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So when using Facebook login, it turns out that if you set response_type to token or code%20token then the "response data is included as a URL fragment" on the URL that redirects to your app. Seriously, why? When would that ever be useful to anyone?

Anyway, I'm hoping that this is somehow security related and that it's there for a reason other than to annoy people, but I would otherwise like to know if there's a way to disable it, since I'm using Angular and it's a real pain to handle urls with hashbangs.

If I set a response_type of code only, the code is returned as a nice and clean query parameter, but I would like to receive both in order to perform additional validations. Is there a way to change this behaviour? Thanks.

EDIT: Well it turns out that setting a response_type of code returns #/= at the end of the url, so there's no way to get a clean querystring. It has already been established that there is no way to change this behaviour, but I'm still interested in finding out why Facebook is doing it. Is it security related? What is the purpose of these url fragments?

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To your first question, I imagine you would use token when you are handling everything in-browser and not processing at the server.

To your main question, as far as I know, you can not change how Facebook redirects successful authorizations. Facebook doesn't give you the token as a clean query parameter. If you use token or code token, what you want will be in the hash fragment. Sorry.


NOTE: This may not be a problem for you. I'm not sure what you want with "additional validations", but when you use code token, exchanging the resulting code gets you a different token than the one you just got embedded in the URI. Both are now valid and will expire separately. Really, you probably need either the code or the token; both won't help you since they're not linked.


Examples of using all three methods:

If you set response_type to code you get redirected to something like:

http://example.com/redirect_uri?state=thestatepassed&code=AQDN9E9GYjA8NbyCt
87_jV5vHnCQylNxmBswo6Z1BsrR7lmTPom6wjrzfan6P4GBLDt3EQrfPg0xSLoMLxBBfscsyfSY
JNM2vu9OoqEQXXSJCTUq_fMpUwqkYbCHp-GAqL4H1ymbMz7zPKAG61V9BtKTSuez39yhawOu7l-
6ww4thP41Ka9PVcknTQ6fPjPXKYSyxEmANps9zevCPFsXpBZCO7_dms65-ZZuG2wVBd16gFnBZH
q8EY0qih6-9o61wXh7bBvVPVSZ2im7Oj1nx47YgDpbD3X0XdlVhUoGYmBdER9hNmIC2PmmY7VAo
PlYCZc#_-_

From there, you need to exchange the code through Facebook's OAuth endpoint to receive an access token. The access token can then be used against the Facebook APIs.

If you set response_type to token you get redirected to something like:

http://example.com/redirect_uri#access_token=CAACYnSxGEhsBAJBg0ohZBhAf7pKEU
sm5ytZAZBzKjISFuRun2ZByZCqEsxrVIgtiO7iIlJZBBbGm6fRPQXItZCX6YgjPknUBsr78tJtv
W6fySULrUo9vdW57ZCMUUIlNaeZAcU8DzUXKmFpgotOyhE3jXYz1c3eu00Aii0AZBsPrtrwjpwQ
mV8VYQNiqKZBIsqOrIwZD&expires_in=4168&state=thestatepassed

You have everything you need to call the Facebook APIs. The access token returned is valid, but should probably be checked against Facebook's token inspection endpoint if you're doing something server-side. (Really, at that point, just use code. I've never done it this way, so good luck.)

As you noted, the access token is now contained within the hash fragment of the url.

If you set response_type to code token you get redirected to something like:

http://example.com/redirect_uri#code=AQAtzsjPivFPsJ538KFlPuhLaK6pDMlrGDiwmi
KDcpgNfWrO1EdX5i6zK_Op2D0QDEXZLyifXxh4TSeBZCWhnkl7YV1LMyEkbPURAWSoqRoeG7tfM
4nB4nDAHOK0H9umb0KnoypRT1pP05FJKhl2QjpCJrPPFDHl6y-1X9ZMj1uVHtmPNi4tG_6QAbuL
RaGadBkekb22uJ0iwSrWc9OKi6ET70lCTYb18hbwUkzHXtTq12nNEdsDJ7Ku2wEBwMygFwErYDX
CrnPoFoah_z0UPCfv3XZLy98Dhlzw_lnx8nnCB-PCppOWRqmydvQJehPd86k&access_token=C
AACYnSxGEhsBALXHRQwfm4UoauRlZBJDVpZCiM6ZCuM3bE965F5JVBfBB8inTFdhfJ5obnonSqa
m3v8FbWhHXrhRSx4ugwAmmDaWyxmPELWqSrkrDO5ueTUXhhjiEZBTd7HjCVCSOXXhOSo3DjEVSC
lOaZBfqmXsprYyc6LJC39sroCcHYCZCv&expires_in=5183426&state=thestatepassed

Now you have both an access token and a code (that expiration applies to the token, not the code). As stated earlier, that code can be exchanged for an access token in the usual way, but the returned access token will be different from the one you just got embedded in the URI.

But, again, what you care about is in the hash fragment.


See the AngularJS doc on $location for accessing the hash. Someone more knowledgable than me can speak to how that works with routes and how best to scrape the parameters.

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By additional validations I mean that I exchange the code for an access token and I also check the other access token with the inspection endpoint. This probably doesn't really make it more secure, but at least it adds another layer of annoyance for would-be hackers. I'm still interested in understanding why Facebook does this though. I already have angular code that deals with url fragments, but is not pretty and will break easily if Facebook change their format. –  JayPea Oct 4 '13 at 15:53
    
I'd suggest grabbing the code server-side to validate. I seriously doubt Facebook would change a format and break thousands of OAuth-dependant sites. When Google upgraded OAuth versions they simply created a new endpoint URL. –  Venning Oct 4 '13 at 23:34

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