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In the following code, I thought list wouldbe a unique variable to each object constructed. Why is it shared as a class variable?

01 class Thing(object):
02     def __init__(self, my_list=[]): 
03         self.list = my_list 
04         return 
05 
06 thing1=Thing()
07 thing2=Thing()
08 thing1.list.append(1)
09 print thing2.list     

id(thing1) is distinct from id(things2) but id(thing1.list) is the same as id(thing2.list).

If I use self.list = [] on line 3, the attribute is unique to each Thing. If I use thing1 = Thing(my_list=[]) on line 6, and similarly on line 7, then the attribute is unique to each Thing.

I am running Python 2.7 within the Canopy environment.

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1  
possible duplicate of "Least Astonishment" in Python: The Mutable Default Argument –  Martijn Pieters Oct 3 '13 at 22:19
    
You're changing __init__()'s mutable default argument. Make the default None and manually set it to [] in the method's body when that's its value. –  martineau Oct 3 '13 at 22:24
1  
This is explained in the FAQ. –  abarnert Oct 3 '13 at 22:32
    
Thanks all. Especially abarnert, as that FAQ (new to me) answers several other questions I had. –  BBrown Oct 3 '13 at 22:49
    
Having read the answers at "Least Astonishment", I think that it is better to leave the default as my_list=[] and then assign the instance variable to self.list = my_list[:] or self.list = list(my_list). This has the advantage that the parameter type is explicitly stated. –  BBrown Oct 3 '13 at 23:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should be doing something like this:

01 class Thing(object):
02     def __init__(self, my_list=None):
03         if my_list is None:
04           my_list = []
04         self.list = my_list 

See this post for an explanation as to why keyword arguments behave this way.

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I think that it is better to leave the default as my_list=[] and then assign the instance variable to self.list = my_list[:] or self.list = list(my_list). This way the parameter type is explicitly stated. –  BBrown Oct 3 '13 at 23:04
1  
BBrown, you should only do that if you are sure you want a copied version of my_list. There may be cases where you actually want to use my_list but want to have the option to have it default to []. –  cjfro Oct 4 '13 at 4:49
    
Thanks terrapin. I understand, my suggestion to use my_list[:] would prevent the object from being able to change the list it was passed. –  BBrown May 20 '14 at 23:45

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