3] = "yellow";
         colors[4] = "purple";
         colors[5] = "orange";

That's my array as of now. I want to make a new array with just 4 of those colors without duplicates.

So far I know how to make an array of randoms; however, I don't know how to take care of duplicates efficiently.

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marked as duplicate by Hot Licks, Makoto, Eran, rgettman, Johan Oct 4 '13 at 2:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Add them to a LinkedList, and take (remove) from a random index between 0 and size() –  Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 3 '13 at 20:32
2  
You have few ways to achieve this. You can unsort a list of numbers from 0,1,2,3,4,5 and get the first 4 after the unsort. By unsort I mean shuffle them. You can randomly remove one of the elements. You can keep adding them to a Set collections, although it may take a while to finally add them all. –  porfiriopartida Oct 3 '13 at 20:33
1  
loop and add to a HashSet until the size of the HashSet is 4 would be by approach –  Cruncher Oct 3 '13 at 20:33
    
I strongly suggest Knuth's shuffling algorithm, provides very good randomness for shuffling. You can pick the DataStructure of your choice to remove dups.. –  phntmasasin Oct 3 '13 at 20:37
    
This question gets asked about 5 times a week -- how to make a random selection without replacement. Please spend a little time searching for the answer. –  Hot Licks Oct 3 '13 at 20:37

4 Answers 4

Sounds like you want a Set. A Set is designed to remove duplicates.

Set<String> set = ...
for(String s : "a,b,c,d,e,f,d,e,c,a,b".split(","))
    set.add(s);

This set will have all the unique strings.

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2  
This is a completely non-Java way to program. Looks more like lisp/clojure. Get some sequences and go! –  Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 3 '13 at 20:35
3  
@SotiriosDelimanolis It uses methods from java.lang, does get more Java than that. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Oct 3 '13 at 20:41
List<String> colourList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(colors));
Collections.shuffle(colourList);
return colourList.subList(0,4).toArray();
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I'd strongly suggest you don't use arrays for this. Add what you need to a Set and it will handle duplicate management for you. You can always convert back to an array if need be.

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You can just select random entries from colors, and add them into a Set until the set has four elements:

Set<String> randomStrings = new HashSet<String>();
Random random = new Random();
while( randomStrings.size() < 4) {
    int index = random.nextInt( colors.length);
    randomStrings.add( colors[index]);
}

You can try it out in this demo, where it selects four colors at random when you run it. You'll get output similar to:

Random colors: [orange, red, purple, blue]
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But you have to do it without replacement. –  Hot Licks Oct 3 '13 at 20:38
1  
This IS without replacement. It's going into a Set. –  David Wallace Oct 3 '13 at 20:39

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